Category Archives: Energy

Wind turbines’ CO2 savings and abatement cost

by Peter Lang

Wind turbines are less effective and CO2 abatement cost is higher than commonly assumed.

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What should renewables pay for grid service?

by Planning Engineer

There is a lot of public debate around the rates utilities charge solar customers, but very little of it shows an awareness of the embedded technical and philosophical issues.

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Road to Paris: Tracking climate pledges

by Judith Curry

I’m working to wrap my head around the emerging UNFCCC pledges to cut carbon emissions, in preparation for the Paris meeting next December.  Here’s what I’m reading.

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Taxonomy of climate/energy policy perspectives

by Planning Engineer

Debates on policy issues around climate and energy often feature opposing sides talking past each other.

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Towards mass marketed electric vehicles

by Robert Ellison

A look at the Drift EV concept for electric vehicles.

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All megawatts are not equal

by Planning Engineer

Some of the Climate Etc. denizens have requested a post on the generation planning process to help them better understand cost issues surrounding the large scale addition and integration of renewable resources.

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Climate/Energy Policy and the GOP Congress

by Judith Curry

With the Republicans in majority for both Houses of the 114th Congress, what are the implications for U.S. climate and energy policy?

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More renewables? Watch out for the Duck Curve

by Planning Engineer

It can be very misleading to compare the energy costs for wind and solar to the energy costs for more conventional generation technology and assume the difference is the cost of providing for “clean” energy.

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Myths and realities of renewable energy

by Planning Engineer

Power System Planners do not have the expertise or knowledge to say whether or not the benefits of reducing carbon emissions are worth the costs.   However they should be respected as experts for obtaining a better understanding of what the implications and costs of such programs are.

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Lomborg’s Senate testimony

by Judith Curry

Because   there   is   no   good, cheap   green   energy,   the   almost   universal  political  choices   have   been   expensive   policies   that   do   very   little. There   is   much   greater   scope   for   climate   policies to   make   the   total   climate   cost   greater   through  the   21st   century. – Bjorn Lomborg

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U.S. climate policy discussion thread

by Judith Curry

On Monday, Obama’s administration will announce major new policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Coal and the IPCC

by Dave Rutledge

Now that Working Group 3 has put its chapters on line, all six thousand pages of the IPCC’s 5th Assessment Report have arrived. Coal is the specter that looms.

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The folly of corn ethanol

by Judith Curry

I don’t know whether I can make the environmental argument, or the economic argument” – Tom Vilsack

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Impacts of China’s hydropower boom

by Judith Curry

China is engaged in a push to build hydroelectric dams on a scale unprecedented in human history. While being touted for producing lower-emission electricity, these massive dam projects are wreaking havoc on river systems across China and Southeast Asia. – Charlton Lewis

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Big(ger) coal

by Judith Curry

China has no alternative to coal, with its domestic gas output limited and liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports more costly than coal. – William Durbin

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Conflicts between climate and energy priorities

by Judith Curry

The world’s poor need more than a token supply of electricity.  The goal should be to provide the power necessary to boost productivity and raise living standards.  – Morgan Brazilian and Roger Pielke Jr.

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World’s Energy Appetite Growing

by Judith Curry

[W]orld energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. – EIA

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Why progressives should love a carbon tax

by Ed Dolan

. . . and why not all of them do.

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An energy model for the future, from the 12th century

by Judith Curry

So, are you wondering what we can learn about energy policy from the 12th century?

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Tilting at windmills in Germany

by Judith Curry

The wheels are falling off of Germany’s green energy revolution. – Walter Mead

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‘All-of-the-above’ approach to energy policy

The U.S. energy revolution is not confined to a single fuel or technology: oil and gas production, renewable energy, and fuel-efficient automobile technologies all show great promise. To best position the country for the future, U.S. leaders should capitalize on all these opportunities rather than pick a favorite; the answer lies in ‘most of the above.’ – Michael Levi

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What are the factors contributing to the reduction in U.S. carbon emissions?

by Judith Curry

The U.S. was the largest emitter carbon dioxide (CO2) until 2006 when China’s emissions exceeded the U.S.  U.S. CO2 emissions from the consumption of fossil fuels peaked in 2007 and have declined significantly over the past five years.  – John Miller

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IEA Facts and Fictions

by Rud Istvan and Brandon Shollenberger

Comments on the previous Climate Etc post on Maggio and Cacciola’s paper, When will oil, natural gas, and coal peak? motivated an analysis of the World Energy Outlook produced annually by the International Energy Agency (IEA).

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Another Hockey Stick

by Rud Istvan

Fossil fuel availability affects how much CO2 will be emitted, which might or might not affect climate much. Hubbert’s 1956 insight suggests total peak oil is near (around 2020), and that gas and coal will peak by midcentury.

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Limits(?) of green energy: is the Earth f_ked?

by Judith Curry

Whether the benefits of alternative energy outweigh its drawbacks depends on the policy context. – Ed Dolan

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