Monthly Archives: January 2015

Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

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Climate psychology’s consensus bias

by Andy West

Climate psychologists have for years now puzzled over public inaction on climate change and also what makes skeptics tick (or sick), apparently making little progress on these issues.

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Towards mass marketed electric vehicles

by Robert Ellison

A look at the Drift EV concept for electric vehicles.

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Open thread

by Judith Curry

It’s your turn to introduce topics for discussion.

Snowpocalypse – not

pby Judith Curry

Some reflections on the east coast U.S. snowstorm: the forecasts, their communication and the response.

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Climate change as a political process

All this talk about climate change has misled us collectively. It has made us search for a mega solution to a mega problem: it has created the impression that if we solve the problem of climate change, all other problems would also be solved. This is not the case. – Eija-Riitta Korhola

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

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Planetary boundaries, tipping points and prophets of doom

by Robert Ellison

There is a new paper that appeared last week in Science: Planetary boundaries: Guiding human development on a changing planet.

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Nonsensus about the Senate’s non consensus on climate change

by Judith Curry

On the politicization of ‘climate change’.

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Raw politics of climate change in the U.S.

by Judith Curry

President Obama’s State of the Union address, and the reactions from opposing politicians and the media, illustrate the raw politics of climate change in the U.S.

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‘Most’ versus ‘more than half’ versus ‘> 50%’

by Judith Curry

Seeking once again to clarify the problems in communicating the IPCC climate change attribution statements.

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week

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‘Warmest year’, ‘pause’, and all that

by Judith Curry

So, was 2014 the ‘warmest year’?  Drum roll . . .

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What would Charles Keeling think? Science in spite of politics

by Judith Curry

Perhaps my experience in studying the Earth, initially with few restrictions and later with increasingly sophisticated interaction with government sponsors and various planning committees, will provide a perspective on this great transition from science being primarily an intellectual pastime of private persons to its present status as a major contributor to the quality of human life and the prosperity of nations. – Charles Keeling

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Charlie: Challenging free speech

by Judith Curry

In response to the tragic shootings at the headquarters of satirical weekly magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, there have been a number of provocative essays on freedom of speech.

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My interview with Mrs. Green

by Judith Curry

This is definitely among the most interesting interviews that I’ve done.

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week.

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Miskolczi discussion thread

by Judith Curry

Ferenc Miskolczi has published a new paper on the greenhouse effect that is generating substantial discussion.

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Applications of subseasonal weather forecasts

by Judith Curry

There is growing interest in the scientific, operational and applications communities in developing forecasts that fill the gap between medium range weather forecasts (up to two weeks) and seasonal forecasts (3-6 months).

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Week in review

by Judith Curry

A few things that caught my eye this past week:

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Georgia politicians cool to global warming

by Judith Curry

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution asked a dozen of the state’s top elected officials and the director of the agency tasked with the state’s environment whether they believe the globe is warming, and whether they think pollution caused by human activity is a cause.

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