Monthly Archives: September 2010

Frames and Narrative in Climate Science

by Judith Curry

There is much angst in the climate community over effective public communication of climate science.  Strategies such as framing, messaging and narrative are receiving increasing attention by the climate establishment.  The current ideas seem to be focused on “climate distruption” and framing the problem in terms of human health impacts. I can only hope that an uncertainty frame is ascendant.

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Role of scientists in communicating climate science

by Judith Curry

Communicating climate science to the public is a substantial challenge, owing to the complexity of the subject, its potential socioeconomic consequences, and the politicization of the issue.

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No consensus on consensus

by Judith Curry

Towards providing a robust scientific basis for climate policy, the United Nations initiated a scientific consensus building process under the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC), which consisted of an intergovernmental multidisciplinary panel of experts.

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Climate book shelf

by Judith Curry

Over the last few months, I’ve received copies of several books on the topic of climate:

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The Uncertainty Monster

by Judith Curry

Notions of uncertainty range from everyday usage in common parlance to specific definitions appearing in the philosophical and scientific literature.

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Pakistan on my mind

by Judith Curry and Peter Webster

The 2010 Pakistan floods began in July 2010 following following a series of heavy monsoon rains in the northern part of the country.

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Recent challenges to the credibility of climate science

The unauthorized release of emails from the Climate Research Unit (CRU) at the University of East Anglia initiated extensive public scrutiny on climate research.

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Doubt

by Judith Curry

Well, I hope that everyone is having difficulty in classifying “Climate Etc.”, it is definitely my intention to defy classification by the norms of the climate blogosphere.  Over the past four months, I have been labeled as a warmist , lukewarmer , skeptic , confusionist, and notorious (!) denier (posted here, but since deleted).

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Hurricanes and global warming: 5 years post Katrina

by Judith Curry

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season saw hurricane activity and devastation that was unprecedented in the historical record.

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Welcome to Climate Etc.

This blog provides a forum for the exchange of ideas about climate science and the science-policy interface.  Climate Etc. is envisioned as a gathering place for climate researchers, academics and technical experts from other fields, citizen scientists, and the interested public. Open minds and critical thinking are required, and stimulating discussion and group learning is expected.

My engagement in the blogosphere over the past several years have convinced me that the blogosphere has untapped potential for educating the public and for enabling large-scale collective intelligence to address the scientific and policy challenges associated with climate change.

The climate blogosphere is a vibrant environment but the signal is often hidden by the noise.  Towards separating the signal from the noise, Climate Etc. will experiment with different formats.  To start, Climate Etc. will try three different types of threads, with different types and levels of moderation:

•  Technical threads, written by myself or a guest or crowd sourced, with moderated comments that are expected to advance the technical dialogue.  The idea is to have a focused and snark-free environment in which academics and other technical experts with little or no blogging experience will feel comfortable engaging with the broader community.

•  Commentary threads, on topical issues related to the climate science-policy interface and the philosophy, sociology, and politics of science and its institutions. Comments will be moderated for netiquette and lightly moderated for relevance and excessive length.

•  Open threads, with comments moderated only for netiquette and length, which can include a less formal discussion of topics on the technical threads, general observations and reflections on the dialectic, as well as bringing up new topics.  Signals will be sought for new threads and also for raising issues on currently active technical threads.  Depending on traffic, a new open thread will be started weekly.

I look forward to your reactions, opinions, suggestions, and ideas. Please check out the blog rules before posting your comment.  Any advice (technical, moderation, etc.) from veteran bloggers would be most appreciated. Thank you for your participation!

On this thread, please limit your comment to 250 words or less and not more than 2 links.