Category Archives: Data and observations

The rise and fall of Central England Temperature

by Tony Brown

Over the last 15 years interesting things have been happening at CET-the world’s longest instrumental record, dating to 1660.

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400(?) years of warming

by Judith Curry

So, exactly how long has it been warming?

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Hiatus controversy: show me the data

by Judith Curry

The scientific and political controversies surrounding the hiatus have continued to heat up. Lets take a look at ALL the global temperature data sets.

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Hiatus revisionism

by Judith Curry

Some interesting new papers on the hiatus in global warming.

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Recent hiatus caused by decadal shift in Indo-Pacific heating

by Judith Curry

The hiatus lives.

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Has NOAA ‘busted’ the pause in global warming?

by Judith Curry

A new blockbuster paper published today by NOAA:

These results do not support the notion of a “slowdown” in the increase of global surface temperature.  

Color me ‘unconvinced.’

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Quantifying the anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric CO2

by Fred Haynie

I conclude that, the IPCC’s model assumptions that long-term natural net rate of accumulation is constant and anthropogenic emission rates are the only contributor to total long-term accumulation of atmospheric CO2, is false.

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Puzzle in the Atlantic

by Judith Curry

I’m scratching me head over this one.

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Taking Melbourne’s temperature

by Tom Quirke

The raw Melbourne temperature records of the Bureau of Meteorology are compared to the ACORN-Sat values. The ACORN-Sat adjustments are evaluated. This analysis shows evidence for a strong urban heat island effect.

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Temperature adjustments in Australia

by Euan Mearns

UK blogger Paul Homewood and Telegraph columnist Christopher Booker have managed to stir public interest in the veracity of adjustments made to temperature records by the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN).

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Differential temperature trends at the surface and in the lower atmosphere

by Roger Pielke Sr., Phil Klotzbach, John Christy and Dick McNider

An update is presented of the analysis of Klotzbach et al. 2009.

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Understanding Time of Observation Bias

by Zeke Hausfather

Global temperatures are adjusted to account for the effects of station moves, instrument changes, time of observation (TOBs) changes, and other factors (referred to as inhomogenities) that cause localized non-climatic biases in the instrumental record.

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Berkeley Earth: raw versus adjusted temperature data

by Robert Rohde, Zeke Hausfather, Steve Mosher

Christopher Booker’s recent piece along with a few others have once again raised the issue of adjustments to various temperature series, including those made by Berkeley Earth. And now Booker has double-downed accusing people of fraud and Anthony Watts previously insinuated that adjustments are somehow criminal .

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‘Warmest year’, ‘pause’, and all that

by Judith Curry

So, was 2014 the ‘warmest year’?  Drum roll . . .

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Spinning the ‘warmest year’

by Judith Curry

The buzz is intensifying about 2014 possibly being the warmest year globally in the historical temperature record.

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Challenges to understanding the role of the ocean in climate science

by Carol Anne Clayson

A significant area of uncertainty in climate science and one of the biggest limitations on our ability to predict the timing, location and impacts of climate change is our limited understanding of ocean processes and their interactions with the atmosphere, land, and ice systems.

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How long is the pause?

by Judith Curry

UPDATE:  comments on McKitrick’s paper

With 39 explanations and counting, and some climate scientists now arguing that it might last yet another decade, the IPCC has sidelined itself in irrelevance until it has something serious to say about the pause and has reflected on whether its alarmism is justified, given its reliance on computer models that predicted temperature rises that have not occurred.Rupert Darwall 

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Are the deep oceans cooling?

by Judith Curry

Direct determination of changes in oceanic heat content over the last 20 years are not in conflict with estimates of the radiative forcing, but the uncertainties remain too large to rationalize e.g., the apparent “pause” in warming. – Wunsch and Heimbach

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Understanding adjustments to temperature data

by Zeke Hausfather

There has been much discussion of temperature adjustment of late in both climate blogs and in the media, but not much background on what specific adjustments are being made, why they are being made, and what effects they have. Adjustments have a big effect on temperature trends in the U.S., and a modest effect on global land trends. The large contribution of adjustments to century-scale U.S. temperature trends lends itself to an unfortunate narrative that “government bureaucrats are cooking the books”.

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NCDC responds to concerns about surface temperature data set

Our algorithm is working as designed. – NOAA NCDC

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Skeptical of skeptics: is Steve Goddard right?

by Judith Curry

Skeptics doing what skeptics do best . . . attack skeptics.Suyts

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The inconvenient Southern Hemisphere

by Judith Curry

Given the new information now available from the Southern Hemisphere, climate scientists must consider a larger role for natural climate variability in contributing to global temperature changes over the past millennium. – Kim Cobb

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Curry versus Trenberth

by Judith Curry

At the Conference for World Affairs, in Boulder Colorado.

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Berkeley Earth Global

by Steve Mosher

We’ve completed the first draft of our global monthly product.

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Ocean heat content uncertainties

by Judith Curry

Central to arguments related to the hiatus and the ‘missing heat’ is the assertion that unusual amounts of heat are being stored in the deep ocean, and that this heat will eventually reappear at the surface.  Exactly how good is the ocean heat content data on which this argument is based?

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