Category Archives: Communication

UK MSM on climate sensitivity

by Judith Curry

If climate scientists were credit-rating agencies, climate sensitivity would be on negative watch. But it would not yet be downgraded. – The Economist

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Forthcoming Congressional Hearing

The U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Environment of the Committee on Science, Space & Technology is holding a Hearing this Wed on “Policy Relevant Climate Issues in Context.”  Witnesses:

  • Bjorn Lomborg
  • Judith Curry
  • William Chameides

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Spinning the climate model – observation comparison

by Judith Curry

In the past 6 months or so, we have seen numerous different plots of the CMIP5 climate model simulations versus observations.

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The horsemeat argument

by Judith Curry

So, what does the UK scandal involving horsemeat in lasagna have to do with climate change?

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Cli-Fi

by Judith Curry

There is a fledgling new genre in fiction.

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The Goldilocks Principle

by Judith Curry

On what we can learn from Goldilocks and The Three Bears regarding our perceptions of climate, climate science, communication and policy.

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Never look a polar bear in the eye

by Judith Curry

Advocates and scientists have tied the Earth’s fate to that of the polar bear. But what happens if this lumbering giant proves more resilient than the rest of us? – Zac Unger

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Why climate disasters might not increase concern about climate change

by Judith Curry

Climate change awareness is complex and strongly mediated by socially constructed attitudes.  It is important to recognise that many of the social and cultural obstacles to belief are not removed by major impacts and may, indeed, be reinforced. – George Marshall

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Policy, rhetoric and public bewilderment

by Judith Curry

Science is the most formidable intellectual force of our age, perhaps any age. The irony is that, without the insights of the humanities, it may still find itself without words. – Mark Thompson

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Should scientists promote results over process?

by Judith Curry

Science is the most powerful tool we have for understanding the natural world. Its power stems from the very nuance that forceful slogans typically gloss over. But with this power comes great liability: the potential to be wrong. – Tania Lombrozo

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Italian seismologists: guilty(?)

by Judith Curry

Six Italian scientists and an ex-government official have been sentenced to six years in prison over the 2009 deadly earthquake in L’Aquila. – BBC

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Sunday Mail . . . again

by Judith Curry

The MSM and blogosphere are still roiling over David Rose’s article last Sunday, here is the latest, including a new article by David Rose.

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Communicating uncertainties in natural hazards research

by Judith Curry

Tell me what you know.  Tell me what you don’t know.  Then tell me what you think.  Always distinguish which is which. – Colin Powell

Why communicate science?

by Judith Curry

Don’t think you need to teach the public a lot of science facts. Instead, show what science is, what it means, why we need it. Find a way to have a presence. Choose what to comment on, how to be involved, and what actions and issues to engage in. Be a source of wisdom. – Carl Safina

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What are blogs good for anyways?

by Judith Curry

We are starting to see blog discourse making it into academic papers, being the subject of presentations and conference sessions, and the development of blogs specifically to analyze the dynamics of other blogs.  So, lets address the question raised in the recent presentation by Franziska Hollender:

What are blogs good for anyways?

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The ‘hard won’ consensus

by Judith Curry

The extent to which a consensus is “hard won” can be understood to depend on the personal qualities of the participating experts.” Brent Ranalli

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Rhetoric and rafts

by Judith Curry

The warning signals from the planet are clear. Now is the moment for our commu- nity to adopt the rallying cry of sea kayakers confronted with conditions too challenging to handle alone: “Time to raft up!”. – Chris Rapley

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Just the facts, please

by Judith Curry

“Get your facts first; then you can distort them as you please” – Mark Twain

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Gamesmanship

by Judith Curry

“Extreme Event Learning Through Serious Fun”– a completely new way of engaging with the risks of climate change impacts and how we manage them.

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Climate science in public schools

by Judith Curry

How the controversy over climate change affects America’s classrooms is receiving increasing attention.

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Climate change cartoons

by Judith Curry

Taking climate change seriously doesn’t mean you cannot joke about it. That’s the idea behind the exhibition Facing the Climate where Swedish cartoonists have their take at one of our time’s greatest challenges. 

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Perils of apocalyptic thinking

by Judith Curry

The last time apocalyptic anxiety spilled into the mainstream to the extent that it altered the course of history — during the Reformation — it relied on a revolutionary new communications technology: the printing press. In a similar way, could the current surge in apocalyptic anxiety be attributed in part to our own revolution in communications technology?

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Demon Coal

by Judith Curry

Last week I conducted an extensive interview with Max Allen of the Canadian Broadcast Corporation.

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Should we tell the whole truth about climate change?

by Judith Curry

In principle, yes of course.  In practice, many journalists, scientists and government officials are not so certain as to how to balance telling the whole truth and being truthful in an “effective” way.

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Teaching (?) the controversy

by Judith Curry

One of the most important issues raised by the Heartland affair is what should be taught to students in K-12.   On the one hand, we have the efforts of the NCSE (where Peter Gleick was a board member).  On the other hand, Heartland is funding David Wojick to develop curricula that teaches the controversy.

So, should we teach the consensus, the controversy, or none of the above?

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