Monthly Archives: August 2014

Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week

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Partisanship and silencing science

by Judith Curry

 The implications of dogmatic groupthink and intimidation for the pursuit of sound science — and sound policy — are chilling. – Christopher Snowden

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Atlantic vs Pacific vs AGW

by Judith Curry

I hope this will lead to a broader discussion about the contribution of natural variability to local climate trends and to the statistics of extreme events. – John Michael Wallace

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The 50-50 argument

by Judith Curry

Pick one:

a)  Warming since 1950 is predominantly (more than 50%)  caused by humans.

b)  Warming since 1950 is predominantly caused by natural processes.

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Continue reading

JC interview with oilprice.com

by Judith Curry

As the global warming debate increases in its intensity we find both sides deeply entrenched, hurling accusations and lies at one another in an attempt to gain the upper hand. This divide within the scientific community has left the public wondering who can be trusted to provide them with accurate information and answers. – James Stafford

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Cause of hiatus found deep in the Atlantic Ocean

by Judith Curry

Rapid warming in the last three decades of the 20th century, they found, was roughly half due to global warming and half to the natural Atlantic Ocean cycle that kept more heat near the surface. When observations show the ocean cycle flipped, the current began to draw heat deeper into the ocean, working to counteract human-driven warming. – Chen and Tung

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No bodies

by Rud Istvan

One of the firmer catastrophic anthropogenic global warming (CAGW) predictions made by IPCC AR4 WG2 was an alarming increase in species extinctions.

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Institutionalizing Dissent

by Judith Curry

As many have argued, rigorous scientific research requires dissent, or what Robert Merton called “organized skepticism”. Yet it is increasingly the case that some forms of dissent in pharmaceutical research are either absent or unheard. – Justin Biddle

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Open thread

by Judith Curry

It’s your turn to introduce topics for discussion.

Mann vs Steyn et al. discussion thread

by Judith Curry

Some interesting developments during the past week.

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Appeals to the climate consensus can give the wrong impression

by Will Howard

“Consensus” means different things to different people — and herein lies the problem.

 

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A precautionary tale: more sorry than safe(?)

by Judith Curry

The unfortunate reality is that efforts to regulate one risk can create other, often more dangerous risks. – Jonathan Adler

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

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Engagement vs communication vs PR vs propaganda

by Judith Curry

So, exactly what are we trying to communicate, and how and why?

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Importance of intellectual and political diversity in science

by Judith Curry

“He who knows only his own side of the case, knows little of that.”  – John Stuart Mill

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Role of Atlantic warming(?) in recent climate shifts

by Judith Curry

Record breaking trade winds may have led to hiatus in global surface average temperatures.

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Is the road to scientific hell paved with good moral intentions?

by Judith Curry

We find ourselves in scientific hell when we discover that our powers of persuasion are limited to those who were already predisposed to agree with us. – Philip Tetlock

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Kardashian Index

by Judith Curry

I am concerned that phenomena similar to that of Kim Kardashian may also exist in the scientific community. I think it is possible that there are individuals who are famous for being famous.  – Neil Hall

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Continue reading

Montgomery’s Senate testimony: economics of climate adaptation

by Judith Curry

If we really want to help globally, there is clear evidence that most can be accomplished through effective support at a community level for locally-designed and implemented adaptation measures in Africa and poor Asian countries where the real vulnerability exists, not nugatory mitigation that helps no one. – W. David Montgomery

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