Category Archives: Scientific method

Truth(?) in testimony and convincing policy makers

by Judith Curry

Some reflections, stimulated by yesterday’s Congressional Hearing, on the different strategies of presenting Congressional testimony.

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Climate science’s ‘masking bias’ problem

by Judith Curry

How valid conclusions often lay hidden within research reports, masked by plausible but unjustified conclusions reached in those reports.  And how the IPCC institutionalizes such masking errors in climate science.

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Climate scientists’ motivated reasoning

by Judith Curry

Insights into the motivated reasoning of climate scientists, including my own efforts to sort out my own biases and motivated reasoning following publication of the Webster et al. (2005) paper

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Climate uncertainty monster: What’s the worst case?

by Judith Curry

On possibilities, known neglecteds, and the vicious positive feedback loop between scientific assessment and policy making that has created a climate Frankenstein.

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Reviewing the Climate Science Special Report

by Judith Curry

Calling on CE Denizens to review the Climate Science Special Report:  nominate an official reviewer, or participate in the CE Crowdsourced Review.

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Reviewing the CCSR: Discussion thread

by Judith Curry

This post is running parallel to the post Reviewing the Climate Science Special Report (a technical post), to accommodate general discussion on the topic

Nye’s Quadrant

by Judith Curry

The scary emergence of Nye’s Quadrant in dominating the public discourse on climate change.

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A ‘Red Team’ Exercise Would Strengthen Climate Science

by Judith Curry

Put the ‘consensus’ to a test, and improve public understanding, though an open and adversarial process. – Steve Koonin

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Discussion thread: reactions to House Hearing

by Judith Curry

Climate Feedback has interviewed a number of scientists regarding the recent House Hearing on climate science.

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Science needs reason to be trusted

by Judith Curry

Two excellent articles about science, facts, and post-factualism.

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House Science Committee Hearing

by Judith Curry

My testimony at the House Science Committee Hearing on Climate Science: Assumptions, Policy Implications and the Scientific Method.

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Advocacy research, incentives and the practice of science

by Judith Curry

There is a problem with the practice of science. Because of poor scientific practices, and improper incentives, few papers with useful scientific findings are published in leading journals. The problem appears to be growing due to funding for advocacy research.

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The Denialism Frame

by Andy West

An inadequately testable and inappropriate framing.

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Insights from Karl Popper: how to open the deadlocked climate debate

by Larry Kummer, from the Fabius Maximus website.

Many factors have frozen the public policy debate on climate change, but none more important than the disinterest of both sides in tests that might provide better evidence — and perhaps restart the discussion. Even worse, too little thought has been given to the criteria for validating climate science theories (aka their paradigm) and the models build upon them.

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On distinguishing disbelief and nonbelief

by Judith Curry

It is important to distinguish between disbelief and nonbelief– between believing a sentence is false and merely not believing it true. 

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How scientists fool themselves – and how they can stop

“Science is an ongoing race between our inventing ways to fool ourselves, and our inventing ways to avoid fooling ourselves.” – Saul Perlmutter

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The adversarial method versus Feynman integrity

by Judith Curry

If you think about the costs I’ll pay for raising these concerns, including the cost of damaged relationships with people that I like, I think you will conclude that a personal commitment to science is the only thing that could be big enough to offset these costs. – Paul Romer

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The method of multiple working hypotheses

by Judith Curry

With this method the dangers of parental affection for a favorite theory can be circumvented. – T.C. Chamberlin

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What would Charles Keeling think? Science in spite of politics

by Judith Curry

Perhaps my experience in studying the Earth, initially with few restrictions and later with increasingly sophisticated interaction with government sponsors and various planning committees, will provide a perspective on this great transition from science being primarily an intellectual pastime of private persons to its present status as a major contributor to the quality of human life and the prosperity of nations. – Charles Keeling

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Sagan’s baloney detection rules

by Judith Curry

On this 80th anniversary of Carl Sagan’s birthday.

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Words of wisdom from Charles Lyell

by Judith Curry

We are also told of general catastrophes and a succession of deluges, of the alternation of periods of repose and disorder, of the refrigeration of the globe, and of the sudden annihilation of whole races of animals and plants, and other hypotheses, in which we see the ancient spirit of speculation revived, and a desire manifested to cut, rather than patiently to untie, the Gordian knot. – Charles Lyell

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Why scientists should talk to philosophers

by Judith Curry

The divorce between philosophers and scientists is fairly recent.  Its time for a reconciliation.

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The sociology of correlation and causation

by Judith Curry

Correlation doesn’t imply  causation.

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Evidence of absence versus absence of evidence

By Judith Curry

Does global warming make extreme weather events worse?

 

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Habits of a complex mind

by Judith Curry

How to go from reductionist thinking to action based complexity research. 

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