Yearly Archives: 2010

Climate Etc.’s greatest “hits” for 2010

by Judith Curry

Climate Etc.’s first post was on Sept 2, 2010.  Since then, there have been 82 posts and over 26,000 comments.  The WordPress stats counter provides all sorts of interesting information. Which posts do you think got the largest number of hits?

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Sociology of scientists discussion thread

by Judith Curry

This thread is “linky not thinky” on my part.  Over the past week, there have been some very interesting posts in the blogosphere that can be loosely grouped under a topic of “sociology of scientists,” many of which are relevant to previous Climate Etc. threads.

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Climate Feedbacks: Part I

by Judith Curry

Everybody talks about climate feedbacks, but what are they, really?  And where did the expression ΔTs = λRF actually come from?

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Scenarios: 2010-2030: Part II

Part I introduced the challenges of climate prediction on decadal scales, specifically in the context of global climate model simulations. On the Part I thread, Paul_K writes:

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Climate Etc. holiday wishes

by Judith Curry

My very best wishes to you and your families for the winter holidays, whichever one you might celebrate.  Some climate funnies for the season:

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Scenarios: 2010-2030. Part I

by Judith Curry

On the time scale of a few decades ahead, regional variations in weather patterns and climate will be strongly influenced by natural internal variability. The potential applications of high resolution decadal climate change predictions are described in this CLIVAR doc.  Based upon my own interaction with decision makers, I see a need on these time scales that is primarily associated with infrastructure decisions.  Sectors that seem particularly interested in predictions on this time timescale are city and regional planners, the military, and the financial sector.

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Washington update: science integrity

by Judith Curry

Over the past week, there have been several notable events on the “Hill” of relevance to U.S. science policy, addressing issues of concern related to the integrity of science.  In a word, Bravo!

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