Search Results for: psychology

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye these past few weeks

How epidemiologists try to fool us with flawed statistical practices

by S. Stanley Young and Warren Kindzierski Climate Etc. recently carried several insightful posts about How we fool ourselves. One of the posts – Part II: Scientific consensus building – was right on the money given our experience! The post pointed out that… ‘researcher degrees … Continue reading

Climate scientists’ pre-traumatic stress syndrome

by Judith Curry It’s getting worse.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Can religiosity predict cultural climate beliefs?

by Andy West Probing the relationship between religiosity globally, and cultural beliefs in the narrative of imminent / certain global climate catastrophe: Post 1 of 3.

Climate science’s ‘masking bias’ problem

by Judith Curry How valid conclusions often lay hidden within research reports, masked by plausible but unjustified conclusions reached in those reports.  And how the IPCC institutionalizes such masking errors in climate science.

Legacy of Climategate – 10 years later

by Judith Curry My reflections on Climategate 10 years later, and also reflections on my reflections of 5 years ago.

Energy Security and Grid Resilience

by Judith Curry Diversifying and securing energy supplies nationally and locally.

The perils of ‘near-tabloid science’

by Judith Curry A remarkable essay by  esteemed oceanographer Carl Wunsch.

Climate scientists’ motivated reasoning

by Judith Curry Insights into the motivated reasoning of climate scientists, including my own efforts to sort out my own biases and motivated reasoning following publication of the Webster et al. (2005) paper

National Climate Assessment: A crisis of epistemic overconfidence

by Judith Curry “You can say I don’t believe in gravity. But if you step off the cliff you are going down. So we can say I don’t believe climate is changing, but it is based on science.” – Katherine … Continue reading

Sea level rise: what’s the worst case?

by Judith Curry Draft of article to be submitted for journal publication.

Innate Skepticism

by Andy West On the origin of public skepticism and its entanglement with science.

The troubled institution of science

by Judith Curry “Is the point of research to make other professional academics happy, or is it to learn more about the world?” —Noah Grand, sociology professor, UCLA “Science, I had come to learn, is as political, competitive, and fierce a … Continue reading

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Climate psychology’s consensus bias

by Andy West Climate psychologists have for years now puzzled over public inaction on climate change and also what makes skeptics tick (or sick), apparently making little progress on these issues.

Climate Heretic: to be or not to be?

by Judith Curry On experts, lukewarmers, and unhappy heretics.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Scientists & identity-protective cognition

by Judith Curry Dan Kahan has an interesting blog post on scientists and motivated reasoning.

The Denialism Frame

by Andy West An inadequately testable and inappropriate framing.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Politics and the Changing Norms of Science

by Lucas Bergkamp  “The politician is sometimes tempted to encroach on the normal territory of the scientific estate. In such issues the problem is less often whether politics will presume to dictate to science than it is how much politics … Continue reading

The Republic of Science

by Judith Curry The professional standards of science must impose a framework of discipline and at the same time encourage rebellion against it. – Michael Polanyi (1962)