Category Archives: History

The Rise and Fall of Central England Temperatures: Part II

by Tony Brown

This article examines the continued cooling of CET this century

  • Looks at a similar scenario of regional cooling in America
  • Examines CET related urbanisation issues, and the current Met office allowances for this
  • Notes the centuries long general warming of our climate.
  • Notes considerable English seasonal variability over the centuries
  • Examines the key component parts of the weather that affect the British Isles
  • Queries whether wind direction, strength and longevity are major factors in shaping our climate over the centuries.

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The Republic of Science

by Judith Curry

The professional standards of science must impose a framework of discipline and at the same time encourage rebellion against it. – Michael Polanyi (1962)

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George Washington’s winters

by Judith Curry

Frozen rivers, knee-deep snows, sleet, frigid temperatures, and other winter miseries helped shape the story of George Washington’s life.

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History and the limits of the climate consensus

by Judith Curry

Acknowledging the science of global warming does not require accepting that it is immune to criticism.

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The Intermittent Little Ice Age

by Tony Brown

Is our popular understanding of the ‘Little Ice Age’ (LIA) correct, as being a predominantly cold era lasting 500 years, leavened by a few brief warm spells?

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What would Charles Keeling think? Science in spite of politics

by Judith Curry

Perhaps my experience in studying the Earth, initially with few restrictions and later with increasingly sophisticated interaction with government sponsors and various planning committees, will provide a perspective on this great transition from science being primarily an intellectual pastime of private persons to its present status as a major contributor to the quality of human life and the prosperity of nations. – Charles Keeling

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‘Scientist’: the evolving story of a word

by Judith Curry

Tracing the acceptance or rejection of “scientist” among researchers not only gives us a history of a word—it also provides insight into the self-image of scientific researchers in the English-speaking world in a time when the social and cultural status of “science” was undergoing tremendous changes. – Melinda Baldwin

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The case for blunders

by Judith Curry

Science is not concerned only with things that we understand. The most exciting and creative parts of science are concerned with things that we are still struggling to understand. Wrong theories are not an impediment to the progress of science. They are a central part of the struggle. – Freeman Dyson

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An energy model for the future, from the 12th century

by Judith Curry

So, are you wondering what we can learn about energy policy from the 12th century?

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‘Noticeable’ climate change

by Tony Brown

Climate changes. How often? In what direction? What is actually meant by ‘climate change?’ Is the current definition useful?

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The inevitable climate catastrophe

by Judith Curry

What can we learn from climate of the 17th century about future climate catastrophes?

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Historic Variations in Arctic sea ice. Part II: 1920-1950

by Tony Brown

Satellite observations that provide an hour by hour picture of every part of the Arctic make it easy to forget that large areas of it had not even been even explored 80 years ago – let alone its ice extent minutely observed.  This paper explores the controversy surrounding the period 1920-1950, which was a period of substantial warming in the Arctic.

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Historical perspective on the Russian heat wave

by Paul Farquharson

From about the fifth century A.D. onwards,  the Western tradition of history writing preserves abundant descriptions of weather and climate phenomena in sources such as Chronicles,  Annals and Histories.  If this material is left out of our understanding and memory of climate,  then contemporary extreme events may be mistaken for unique or unprecedented events.

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Love your monsters

by Judith Curry

The Case for Modernization as the Road to Salvation

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The long, slow thaw?

by Tony Brown

A warming trend can be observed from 1659, the start date of Central England Temperature  (CET)- the oldest instrumental record in the world- to today.  It would be a notable coincidence if the warming started at the exact point that this record began. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct CET from its current start point, through the use of diverse historical records, to 1538, in order to see if the commencement of this centuries long warming trend can be identified from within this time frame.

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Climate crises: half a millennium ago

by Judith Curry

[A] key message within Gore’s Climate Reality Project was that our recent strange weather and accompanying social problems are inextricably linked to the climate crisis. And say what you will about Gore, that part seems increasingly true. What’s more, there’s nothing new about such cause-and-effect. According to a new study, climate change has played a significant role in several of the  crises of pre-industrial Europe and the rest of the Northern Hemisphere over the course of the 300 years.

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America’s First Global Warming Debate

by Judith Curry

So, when do you think America’s first climate debate took place, and who were the participants?  Here is a hint:

As the tumultuous century was drawing to a close, the conservative Yale grad challenged the sitting vice president’s ideas about global warming. The vice president, a cerebral Southerner, was planning his own run for the presidency, and the fiery Connecticut native was eager to denounce the opposition party.

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Historic variations in sea levels. Part 1: From the Holocene to Romans

by Tony Brown

The IPCC AR4 projected sea level rise in 2100 to range from 18-59 cm, depending on  the emission scenario.  More recent projections are for a 1 m sea level rise in 2100 [here and here].  Apart from the issue of uncertainty and reliability of these future sea level projections, how do these magnitudes of sea level rise compare with historic variations in sea level rise?

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