‘Pause’ discussion thread

by Judith Curry

The latest data release from HadCRUT4 is creating quite a stir.

David Rose has published a provocative article in the Daily Mail entitled Global warming stopped 16 years ago, reveals Met Office report quietly released . . . and here is the chart to prove it.    The two main people that were interviewed were myself and Phil Jones.   Here is the meat of the article in terms of my and Phil Jones’ statements:

‘The new data confirms the existence of a pause in global warming,’ Professor Judith Curry, chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Science at America’s Georgia Tech university, told me yesterday. 

‘Climate models are very complex, but they are imperfect and incomplete. Natural variability  [the impact of factors such as long-term temperature cycles in the oceans and the output of the sun] has been shown over the past two decades to have a magnitude that dominates the greenhouse warming effect. 

‘It is becoming increasingly apparent that our attribution of warming since 1980 and future projections of climate change needs to consider natural internal variability as a factor of fundamental importance.’

Professor Phil Jones, director of the Climate Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, who found himself at the centre of the ‘Climategate’ scandal over leaked emails three years ago, would not normally be expected to agree with her. Yet on two important points, he did.

The data does suggest a plateau, he admitted, and without a major El Nino event – the sudden, dramatic warming of the southern Pacific which takes place unpredictably and always has a huge effect on global weather – ‘it could go on for a while’.

Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also admitted that the climate models were imperfect: ‘We don’t fully understand how to input things like changes in the oceans, and because we don’t fully understand it you could say that natural variability is now working to suppress the warming. We don’t know what natural variability is doing.’

Yet he insisted that 15 or 16 years is not a significant period: pauses of such length had always been expected, he said. 

Yet in 2009, when the plateau was already becoming apparent and being discussed by scientists, he told a colleague in one of the Climategate emails: ‘Bottom  line: the “no upward trend” has to  continue for a total of 15 years before we get worried.’

But although that point has now been passed, he said that he hadn’t changed his mind about the  models’ gloomy predictions:  ‘I still think that the current decade which began in 2010 will be warmer by about 0.17 degrees than the previous one, which was warmer than the Nineties.’

Only if that did not happen would he seriously begin to  wonder whether something more profound might be happening. In other words, though five years ago he seemed to be saying that 15 years without warming would make him ‘worried’, that period has now become 20 years.

Meanwhile, his Met Office  colleagues were sticking to their guns. A spokesman said: ‘Choosing a starting or end point on short-term scales can be very misleading. Climate change can only be detected from multi-decadal timescales due to the inherent variability in the climate system.’

He said that for the plateau to last any more than 15 years was ‘unlikely’. Asked about a prediction that the Met Office made in 2009 – that three of the ensuing five years would set a new world temperature record – he made no comment. With no sign of a strong El Nino next year, the prospects of this happening are remote.

Overall, I would say that this is a very good article; I think the exchange between me and Jones, mediated by Rose, is an important one.  However, I am not happy with this statement in the early part of the article:

Some climate scientists, such as Professor Phil Jones, director of the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, last week dismissed the significance of the plateau, saying that 15 or 16 years is too short a period from which to draw conclusions.

Others disagreed. Professor Judith Curry, who is the head of the climate science department at America’s prestigious Georgia Tech university, told The Mail on Sunday that it was clear that the computer models used to predict future warming were ‘deeply flawed’.

I have no idea where the ‘deeply flawed’ came from, I did not use these words in any context that Rose should be quoted (perhaps I used them somewhere on my blog?)  Also, I agree that 16 years is too short,  given the timescales of the PDO and AMO, to separate out natural versus anthropogenic variability (but this cuts both ways:  the warming period between 1980 and 1998 was arguably amped by the PDO and AMO).   And while I am griping, why did he have to use that photo that makes me look like a gorgon :( .

Here is the text I emailed Rose, in response to his questions:

The data confirms the existence of a ‘pause’ in the warming. The impact of this pause within the climate dynamic community has been to focus increased attention on the impact of natural variability, particularly the impact of internal multi-decadal oscillations in the ocean.  The new climate model calculations for the AR5 have focused on trying to assess what it would take to accurately simulate these multi-decadal ocean oscillations and how predictable they might be.  These new observations and climate modeling results will hopefully impact the the IPCC AR5 deliberations so that we do not see the same overly confident consensus statements that we saw in the AR4.  
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You might be interested in my recent blog post:
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The flawed assumption behind the orthodoxy was that natural variability is merely ‘noise’ superimposed on the long term trend.  The natural variability has been shown over the past two decades to have a magnitude that dominates the greenhouse warming signal.  It is becoming increasingly apparent that our attribution of warming since 1980 and future projections of climate change needs to consider natural internal variability as a factor of fundamental importance.  I sincerely hope that the AR5 provides an assessment of what we know and what we don’t know and areas of disagreement, rather than trying to manufacture a consensus.  
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Climate models are very complex, but they are imperfect and incomplete.  In that context the problem is how people interpret the simulations from climate models in view of the uncertainties and imperfections.

The UK Met Office has responded to Rose’s article with this statement.

For context on this issue, see these previous Climate Etc. posts:

725 responses to “‘Pause’ discussion thread

  1. Please, Daily Mail, buy a photographer worth his silver salts.
    ======

    • Yeah, sure, Churchill; but no cigar?
      ========

    • Joe's World(progressive evolution)

      Kim,

      I keep wondering what these scientists have been smoking to keep pushing garbage they do not understand nor do they want to understand.
      It would take a completely different approach to science that would jeopardize their standing in the “peer” community and grants they receive from the government that they also consult with.

      The oscillation and temperature data gathering approach is insane as they miss many areas of facts such as their is no actual true oscillation as the planet and solar system is in constant change. If they were exactly repeating then this approach would be correct….but…

  2. Oh yes, we have no banomalies; banalities, we’ve got bunches.
    ===============

  3. > Physics is like sex; sure, you can get some interesting results, but that’s not why we do it.

    – Richard Feynman

  4. After how many years of no warming does it take to be significant? Depends….when does Phil retire?

    • > Also, I agree that 16 years is too short, given the timescales of the PDO and AMO, to separate out natural versus anthropogenic variability (but this cuts both ways: the warming period between 1980 and 1998 was arguably amped by the PDO and AMO).

      – Judith Curry, who does not look happy after David’s charming twist of events

      • It means that Judith Curry will now suffer the rath of those that push radical agendas,and those that profit from it.
        What does this say for Barak Hussein Obamas use of climate warming to push his agenda of cap and trade and other unfair and wastful policy.

      • Look, a squirrel that might be born in Kenya.

      • Ok, true, but if you’re tempted to repeat this elsewhere, you’ll look less illiterate if you spell “wrath” and “wasteful” right. Oh, and it’s “Obama’s” not “Obamas”.

    • There’s an interesting discussion that begins to shed light on that question in http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcrut4/HadCRUT4_accepted.pdf .. which is a discussion by the authors of the curve in question of their work and their process.

      Taking into account what they say, we can pretty definitively tell in about two decades from now whether there actually was warming on any present date, nineteen times in twenty, to 95% confidence.

      A Bayesian will then tell you, depending on your prior beliefs, whether that warming (or no warming) is significant (http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~murphyk/Bayes/bayesrule.html).

      • Bart, shouldn’t that be from 1997 and we need but 4 more years not twenty? And that does not include the probabilities to test are the claim that GHG forcing is about 0.2C per decade. Your model would be for a zero trend. The claim is 0.2C per decade. Ch10 of AR4 indicates that we are well outside at the 1997 date for the magnitude of warming expected by 2030. Since the attribution of the effect of CO2 was estimating the magnitude of natural variability and assigning the remainder to GHG’s, the results indicate that the CS has been over predicted.

      • johnfpittman | October 15, 2012 at 8:42 am |

        You ask excellent questions.

        We can tell a good deal about a dataset in terms of derived descriptors, such as trend or rise or confidence interval or significance, find points of inflexion and fit curves, with enough data and good technique, but we will never be able to fully remove the subjective element of judgement in interpeting those derived values.

        Can we tell if 1997 was part of a rising trend? To above 80% confidence, we can, and it was for every span longer than 15 years up to about 180 years or more. If you’re satisfied with 80% confidence, I’m not going to be terribly critical of your judgement; however, I should point out that until BEST, I rejected the claim that Global Warming was confirmed by HadCRUT3 or GISSTEMP due to the confidence level being no higher than 93% on the data. BEST took it up over 97.5%, which is an astounding accomplishment given the poor quality of the improvised data (especially compared to what could have been collected).

        Cleaning up and overcoming the limits of individual bits of a dataset by statistics is one of those areas of judgement in interpreting derived values I mentioned earlier. While mathematically rigorous, not everyone accepts every method of data cleaning; BEST used seven distinct methods and compared them to each other and to objective measures. (I further used two more approximation methods of my own to check the credibility of BEST’s methods – I recommend anyone do so themselves.)

        Now, compared to BEST, HadCRUT4 is a piece of crap, but it’s a piece of crap that includes oceans, and that seems to be important to some for their interpretation, so we plow ahead with it despite its faults.

        And yes, indeed my premise is that trend is in the same direction and that trend of trend is overall rising, rather than that it compares with 0.2C/decade. Why? Because, when has it ever been 0.2C/decade for a significant span, and when was the 0.2C/decade assertion ever valid in any way? Not so much as anyone would judge meaningful. It’s a made-up number pulled out of someone’s hat. (That said, I wouldn’t be surprised where we currently in a 0.2C/decade or higher rise yet to be confirmed by future data in some future year over the next decade or two.)

        What you say about AR4 does indicate serious issues, but these issues are more of interpretation of the meaning of model projections than of the temperature dataset. (For my part, I do believe the projections get several elements wrong, probably, but also that they depend on far too low a granularity to produce fidelity to the natural systems, by up to two orders of magnitude.)

        If we interpret the model projections in a like-to-like way, for example a model including CO2E and a model without CO2E, we see that the models without CO2E fail entirely to capture any GMT rise at all. They’re too dissimilar from the actual measures to be taken seriously, and must be rejected.

        Likewise, the model projections failed on anticipating polar ice trends.. which isn’t surprising, the poles are extremely complex elements. There’s little basis to claim the models could get oceans completely right, and since poles and oceans are determiners of so much about temperature, we don’t expect great precision from the models. The models also underpredicted extreme events.

        Thinking in terms of temperature only would be missing the point. Viewing temperature as a proxy for heat, as a proxy for energy, the models do the job of correctly projecting the energy balance shift due CO2E, not the temperature rise at the surface, which after all is just a proxy for energy balance changing.

        So attribution of effect of CO2 is supported, albeit hamhandedly, by the models.

        We expect even with these considerations that about one period of up to 30 years in twenty to not rise. We expect the rising trend of periods up to about 30 years to vary between significant minimal rise and significant high rise. So we’re in one of the periods of significant minimal rise, by that interpretation? That’s not unexpected. The fact that we don’t have a significant 17-year fall tells us we aren’t even in the range of the one in twenty scarcity.

        What if we get two 17-year ‘pauses’ in a row? Or three? Well, then we have to use Bayes’ formula, before we can reject rising global warming, or even reject correlation between CO2E and temperature, at whatever level of prior belief we bring. Which again is a subjective judgement.

        Which brings us to endpoints. The ends of a curve are always troublesome to interpret. The data’s been smoothed or curves fitted to produce an image for the eye.. and part of that process involves assumptions about data we don’t have yet. While we’re less than halfway through a climate (whether you use 30 years, or the 95% proxy 17 years) from an endpoint, we’re working with implicit assumptions and should avoid putting much weight or reliance on that span in interpretation. This is universal across all graphical analyses.

        Anyone making claims about relative climates since the start of the satellite era relying only on satellite data — as we have only one 30-year climate in the 33-ish year span since the 1970′s technology was deployed (not without technical problems), and the products of the three interpretations of the satellite feeds are in mutual disagreement with each other, with all surface records, and with global effects like sea ice extent change and migratory patterns of animals changing, (we ought show even greater caution in using satellites than for the lamentable improvised surface record) is therefore on very shakey ground. The satellite data are being mismanaged, is about all we can conclude from the facts at hand.

      • Bart.. hopefully in a little bit I’ll ( actually robert ) have something to show folks about the limitations of the CRU method and the GISS method.. quite remarkable.
        Of course many people are not interested in better methods.

      • Steven Mosher, How is your station location relative to significant body of water distance coming along?

        http://berkeleyearth.lbl.gov/auto/Regional/TMIN/Figures/new-zealand-TMIN-Trend.pdf

        That would impact both Tmax and Tmin wouldn’t it?

      • Cap dallas.

        The data crunching on distance from water continues.

        Some background.

        1. You will see decreased Standard deviations as you approach a coastline. But there is no sharp cut off in the data.. Some people use
        30 or 50km as a cut off for defining a coastal station.. I’m not so sure there is a fine line of demarcation. I have a bunch of unpublished stuff. meh. maybe someday.

        2. In the current implementation of BEST we start with a regression ( think KED or Kriging with external drift ) and that regression does not explicitly model distance from water. it models lon/lat elevation with a seasonal component with the residual ( weather) put into the kriging field. With that the temperature at any given location is known to within 1.6C. I think by adding distance from water that may be reduced. Hmm my own regressions show that. However, I’d like to define more than distance from a coast.. Im talking distance from any body of water. then the size of the body of water matters as well.

        None of this will change the trends. Crap. long ago I did some work were I threw out all coastal and island locations. basic answer is the same.

        How do I make this clear to people. There ARE interesting technical questions in the land surface and SST record. But do NOT expect to find something that will

        A) change the global trend in ANY meaningful way.
        B) have any relevance to radiative physics

        Of course both sides of this debate continue to mis represent the land surface record. They either argue that its not interesting or argue that it somehow proves that AGW is false.

      • Steven Mosher, I have been using some near water with allowance for prevailing winds to look at the bucket to intake period. Looks to me like there was no glitch.

        I agree that the GAT trend shouldn’t change, I am just more interested in isolating the longer term underlying trend and the change in the diurnal range which looks to be ocean oscillation related :)

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        Bart R: BEST took it up over 97.5%, which is an astounding accomplishment given the poor quality of the improvised data (especially compared to what could have been collected).

        The BEST team have not yet “published” their work in a peer-reviewed journal, though they made it publicly available for extended peer review. Another unpublished but publicly available analysis of surface data is by Anthony Watts and team. What do you think of it? Start here and page backwards:
        http://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/watts_et_al_2012-figure20-conus-compliant-nonc-noaa.png.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler | October 15, 2012 at 1:57 pm |

        You put forward a respectable challenge.

        However, I steadfastly avoid WUWT. In my opinion, it’s unhealthy, it never improves, and it inevitably makes visitors unhappier.

        I find the censorship and moderation policies arbitrary, antagonistic and dishonest. I believe the dialogue there poisons the mind of readers. And I just don’t trust or respect the host, based on his actions.

        So I’d prefer not to give his site my slim web traffic.

        I propose in the alternative that I meet you halfway: Mr. Mosher’s doing not dissimilar (but from what I can collect clearly technically superior and more transparent) work at his own blog.

        Would you accept an appraisal of that from me?

      • BartR October 15, 2012 at 11:00 am: “What if we get two 17-year ‘pauses’ in a row? Or three?”

        We might get a re-run of the LIA. How much is the question. But, as a “precaution”, we should dump initiatives to reduce availability of fossil fuels and increase the cost of energy.

        Recall that the French Revolution happened around the bottom of the LIA; precipitation had flattened wheat crops; bread was scarce and costly. Let us not repeat history with a different driver.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        Bart R: However, I steadfastly avoid WUWT.

        We can come back to the topic if the paper gets published. I think a blanket deprecation WUWT is unwarranted.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler | October 16, 2012 at 12:53 pm |

        Since when am I a paragon of forgiveness and charity?

        I don’t expect a statue of me built with a plaque that reads, “Friend of the Mean-spirited Everywhere”.

        But if you want to prove you’re more virtuous than I, by all means let me know what you think of Mosher’s work in the sort of detail you’d hope of me about Watt’s.

      • Pooh, Dixie | October 16, 2012 at 12:02 pm |

        What day did the LIA start on?

        End?

        How much of France did it affect? By how much? What was the productivity of the French dairy region in those years? When did the Salt Tax come in? Under which French King? What were the barley harvests in those years? Wheat? Acorn? How many head of cattle went to beef? Pork production? Which wars fought? What salaries to foreeign mercenaries?

        I’d like some basis to judge this historical conformity to climate people are talking about. Can you provide it?

      • Re: Bart R | October 16, 2012 at 11:57 pm
        Don’t be ridiculous. Common knowledge. If not, look it up. French Revolution. Little Ice Age.

      • Bart, the logic of rejecting models without CO2E is impeccable, but contains an omission. It may also simply demonstrate that the representations of natural processes embedded in the models are very low quality. This, of course, renders the conclusion that CO2E is necessary invalid. I refer you to http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/02/22/omitted-variable-fraud-vast-evidence-for-solar-climate-driver-rates-one-oblique-sentence-in-ar5/ .

      • Pooh, Dixie | October 17, 2012 at 1:07 am |

        En francais s’il vous plait?

        Because I don’t think you know.

        If you did, you’d have spotted the correct question for me to have asked was about “chestnut”, not “acorn”.

        Handwaved historicism is meaningless, cannot be verified, and relies on how gullible and complicit the audience, not how skeptical and rigorous.

      • Brian H | October 17, 2012 at 5:50 pm |

        Hypotheses non fingo.

        I don’t need to give WUWT another hit of web presense to know what you claim requires feigning hypotheticals without foundation, a fallacy.

        I refer you to Newton’s Principia.

      • Français.

        S’il-vous-plaît.

      • willard (@nevaudit) | October 18, 2012 at 7:27 am |

        You evince greater regard for the French than did Mark Twain.

        And while you’re quite brilliant, Mark Twain has the quality of being brilliant and dead, which I profoundly hope you will be some time in equalling.

      • Bart R,

        Beware that John F. Pittman might not be taking your comment seriously, since he said on another thread that he needs to know your legal name to do so.

      • willard (@nevaudit) | October 15, 2012 at 8:52 am |

        Pittman and Whitman both? Or are they the same person with two different sockpuppets? Or is there some confusion of who’s who?

        One more reason I seldom concern myself with names in Climate discussion, except to use to reference published works.

        Back to ideas now.

      • Bart R,

        Sorry, I mistook the names.

        Should have checked.

        Sorry, John F.

      • Not a problem willard.

        Good write up Bart. Your post is indicative of why I get into arguments from those who claim they support AR4, and then post items in contradiction to what is stated. I especially like your point of implicit assumptions. These assumptions, such as comparing what a model states as to ECO2 wrt a model without and then doing essentially a temperature balance without taking into account start/end dates or which period to use can lead to much misunderstanding. But looking at some of the sea level and other reports such as coral bleaching, it is still on going.

        Joshua, I cannot fault the less skeptical of the skeptics when I see the IPCC graph that shows an ever increasing rate as the number of years approaches an endpoint. So those who wish to be “fair”, should consider that this cherry picking was made a big deal by the IPCC in the build up to Copenhagen. So, if these very good scientists can end up with such a graph, then it should be understandable if lessers copy them. Note some of the wording is tongue in cheek. Though, I understand that two wrongs don’t make a right, and using someone’s argument against them because it was erroneous does not make a statement correct on its own, perhaps more can realize that just because someone does not like someone else’s credentials or the manner of their prose, a valid complaint, criticism, or observation should be awarded its worth.

      • John -

        Not sure why this is directed to me in this location – but I do generally read your posts because I respect your opinion (and exchanges between you and Bart are worth reading), so I found it.

        Joshua, I cannot fault the less skeptical of the skeptics when I see the IPCC graph that shows an ever increasing rate as the number of years approaches an endpoint. So those who wish to be “fair”, should consider that this cherry picking was made a big deal by the IPCC in the build up to Copenhagen. So, if these very good scientists can end up with such a graph, then it should be understandable if lessers copy them. Note some of the wording is tongue in cheek. Though, I understand that two wrongs don’t make a right, and using someone’s argument against them because it was erroneous does not make a statement correct on its own, perhaps more can realize that just because someone does not like someone else’s credentials or the manner of their prose, a valid complaint, criticism, or observation should be awarded its worth.

        Yes, in principle, I agree with what you say there. The differences would be more quibbling than substantial.

        But to add, while I don’t fault anyone for these kinds of errors per se (we all make errors of this type due to the underlying nature of humans to be motivated reasoners) I do expect that people who don the mantle of skepticism (or the mantle of scientist) will address critical analyses in good faith and with an open mind. I don’t dismiss the potentially misleading message from graphs as you describe. A scientist should be accountable for how their work might potentially be misinterpreted (or reflect unrealized biases). By the same token, a skeptic should be accountable for the potential for uncertainties that climate scientists have acknowledged to be demagogued or dismissed. (Please note – I am not saying that skeptics are accountable for “skeptics.” – but only for how the work of scientists might potentially be “skepticized.”)

        I think that is fully fair in all respects. How about you?

      • Yes, in general, I agree Joshua. BTW, the looping was getting confusing, so I stuck it here. You know most of my specific disagreements. I will have to check to see if that iconic accelerating graph was in the summary, which I believe, or not. But, I also don’t think scientists should hide the uncertainties, while maintaining in private that they do exist. Or state the uncertainties, stick them in a handwave, and not discuss how that hand wave changes the robustness or certainty of the conclusions. How about you?

      • John -

        But, I also don’t think scientists should hide the uncertainties, while maintaining in private that they do exist. Or state the uncertainties, stick them in a handwave, and not discuss how that hand wave changes the robustness or certainty of the conclusions. How about you?

        I am in complete agreement. I don’t expect that the initial problem (hiding uncertainties) will never occur – for one reason or another (be it deliberate attempts to hide uncertainties or merely the product of motivated reasoning). When is significant (IMO) is what occurs after it happens – be it hand waving or private-only acknowledgment on the one hand, or assumption of bad faith, or willful misrepresentation and/or demagoging of what originally occurred on the other hand (that list of follow-on problems was not meant to be exclusive. A lot of other bad stuff happens as well).

  5. Cheer up, we all be chillin’.
    =======

    • No, warming is good. Chilling will be disasterous. Unfortunately, CO2 at 800ppm cannot warm up the atmosphere by 0.000000..1 degC.

  6. In all this talk of a “pause”, no mention of attribution studies such as Foster & Rahmstorf, 2011, the fact that the past 10 years were the warmest 10 year period on instrument record, or that the oceans have continued to accumulate energy? Seems a rather interesting and glaring omission if the aim was to really look at what’s happening with the climate. Overall, Mr. Rose seemed to have a decided lack of understanding what climate models can and can’t do, and what natural variability means (and how models really can’t forecast it).

    • Latimer Alder

      @r gates

      You keep on saying ‘the warmest 10 year period on record’.

      But it seems to me that this says nothing at all about the trend (warm*ing* or not, not warm*est* or not).

      Please can you explain why you think it is relevant to this discussion. Because it’s baffled me

      TIA

      • Latimer,

        A ten year period may tell you nothing about a longer trend, and indeed, if you believe Santer’s research, it may take up to 17 years to see a longer term trend. But the point is that we maintained the higher levels we established in the 1990′s, and this higher level means that the underlying forcing is still in place (as the Foster and Rahmstorf 2011 and other studies have shown). I obviously happen to believe in the underlying validity of attribution approches to looking at the full range of underlying forcing going on during any given period, and do not think it is reasonable or even possible to attempt to have the models predict short-term variablility that may be caused by factors that simply can’t be modeled. What the attribution studies have shown is that absent the increased aersols, quiet sun, and cool PDO etc. we would have been seeing a continued warming over the past 10 years, rather than just a halt to the warming. The negative forcing rougly balanced the effects of increased greenhouse gases. When the these natural variations turn the other way (and they will), we can expect the tropospheric temperatures begin to rise again…perhaps quite dramatically. This discussion says nothing by the way, about ocean heat content, which is an entirely different issue and which I’ve posted quite a bit about so I won’t go into again here.

      • Latimer Alder

        @r gates

        Sorry, but I cannot see much point to your remarks other than a very long-winded restatement of the pretty obvious proposition

        ‘if things were different they’d be different’

        or

        ‘If it weren’t for the things making the world cooler, it might be hotter’

        You’ll need to be considerably better than that if you are going to persuade many that you are right.

        So now it was the aerosols, it was the PDOs , it was the quiet sun, it was the Man in the Moon that sopped the temperature going up for sixteen years. But you didn’t tell us that sixteen years ago. It was all gungho fro Thermageddon then. Now you say that these things couldn’t have been foretold and models couldn’t predict them, but you’re quite happy with hindsight that they were the causes.

        You’ll not be surprised to know that I get a a very strong flavour that the alarmists are extremely good at supposed post-hoc rationalisation after the inconvenient facts become known. But any old fool can tell the results of a horserace when all the runners have crossed the finishing line.

    • R, Gates,

      Further to Latimer Alder’s comment, I also wonder why ‘warmest on record’ is relevant given we only have a couple of hundred years of ‘records’ but (palaeoclimate record) the major natural temperature cycles are about 1000 years and 100,000 years.

      Therefore, what is the relevance of being the hottest decade in the past 200 years, when it was hotter 1000, 2000, 5000-8000 and 100,000 years ago?

    • Is this related to the paper Tamino had on his blog where he showed if you took away all the things that he (theory) thinks caused cooling, that it actually would have warmed at a greater rate?

      • That’s Grant Foster and yes, the Foster & Rahmstorf 2011 paper was one of several recent attribution studies that clearly identified the continued underlying foricng still present but being masked by natural variations. Those who faulted climate models for not forecasting this period of natural variations tending to the cool side simply don’t understand what models can do and are designed to do.

      • The problem is with the IPCC folks that oversold the models, since they mistakenly thought that the natural variations were merely noise and would not impact trends beyond a decade.

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        Judith Curry asserts  “[some?] IPCC folks   mistakenly thought that the natural variations were merely noise and would not impact trends beyond a decade.”

        Judith Curry, surely such a strong assertion deserves citations!

        •  Who specifically are these “IPCC folks”?

        •  How specifically did they phrase this claim?

        •  In what specific context was this claim asserted?

        •  What concretely was the length-of-time ["decade"] claimed?

        •  What IPCC caveats accompanied this claim?

        •  Where specifically in the IPCC report(s) is this claim found?

        •  Upon reflection, is this overall claim a fair summary of the IPCC position?

        We look forward to clarification of this important assertion, Judith Curry! Perhaps it deserves a Climate Etc post of its own? That would be *terrific*!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • In other words what you’re saying is the models can only predict warming.

        So what are they predicting now ? Warming ? Cooling ? and when ? and how much ? Or no change ?

        The fact is the modellers only ever say their models predicted the event after the event happened and never before.

        If the models can’t predict and the modellers don’t predict, then both have no value and are useless.

      • My above comment was in reply to R Gates who said ” Those who faulted climate models for not forecasting this period of natural variations tending to the cool side simply don’t understand what models can do and are designed to do.”.

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        J Martin wrongly claims: “The fact is the modellers only ever say their models predicted the event after the event happened and never before.”

        •  Hansen and colleagues (1981): The opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.”

        •  Hansen and colleagues (2011): Acceleration of the rate of sea-level rise this decade.”

        Hansen’s predictions illustrate the four primary elements of modern climate science: the predictions arise from (1)  fundamental thermodynamical considerations, as subsequently affirmed by (2) large-scale computations, (3) laboratory experiments on small-scale systems, and (4) global-scale climate observations.

        Can denialists show *ANY* predictions to match?   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • Brandon Shollenberger

        And by “clearly identified the continued underlying foricng still present but being masked by natural variations,” what we really mean is the Foster & Rahmstorf paper did simplistic curve-fitting that shows if you remove squiggles in a line while forcing a linear component… you get a linear trend.

        Or at least, that’s what reasonable people took from the paper. I’m sure R. Gates took the paper to mean he was right because it agreed with him.

      • The Arctic situation is a function of weather and currents not co2.
        Hansen on sea levels (2011), ironic in that sea levels fell during 2011.

        Landscheidt predicted the minimum we are entering back in 1983, he predicted both the length and the depth (Maunder if memory serves me right).

        Whereas Hansen is probably glad he didn’t put his money where his mouth is and open a shop in New York selling waders and canoes.

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        J Martin, until such time as your post’s broad claims are verifiably supported by concrete citations, perhaps we should regard your memory (and Judith Curry’s memory too) as being (possibly) fallible and/or subject to a confirmation bias?

        “Trust, but verify”, eh?   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • fan,

        RE citations:

        Smiley faces and non-relevant links do not count as citations. As such I believe you provide citations for few of your comments. Why make demands on others which you fail to meet?

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        timg56 asserts  “Smiley faces and non-relevant links do not count as citations. As such I believe you provide citations for few of your comments.”

        LOL … Climate Etc readers are invited to verify that, in regard to the topic at-hand, my post [above] provided in-context, scrupulously verbatim quotes of climate-change predictions, with links provided to the multi-author peer-reviewed articles in which those predictions appeared.

        Uhhh … and then, check to see whether commenters that included J Martin, Brandon Shollenberger, timg56 (and even Judith Curry herself) put forth the effort to do the same.

        Golly!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse: You appear to have the opinion that climate science is about predictions. You raised predictions in a comment to me on an earlier thread.

        The predictions/projections are worthless if the modelers have incorrectly attributed the cause of the warming we’ve experienced. Contrary to what you believe, and that’s all you have is your belief to sustain you, the sea surface temperature, ocean heat content, lower troposphere temperature, and land+sea surface temperature records all indicate anthropogenic forcings played little to no role in the warming that has taken place in the last 30 years.

      • Brandon Shollenberger

        I don’t normally waste my time responding to people like A fan of *MORE* discourse, but since he specifically called me out:

        LOL … Climate Etc readers are invited to verify that, in regard to the topic at-hand, my post [above] provided in-context, scrupulously verbatim quotes of climate-change predictions, with links provided to the multi-author peer-reviewed articles in which those predictions appeared.

        Uhhh … and then, check to see whether commenters that included J Martin, Brandon Shollenberger, timg56 (and even Judith Curry herself) put forth the effort to do the same.

        I don’t know what delusion would make someone think I ought to have provided quotes and links to predictions when I didn’t say a word about them. Is it really a criticism of someone to say they didn’t put effort into providing references to things they aren’t discussing? Does it really make sense for A fan of *MORE* discourse to act like he is better than me because he did something I had no reason to do?

        But since he dragged me into this with his stupidity, I feel I should point out neither prediction he referenced is meaningful for the conversation that was being had. One prediction he cited was made last year, meaning it couldn’t possibly rebut what J Martin said. The other prediction was something anyone could have predicted based on common sense, so it says nothing about climate modeling.

        I hope his smileys indicate some form of trolling because I’d hate to think anyone believes this drivel.

  7. The bottom-line graphic from the Daily Mail has been manipulated. It has been shifted by 6 months.
    http://imageshack.us/a/img856/3547/hadcrut4.gif

    Lolwot also notes how the endpoints are carefully chosen to show the same level, a very clever lying-with-graphics trick.

    And of course, all the clueless right-wing news sites are picking this up without any regard for scientific verification. For instance see the front page of the Drudge Report
    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/839/drudge.gif/

    Could call this DailyGate, but general incompetence amongst the climate skeptics is a daily occurrence so that name loses some of its impact :) :)

    • Could call this DailyGate, but general incompetence amongst the climate skeptics is a daily occurrence so that name loses some of its impact

      Wouldn’t ever gain traction. Skeptics expect this kind of nonsense, and “skeptics” are completely uninterested: Their interest in incompetence is entirely selective.

      • “Their interest in incompetence is entirely selective.”

        Selectivity is a key component of all sorts of fallacious arguments, from cherry-picking to building strawmen, and to psychological tactics such as projection, transferrence, and framing.

        Doing solid science is removing selectivity. If you see that outlier in a statistical data set, you don’t ignore it. Before the advent of fat-tail statistics, these got routinely ignored, and that was actually part of freshmen physics lab courses, being allowed to throw out an outlier. But nowadays, these outliers are not ignored because they are often part of the real physical behaviors.

        Yet all these skeptical trendologists show no hesitance to manipulate or throw out any data they collect. So selectivity is really out of control, both objectively and subjectively, amongst the skeptical sect.

      • Glad you agree that AGW with all it’s cherry picking of time frames is a fallacious argument. Throwing out data as was done with Yamal is a perfect example amongst many.

      • Typed too fast. The second sentence should have been: Also, throwing out data as was done with Yamal is a perfect example amongst many of modern “scientific” usage by AGW proponents.

      • Calling David Rose incompetent presumes a malfunction.

        I see no reason to believe this is a malfunction.

        Simples.

      • I see no reason to believe this is a malfunction.

        Just trying to extend the benefit of the doubt, willard. I think it is theoretically possible a case of incompetence, although not very probable.

        But it’s what we should expect from the outrage machine – which extends beyond the media to combatants on both sides of the fence.

        What is interesting is Judith’s (once again) selective concern – to the point where she could find such problematic reporting to be “a very good article.”

        Again, what part of this nonsense:

        … Prof Jones also admitted that the climate models were imperfect…:

        fits with the descriptor of “very good?”

        Notice how Judith’s fault finding is constrained by a viewpoint that the only possible, or probable mis-reporting occurs with how what she said portrayed, and not how what Jones was portrayed.

        Odd that a scientist would apply such selective analysis.

    • The simple fact is temps have flattened out. No amount of obfuscation by clueless leftwingers like Web and lolwot can change that.
      But yes. 16 years is not very long, even if Jones once said it was. Over at Realclimate the figure of 17 years was seen as significant some months ago.

    • son of mulder

      “Lolwot also notes how the endpoints are carefully chosen to show the same level, a very clever lying-with-graphics trick.”

      Or if you are asked the question ‘For how low long has there been no warming?’, you start at the present and work back to the point where warming ended. So how is that a clever choice of start and end points? It’s just what the data tells us. Now you could argue that is a clever question. And I’d suggest that more clever questions need to be asked…. that’s what sceptics should do. And supporters of a theory need to provide rigorous scientific answers to sceptics questions not low shots like your Lolwot quote.

      • It’s slightly more serious than just picking endpoints.

        The Daily Mail has actually altered the temperature values for September 1997 and August 2012 to fit their story. They are both depicted and drawn as being exactly 0.5C.

        In the HadCRUT4 data this isn’t the case. August 2012 happens to be above 0.5C and September 1997 below 0.5C.

        I guess they are so naive that they
        a) think “trend” is defined as the difference between end and start point.
        b) noticed said “trend” was positive so adjusted the data to be 0.5C both at the start and end of the graph to fit their “no warming” story.

        Some might call that data fraud. What do you think?

      • I think that if even an out-and-out bigoted alarmist science crook like Jones agrees there’s no warming for 16 years now, then there isn’t one.

      • “lolwot | October 15, 2012 at 8:33 am | Reply

        It’s slightly more serious than just picking endpoints. “

        Ahh, very interesting. You did say to look carefully, and I didn’t look carefully enough. I do agree that it may be data fraud, as there are too many glitches for it to be benign mistakes.

        Notice how the fake skeptics such as Tomcat jump in and try to change the subject.
        “Look! squirrel!”

      • Not only Tomcat plays squirrel, but he does not seem to have read agree with Phil Jones in the main op-ed:

        > I agree that 16 years is too short, given the timescales of the PDO and AMO, to separate out natural versus anthropogenic variability (but this cuts both ways: the warming period between 1980 and 1998 was arguably amped by the PDO and AMO).

        Simples.

      • Make that:

        > Not only Tomcat plays squirrel, but he does not seem to have read that Judy agrees with Phil Jones in the main op-ed.

      • Look, a squirrel made of straw.

      • I agree that no one should be altering or adjusting data without a good reason.

      • It’s being tricksy, at the very least. The DM graph was created with WfT. Here it is done anew. To get the DM red curve, 1997 data prior to 1997.67 must be omitted.

        Why the DM shifted the red curve is beyond me.

      • Steven Mosher

        “Some might call that data fraud. What do you think?”

        Hmm.

        The rules for data fraud versus chartsmanship were clearly established in the Briffa case and the WMO case.

        In those cases, it was determined that
        If the data was actually presented correctly some other place and time that it is not fraud.

        It’s basically an “anything goes” approach, brought to you curtosy of those people who defend hiding the decline.

      • It’s basically an “anything goes” approach, brought to you curtosy of those people who defend hiding the decline.

        Oh come off it steve ;-) Trying to blame Mann and Jones and the rest for the Daily Mail? Nothing they could possibly have done justifies the existence of the Daily Mail.

      • son of mulder

        Yes they should have shown the correct start and end points and not hide anything. It isn’t fraud but certainly is deceptive. The headline and text says “The figures reveal that from the beginning of 1997 until August 2012 there was no discernible rise in aggregate global temperatures”.

        So I looked at the figures and taking account of the 95% confidence intervals provided in Hadcrut4, I can see no statistical argument against the assertion of “no discernable rise…….”.

        You can’t just draw a trend line through the data but you have to take account of inherent statistical errors in the measuring process.

        Please enlighten me what the statistical argument is that counters the basic assertion of the article.

      • Steven Mosher

        BBD,

        perhaps you misunderstand my argument.

        let’s start with your response

        “Trying to blame Mann and Jones and the rest for the Daily Mail? Nothing they could possibly have done justifies the existence of the Daily Mail.”

        1. I am not blaming Mann and Jones and the rest for the Daily mail.
        Blame implies some sort of moral judgement. I make no moral judgement.

        2. I am not discussing the “existence” of the newspaper or “justifying its existence. Nothing justifies the existence of anything. Justice and existence are two entirely different matters.

        Here is what I am doing. I am making a point. The point is this.
        If you accept the justification of hiding the decline under the terms under which it was defended, then you accept the following principle:

        “It’s not fraud if the data was shown properly in some other context”
        That argument was chief amongst the justifications of hiding the decline.
        Another central argument was that the publications ( the WMO piece for example ) were not that important.

        If you accept those arguments, then you have no grounds to criticize what the Daily news has done. I do not accept those arguments and I do not accept what Rose has done. To put in a way that you will not be able to misunderstand : I object to both. Both are misleading.

        If you want to take space to distance yourself from shoddy chartsmanship and state plainly and clearly that Hide the decline was not best practices I offer you this opportunity to do so. But if you want to accept the grounds under which it was defended then you have no standing to criticize the mislead crap that Rose puts out.

        BBD. It is logically possible to both accept AGW and to criticize the fact that hide the decline was not best practices. The fact that you dont avail yourself of this option will be telling.
        In my book some people have lost credibility because they continue to defend shoddy work while at the same time trying to attack shoddy work from skeptics. You either have standards, or you don’t.

      • Steven Mosher has a point.

        But there is another aspect IMO.

        The Daily Mail (like the once-proud NY Times) is just a newspaper – a “rag”.

        As the saying goes, “Don’t believe everything you read in the papers”.

        It’s known as “freedom of the press” (to tell you anything you’re gullible enough to believe).

        But when a scientist purposely fudges the data, that’s a more serious offense (not legally, morally or ethically, maybe – but scientifically).

        It’s BAD SCIENCE.

        My opinion.

        Max

      • In data was altered, you have a point. If it is simply a case of picking an arbitrary start and end point, then you don’t. Both sides of the discussion do it and both sides complain about the other doing it. Mosher has it right – if you are going to play that game, you can’t complain when the other side follows suit.

      • Yes, nothing justifies the Daily Mail. How dare it blurt out clear facts like this? As Jones would have preferred to say, Why should they show the data, when people will only see it doesn’t do much for the CAGW bandwagon ? Gives us the blinkered, agenda-driven Goebbels-style BBC anyday.

      • steve, I was being flippant. Perhaps you need to be UK resident to understand how fractally awful the DM is. This understanding illuminates the intended humour.

      • As for your endless banging on about Hide the Decline and ‘Climategate’ and ‘The Team’ – it is a counter-productive hyper-focus on irrelevancies. In case you don’t understand that, I mean that it is chum for the crypto-denialist crowd. Whether you are in fact of the CD faction is irrelevant to the fact that what you do fills their bowls. Reconsider it, why don’t you?

      • BBD, as for your “As for your endless banging on about Hide the Decline and ‘Climategate’ and ‘The Team’ – it is a counter-productive hyper-focus on irrelevancies” …

        … it is not irrelevant at all , it is fundamentally important. It tells the public about the reliability of those feeding us the ‘official’ ideas about the climate. In legal terms, climate science has been shown to be lying to the court, and as such is deemed an unreliable witness.

        And if you think it is harsh to condemn the whole profession for the acts of some of its leading lights – it isn’t, since very few of them have voiced any concern. Indeed this deafening silence of the many, is far more damning than the hiding of data etc etc, since it indicates that these acts of Mann and others to sabotage the science process were not the acts of some radicals on the edge, but were seen as normal practice not warranting comment.

        That is why the profession as a whole is simply untrustworthy, and why this needs to be constantly brought up until such time as the profession – and its apologists such as yourself – acts decisively against those like Mann and Jones have brought the profession into such disrepute.

      • And if you think it is harsh to condemn the whole profession for the acts of some of its leading lights – it isn’t, since very few of them have voiced any concern.

        I don’t think it’s ‘harsh’ I think it’s nonsensical, dishonest, unwarranted, stupid, dangerous, and above all, political.

        You are doing the classic fake sceptic fake outrage chicken squawk over things that only fake sceptics care about. The rest of the field gets on with science, leaving the chicken squawk to the fake sceptics.

      • You should study mike’s stanzas, BBD.

        You too can write with zest and gusto.

      • BBD

        I will make this simple for you since you are British and after 17 years of marriage to a Brit I understand all to well the importance of keeping things simple for you guys.

        You believe that Hide the decline was irrelevant. –watch very closely you twit– SO DO I.

        That’s right. Hide the decline was not relevant. That is WHY I can plainly say that the behavior was wrong and can plainly say that it wasnt best practices.

        So, if you agree that hide the decline was not relevant and not important then it should be easy for you to agree that the chartsmanship they engaged in was wrong, misleading, and not best practices.

        get it you twit.

        I agree with you that it wasnt important that is WHY I think we should say what is simply true. What they did was wrong. We should NOT encourage others to do the kinds of things they did. It was a mistake. A small one. Admit it and move on to do better in the future.

      • Dear BBD,

        We should say what is simply true
        Because it’s not important.

        If it were important,
        What should we say?

        Please pay attention and stop
        Arguing against the truth.

        Twit.

        Simples.

      • steven

        I see a man who cannot leave certain topics alone for long enough to claim plausibly that they do not matter. I see someone who doesn’t appreciate that he cannot have it both ways, while trying to make that exact same argument. In fact, I think I see a twit.

      • So what we essentially have is
        - leading lights in mainstream climate science engaging in outright science fraud – hiding data, covering their tracks etc – in order to sell alarmism
        - the climate science hoi-polloi saying nothing much about it, thereby making themselves complicit in the the fraud, and signalling their acceptance of fraud as a valid practice in science.

        Only “fake” skeptics condemn the hoi-polloi for their fraud-endorsing deafening silence, says BBD, who himself will not condemn it either, and who by implication is eager that the profession just be left to get on with more fraud. As long as it reaches an alarmist conclusion, of course.

      • Fake alarmists ( is there any other kind though ?) like Web and Willard can wriggle as much as they like. The fact is, Jones is near the very top of the climate science tree, has been heavily committed to science fraud in order to advance the alarmist political agenda, and even he agrees there has been this flattening.
        And yes, we all know it’s only 16 years.

      • Look, more running from the facts.

      • Naw, willard – it’s a waffly wabbit.

        Max

      • manacker,

        This waffly wabbit just told me you that you forgot to say if you knew the difference between a projection and a prediction.

        It also wonders if you got that quote from that Willard Romney book.

      • Look W, a straw squirrel

    • Good catch Web. I would hope for a correction. Still that does mean about 15 years or so. Start date problems are just that. Have to start somewhere and 15 years is 15 years. I think that stating no significant (.2C per decade) also needs to be stated correctly and consistantly.

    • Web

      You incorrectly judge the bottom line. A more accurate assessment of the actual bottom line is that warming has not been occuring as quickly as was feared, that the consequences of it getting warmer are not as dire as had been feared, and that in the real world, governments are not going implement actions that will prevent CO2 levels from continuing to rise for decades. The real bottom line is that mitigation actions generally make no sense and that adaptation is the only reasonable response.

      • > A more accurate assessment of the actual bottom line [...]

        If we can witness the actual bottom line, why assess it more accurately?

      • willard- did i state that we witnessed or observed the bottom line?

      • Rob Starkey,

        Talking about the “actual bottom line” like you do presumes you have a way to judge that your guestimate is better than WebHubTelescope’s. How can you tell, if you have no idea what the actual bottom line is?

        Simples.

        Worse still is your overall line of argument, which repeats the old Gorgian trick:

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/872135681

        In other words, your overall stance can well lead to the inconvenient fact that nothing exists.

        I’d rather stick to mundane reality than follow through your bottom lines.

  8. Permit me to build upon one of your quotes….

    Climate models are very complex. They are imperfect, incomplete, and written by human beings based upon simplified theories difficult to test, calibrated and initialized with noisy data. The building of the models is paid by human sponsors whose scientific objectivity is questionable and who like to see results. “Favorable” results correlates with funding of later phases of model development.

  9. A two-dimensional surface, which strictly speaking can’t hold any heat at all, is about the worst place to look for the energy imbalance created by GHGs. The best place, of course, is the ocean, whose heat capacity is 1000 times the atmosphere’s — and it continues to warm.

    • Aye, David. There is no evidence of any kind of reversion to the mean with the ocean heat content.

      Noise is a natural part of any reversion-to-the-mean process, especially where the potential energy well is shallow enough to allow for significant excursions and fluctuations. That’s what is happening with the atmosphere. What prevents these excursions is the integral filtering of a sink with huge thermal capacities, such as the ocean.

      Pretty sad that most of the climate skeptics have little appreciation for practical physics, not to mention any real understanding of.the underling principles.

      • actually, the reversion to mean is most evident in the OHC. The 0-300 ENSO region has been neutral to declining,
        http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o252/captdallas2/climate%20stuff/WabbitsFolly.png
        and 0-700 http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/3M_HEAT_CONTENT/ is indicating a turn.

        The 0-2000 is less certain, but that much thermal mass would not stop on a dime.

        The mean though for the instrumental was a slope of ~0.4C per century that started circa 1900 which is likely an even longer term internal response to multiple perturbations over the centuries leading up to 1900. The timing of the modern era peak is in the range of the Bond event recurrences.

        Since you are so confident that CO2 is “the” perturbation, when would you post a graph of your “skepticism”?

        http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/bibliography/related_files/jrt9502.pdf

        That is a pretty good paper on that Fickiian diffusion thingy.

      • Really Captn, this bit from you:

        “and 0-700 http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/OC5/3M_HEAT_CONTENT/ is indicating a turn.”

        ____
        And you based this “indicating a turn” on what? There is no “turn” indicated.

      • Gates, the ARGO data is the less steep part of the curve near the end. The turn is relative to the “mean” slope from 1900 which is not zero. Earth does have century and longer oscillations because it takes centuries and longer for heat to transfer in the ocean.

        BTW,since the ocean heat content data is a touch spotty on the century and longer scales, you can use SST to estimate the changes in OHC uptake. Since most of the factors that influence the rate of OHC are in the southern hemisphere with most of the ocean to uptake heat, that would be a good place to start looking :)

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Captn said:

        “BTW,since the ocean heat content data is a touch spotty on the century and longer scales, you can use SST to estimate the changes in OHC uptake. ”
        ______

        You absolutely cannot use SST’s to estimate changes in OHC uptake. Some times they move in opposite direction and sometimes they move together. SST’s are often a better metric for how much heat is leaving the ocean, for example, during some El Nino episodes. So in this case they’d be negatively correlated. On the flip side, OHC often increases, especially in areas like the the Pacific Warm Pool during La Nina episodes, so even though SST’s are cooler in the eastern Pacific, they may be warmer in the Western. Which region are you going to try to associate with OHC. In short, you can’t use SST’s as a consistent proxy to estimate changes in OHC.

      • Capn

        R. Gates says:

        You absolutely cannot use SST’s to estimate changes in OHC uptake. Some times they move in opposite direction and sometimes they move together. SST’s are often a better metric for how much heat is leaving the ocean, for example, during some El Nino episodes.

        Now I’ve recently said *exactly* the same thing to you – almost word for word. You do have a terrible habit of simply ignoring things that are inconvenient to your rats’ nest of hypotheses. You need to fix that.

      • BBD, you where wrong then and you are wrong now. SST is not an exact estimate of OHC uptake, but with proper allowances for lag times, does provide a reasonable estimate of changes in OHC uptake.

        http://redneckphysics.blogspot.com/2012/10/how-would-you-predict-future.html

        You won’t read that of course, but the relative changes in the SST in 44-64S lead climate by ~30 years. The general slope of the change, removing the ~30 oscillation, is proportional to the rate of ocean heat uptake.

        http://berkeleyearth.lbl.gov/auto/Regional/TMIN/Figures/new-zealand-TMIN-Trend.pdf

        Even the Tmin from surface stations located close to the Antarctic Convergence provides clues to climate oscillations.

        You really should expand you reading list, Tuggweilder, Lawrence, Stott …

      • Captn

        You really should expand you reading list

        I wouldn’t have said this, given the horrible embarrassment you suffered because you didn’t read Martin et al. And Stott is wrong, as Shakun et al. (2012) neatly demonstrates. And as I have already pointed out. You really need to fix this *ignoring stuff* problem or you will be taken for a crank and a bore.

      • lol “I wouldn’t have said this, given the horrible embarrassment you suffered ” You mean my promotion? Time will tell BBD.

      • Captn

        In your case, time has told. You blew it.

      • The last time I checked, the 1st law of Thermodynamics requires the conservation of energy, not the conservation of heat. My understanding of physics goes at least as far as that.

        Oh, and every now and again somebody remembers to mention the concept of work [in the thermodynamic sense, not the models which don't work].

      • Web,

        Guess we can’t all be as learned or smart as you.

        Fortunately most of us also can’t be as nasty and uncivil as you either.

        Must be lonely at the top.

      • You give what you get, oh learned one.

    • @David Appel “The best place, of course, is the ocean, whose heat capacity is 1000 times the atmosphere’s — and it continues to warm.”

      What data can we use to track global ocean temperatures at say on the surface, medium depth (3 metres say), 10 metres and below 10 metres?

      Citations?

      • “What data can we use to track global ocean temperatures at say on the surface, medium depth (3 metres say), 10 metres and below 10 metres? “

        Easy to do this, check how I did the data exploration using the NOAA TAO site :
        http://theoilconundrum.blogspot.com/2011/10/sea-temperature-correlation.html

        Would you like to volunteer and continue on with my analysis?

        Or are you one of the skeptics that depends on Bob Tisdale to do everything for you? :) :)

      • Not yes, and not no.
        ===========

      • I had a look at your work on sea temps WHT and can see that you are prepared to put in the work, well done. It is also obvious that your mind works in a similar way to mine since you have already thought of some of the questions that I have about ocean heat build-up and the rate of exchange between different levels.

        This is the second time that you have invited me to do some research of my own and contribute something more to the debate, but I am concerned about my shortcomings in the physics and in handling dissenting views that invariably gets aimed at the tall poppies such as yourself and Chief.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        kim: Not yes, and not no.

        I second that.

    • A two-dimensional surface, which strictly speaking can’t hold any heat at all, is about the worst place to look for the energy imbalance created by GHGs

      Unless you are looking at an increase in temperature, say 1975 – 2000, and you want to demonstrate AGW, in which case your two dimensional surface is pretty much OK for IPCC et al, the media, and so on.

  10. The bottom line is that Argo data shows that the oceans have not been acumulating heat. In fact, a negative bias is very pronounced since 2003.
    The surface temp record from Hadcrut4 shows a very level trend since 1997.

    The bare facts of all of this are that the earth has not warmed statistically, nor has it cooled statistically. It has been esentially flat for the past 16 years.

    One more year of sub normal surface temps will make 17 years and meet the criteria of Dr. Santor’s 17 year period.

    • Camburn | October 14, 2012 at 11:19 pm | said:

      “The bottom line is that Argo data shows that the oceans have not been acumulating (sp) heat. In fact, a negative bias is very pronounced since 2003.”
      _____

      Have you been drinking the Bob Tisdale cool-aid? This is the broadest measure we currently have of energy accumulation in Earth’s energy system:

      http://i49.tinypic.com/riuhaa.jpg

      Don’t see much cooling here. Or perhaps we should focus on Bob’s hand-picked (i.e. cherry picked) artificially divided up regional approach to look at GLOBAL ocean heat content.

      Earth continues to accumulate energy, and will do so as long as greenhouse gases continue to accumulate.

      • R. Gates:
        No, I look at the ARGO data. The trend is flat to down.

        Nice pic that you posted, but until I can read the paper and see the methodology, all you have is a pic. And that pic, at this time, is not worth a 1,000 words.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Camburn,

        The last part of that graph was the ARGO data. With a high degree of confidence we can say that the global ocean down to 2000 meters has definitely NOT cooled in the past 10 years, but saw the warmest 10 years on instrument record.

        But if you enjoy it, then continue to drink the Tisdale cool-aid.

      • R. Gates:

        If you insist in “the warmest 10 years” theme, the only thing you show is you are cheating. Warmest ten years does not mean warming ten years. They may be the warmest, and be warming … or cooling.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Plazaeme,

        And they may be the warmest 10 years and not really be warming or cooling, but just staying level near record levels– which is the case. 2011 was the warmest La Niña year on record. So even within natural variation that would tend to bring temperatures down, we are seeing the warmth persist.

      • R. Gates

        The “warmest 10 years” argument is a red herring.

        OBVIOUSLY if it warmed at a higher rate toward the end of the last century (+0.16C/decade) than the rate of cooling since the century changed (-0.06C/decade), the last 10 years will be warmer than the prior 10 years (even if the current trend is cooling).

        Plain old fourth grade arithmetic.

        Max

      • R. Gates

        ARGO has told us (Willis, Loehle) that the ocean has NOT accumulated heat since ARGO was installed (2003). Willis called it a “speed bump”.

        Before that, we had spotty measurements by expendable XBT devices, which were known (Willis) to introduce a “warming bias”.

        Before XBT, the measurements were even more spotty, and can most likely be discarded..

        So we REALLY only have a meaningful record of ocean heat content since 2003, and it does not show an increase.

        Now I will admit that it is logical to assume that during the late-20th century period of atmospheric warming, it is likely that the ocean also warmed a bit (even if it wasn’t accurately measured)

        But I would not try to use “increasing ocean heat content” as evidence for global GH warming.

        Max

      • This the second time you have misrepresented the “speed bump”. What you are saying is just plain rubbish. Willis published a paper that showed the oceans were cooling. When he thought the oceans were cooling, he called it a “speed bump”.

        His data was at odds with Takmeng Wong’s data. Wong started hinting his data was right and that there was a problem with ARGO. Then Willis found the problem with ARGO.

        The speed bump was erased. It was never there. There was no speed bump.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates) says: “The last part of that graph was the ARGO data.”

        Wrong. The last part of the graph you linked includes ARGO data. It is not solely ARGO data. Also, it has been adjusted by the NODC. Raw ARGO data is better represented by the UKMO EN3 data in these graphs:
        http://bobtisdale.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/figure-2.png
        And
        http://bobtisdale.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/figure-3.png
        They’re from this post:
        http://bobtisdale.wordpress.com/2012/06/02/ukmo-en3-ocean-heat-content-anomaly-data-disappeared-from-the-knmi-climate-explorer-as-suddenly-as-it-appeared/

        Also, A fan of *MORE* discourse’s and your personal attacks on this thread are quite humorous. They included: “Have you been drinking the Bob Tisdale cool-aid?” and “Bob Tisdale’s recent analyses exemplify denialist cognition; James Hansen’s recent analyses exemplify scientific cognition.”

        You both have no grasp of the subject matter—you make that obvious to all those reading this thread. Your beliefs have blinded you to the point that you’ve become funny—in a laughing-at-you, not with you, way. You should be embarrassed with and by yourselves. I’m embarrassed for you.

        Adios.

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        Bob Tisdale, as was posted previously:

        Science and engineering (S&E) nowadays rests upon  THREE  FOUR mutually-supporting pillars:

        •  physical theory, and
        •  computational simulation, and
        •  experimental test, and
        •  observation of nature.

        In practice, the S&E community arrives at consensus when all four pillars strongly support the same conclusion. In particular, the reality of AGW is strongly supported by all four pillars … hence the modern consensus that “AGW is real.

        Historically the pillar that came first, and that is regarded as the strongest pillar of modern science, is the thermodynamic pillar that is at the core of (for example) James Hansen’s climate-change worldview.

        An important advance of 2012, has been the extent to which the computational, experimental, and observational pillars, all are supporting the fundamental thermodynamical pillar.

        Conclusion  Sufficient thermodynamical, comptuational, experimental, and observational evidence now exists, for rational skeptics to confidently infer “James Hansen’s worldview of climate-change science is substantially correct.”

        Thank you for helping to clarify this point, Bob Tisdale!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • Fan

        Looks to me like you need to check with Bob Tisdale if you understood what he wrote (it appears to me that you didn’t).

        Max

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse: Thank you for confirming that you are in fact a parrot; that is, you can offer nothing to this discussion other than links.

        Do me a favor. When you and R. Gates want to downplay my work, link to the post about my book:
        http://bobtisdale.wordpress.com/2012/09/03/everything-you-every-wanted-to-know-about-el-nino-and-la-nina-2/
        Or you could link directly to the download/sales site:
        http://transactions.digitaldeliveryapp.com/products/6574/purchase

        Since no one believes anything you two write, the ways you jabber on and on with all of those negative things you say about me will suggest to people that they should buy my book.

      • lurker, passing through laughing

        Bob,
        Taking the believer fanatics seriously is an error.
        they are clowns with little more than self-parody and echoing of climate fanatic talking points.
        Gates was a wee bit better in the past, but has devolved lately. Fan was always a neverwuzzer.
        Keep with your good work.
        The more the trolls whine and howl, the more you can know yuo are on the mark.

      • Bob T.,

        You cherry-pick a select set of regions of the planet’s oceans for measuring ocean heat content, measure only down to your prescribed depth (because you know much further gives you results you don’t like), don’t actually measure heat content but “anomalies” to heat content, offer a flimsy excuse as to why measuring the whole ocean’s heat content means we are “assuming” CO2 global warming, and then ask for people to prove why your cherry-picking is incorrect. You are a hoot Bob! But a dangerous hoot, as I fear your extremely skewed and cherry-picked view of things will cause many to be confused about the nature of internal variability, and the role that external forcings play in Earth’s climate system. I hope that at least some can see through the cherry-picked and skewed view of things that you present and get back to some fundamental physics whereby we measure heat content of the whole ocean by… actually measuring the heat content of the whole ocean, rather than heat content anomalies form Bob Tisdale’s Cherry-Picked regions.

      • R Gates …………offer a flimsy excuse as to why measuring the whole ocean’s heat content means we are “assuming” CO2 global warming

        That bit does rather nail you in particular Mr Gates.

  11. A fan of *MORE* discourse

    The Daily Mail article helped me to an appreciation that:

    •  The denialist climate-change worldview is short-term and local … to denialists the world’s climate is governed by local dynamics that is so chaotic that nothing can be predicted.

    •  The scientific climate-change worldview is long-term and global … to scientists the world’s climate is governed by global conservation laws that are broadly understandable and predictable.

    Example Bob Tisdale’s recent analyses exemplify denialist cognition; James Hansen’s recent analyses exemplify scientific cognition.

    Judith Curry’s climate-change worldview (AFAICT) is intermediate between these two exemplars!

      :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

    • Latimer Alder

      @AFOTBS

      Let me translate that for you

      Realists look at what real measurements tell us about actually happens in the world. This used to be called ‘the scientific method’

      Alarmists look at what their untested and unverified models tell them about what might happen in 100 years or more. This used to be called ‘astrology’

      There. Fixed it for you.

      • Tisdale’s book is observation based star studded true action analysis, you know, real measurements, and science and stuff. Just the Max, Ms. Facts.
        =======================

    • :( :) :) ;) ;) ((:

    • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

      A fan of *MORE* discourse: The scientific climate-change worldview is long-term and global … to scientists the world’s climate is governed by global conservation laws that are broadly understandable and predictable.

      The warmist view is based on modeling of the Earth as flat; with a homogeneous surface; uniformly illuminated at its average value; that lacks cloud formation and rainfall; and has no non-radiative heat transfer; and is based on an imaginary “equilibrium”. I refer to this jocularly as the “flat Earth” model. The dynamic models with a rotating spherical Earth; convective heat transport; emerging and dissipating clouds over oceans, mountains, plains, and forests; and with latent heat exchanges is pretty agnostic about the future, with predictions all over the place and with demonstrated disagreements and inaccuracies in every location. The whole thing was hyped up based on a short run of apparent warming after some decades of cooling.

  12. Here’s the history of the sixty-four year journey to Climategate:

    http://omanuel.wordpress.com/about/#comment-1369

    - Oliver K. Manuel
    “Oh what a tangled web we weave, . . .”
    For later coincidence to concede !

  13. http://judithcurry.com/2012/10/13/week-in-review-101312/#comment-253906

    There are special problems with statements about trends at the endpoints of any graph. When this span of 17 years isn’t an endpoint, we’ll have a much better picture of its significance..

    It’d be nice if we had nearly so much data collection on physical measures fit to the purpose of climatology as we do of data collection on public opinion.

    We don’t have it, and it’s likely never to reduce the lag between when we make the observation and when we have the context to understand it in terms of climate to below thirteen years or so, in any event.

    Come back in seventeen years, and we’ll discuss the significance of the current pause.

    • True, but unfortunately this agrees with Tebaldi and Knutti that we may need to wait 130 years or longer to see if a 100 year prediction was correct. This consideration becomes important as one reads what was said in AR4 and the conversation below between Mosher and Joshua. My position is that the over certainty that is appearring after it seemed much to obvious at the time of formulation of the work that went into AR4, people should take science to mind and not to heart. There has been too much vested interest, in a personal sense, and this has led to excess claims of the unsupportable. There will always be such excesses with humans. But the unfortuante conflagation of policy and science and the excessive claims of certainty have warped and poisoned a lot of conversation.

      • johnfpittman | October 15, 2012 at 1:31 pm |

        I could read the papers of Tebaldi, Knutti, Oreskes et al sixteen hours a day for a month, and every hour revise completely all my knowledge and views and perspectives about statistics and the interpretation of data. They’re real professionals; I do not say this to argue for endorsing every conclusion or view they express.. indeed, I think that would be more useless to them than it would be useless to me, and it’s pretty useless to me.

        I say this because the first four minutes of http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGh64Xo4axc&feature=g-logo-xit reminds me that there are steps in interpretation of data, and if you’re just winging it off the top of your head, or trying it without sufficient preparation and exercise and drill, you will go *SPLAT* at some point.

        We can tell from the datasets, not just GMT, or sixteen 70-year models, but also Arctic extent and volume, and aerosol count and sea level and Argo and GRACE, and extreme event frequency and migration of animals and plants and ocean pH and ice core and last time I tried to count it over a thousand distinct measures across the sciences that conform to the GHE proposition, and the hard logic of the ab initio proposition itself.

        http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:900/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:720/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:180/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:900/mean:71/mean:73/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1937.67/to:1997.67/trend/plot/hadcrut3sh/from:1937.67/to:1952.67/trend

        For example, if we look at the Daily Mail kerfuffle over their rapidly hamfisted interpretation of HadCRUT4, we see they skipped about 90% of the steps (though some of the steps they took, they actually got right, despite some of the criticisms we’ve heard here). Even Mr. Girma Orssengo’s techniques lend us useful interpretive measures to apply to the DM ‘flat’ trend.

        #Time series (hadcrut4) from 1850 to 2012.67
        #Selected last 180 samples
        #Least squares trend line; slope = 0.003296 per year
        1997.67 0.424851
        2012.67 0.474291
        #Data ends
        #Number of samples: 2
        #Mean: 0.449571

        #Time series (hadcrut3) from 1850 to 2012.67
        #Selected data from 1937.67
        #Selected data up to 1952.67
        #Least squares trend line; slope = -0.0228886 per year
        1937.75 0.01545
        1952.75 -0.32788
        #Data ends
        #Number of samples: 2
        #Mean: -0.156215

        DM did get right starting and ending their sample in the same month; the globe is asymmetric N/S, so while seasons ought not matter it’s easy to see if we test that there’s a bias. They got right their claim of ‘no rise’ (in effect) on 15 years, but only very misleadingly in a sense that qualifies to my mind as intentional deception or incompetence. 0.033C/decade is, on 180 samples, slightly below the confidence level we’d need to distinguish from zero rise. And 0.47C does technically round to 0.5C, given the significant digits we can apply, given the data.

        What they got wrong, from two views.

        Since we’ve invoked Mr. Orssengo, let’s use his techniques to invalidate DM first:
        1. As Mr. Orssengo will tell you, there’s an apparent 60-year cycle.
        2. While we don’t have to accept his hypothesis of a 60-year cycle, we can use the same methods to determine that parallel tangents on HadCRUT4 are about 60 years apart, so comparisons 720 months separated are more valid than shorter trend lines in some sense.
        3. Comparing the 1937-1952 trend to the 1997-2012 trend (at 0.67 of the way through the year), we see that the ‘flat’ trend of the current period has three distinct qualities:
        a. it reverses the sign of the most reasonable comparison period,
        b. it is far hotter (0.6C+ in just 6 decades), and
        c. it is relatively rising far faster.
        4.These three qualities we’re sure of to above 97.5% confidence, an astounding improvement over the approximately 85% confidence of the DM’s ‘flat’ trend claim, thoroughly dismantling the DM’s assertion of a pause.
        5. Relative to what the trend suggests we ought expect, not only is this an extremely rapidly rising period, but it’s hotter than the IPCC suggests ought happen.

        Second, let’s look at BEST:

        http://berkeleyearth.org/pdf/annual-with-forcing.pdf

        Taking into account aerosols — and it’s a travesty we have such poor collection of aerosol data (in fact, I believe it’s about 80% of _the_ travesty alluded to by Trenberth) — from the evidence we do have, we can see the right headline the DM article should have had, if the DM valued truth in journalism, would be “CHINESE SOOT HIDES CINO-US CO2 WARMING”.

        So, yes. Come back in 17 years to discuss the ‘pause’ you think we’re in, and we’ll laugh that people were ever so foolish as to even think in terms of pause at all.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Bart R.,

        You given some excellent reasons for your position on the issue of Anthropogenic climate change, and I agree in principle with many of them. You do realize of course that no one’s mind was ever changed by a blog post. But occasionally you’ll get a true skeptic (in the broad sense of the word) who might be persuaded to at least step away from the blogs and do some actual scientific reading themselves and remain open minded to the issue. After a year or so of this, most will come to the conclusions that you have outlined, and which the majority of the experts in the field have come to. Humans are altering the planet in multiple ways with the Anthropocene in full swing and having been so for quite some time. This party is really just getting started…

    • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

      Bart R: Come back in seventeen years, and we’ll discuss the significance of the current pause.

      This is very similar to my repeated assertion that the whole picture will be much clearer after the next 20 years of persistent research.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler | October 15, 2012 at 2:41 pm |

        Except that — if I understand you correctly — you argue to drop everything but research, (apparently preferrably fingoist research into alternate hypotheses more to your liking) and do nothing useful for 20 years.

        Me, I prefer to do as Newton argued, accept the proposition that has been proven as accurate or very nearly true, use prudent policy to act guided by this science and logic, and regard any other hypotheses as pointless until new data overturns the accepted proposition.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        everything but research, (apparently preferrably fingoist research into alternate hypotheses more to your liking) and do nothing useful for 20 years.

        What I advocate from time to time is R&D on all energy supplies to drive down their costs; and construction of much better and more extensive irrigation/flood control works. Not everything is possible all at once, but those are almost “no regrets” strategies that will pay off whether increasing CO2 causes increased temperatures or not.

        accept the proposition that has been proven as accurate or very nearly true

        In climate science there isn’t one of those.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler | October 16, 2012 at 12:19 am |

        I might have agreed with you about hydrology research, but of late I’m soured on the whole topic. Then again, that seems a silly bias to harbor.

        And the GHE propostion is unarguably accurate or very nearly true, without observations that require much refinement or extenction or revision of the original rationale.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        Bart R: I might have agreed with you about hydrology research, but of late I’m soured on the whole topic.

        What do you support? You presumed to know that my advocacy was bad, so I gave a short outline; what do you advocate?

        And the GHE propostion is unarguably accurate or very nearly true,

        What’s not known is what increased CO2 will do to the many energy transport processes in the atmosphere and what their net effects will be, starting from where we are now. Increased CO2 might increase the rate on non-radiative transfer of heat from the lower troposphere to the upper troposphere, and the rate of radiative transfer to space; it might increase cloud cover; it might increase the rate of transfer of heat from the tropics to the poles and the net rate of cooling of all extra-polar atmosphere; these and many more can not be ruled out on present evidence, and there are no accurate simulations of recent CO2 effects in climate change. No one predicted that the highest CO2 concentrations in recorded history would produce 15 years of nearly no warming; only post-hoc adjustments, not stringently tested, account for that. The modelsl are arguably wrong, and not accurate.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler | October 16, 2012 at 1:03 pm |

        What do you support? You presumed to know that my advocacy was bad, so I gave a short outline; what do you advocate?

        I advocate privatization of the Carbon Cycle with the price set by the Law of Sypply and Demand.

        Since every country in the world is a sovereign nation governed by laws that are none of my business, I’m all for each of them deciding what that means in their own local case.

        My own ideal version uses the income tax system to deliver dividends to everyone with a job every paycheck, and the retail tax system to collect fees from every carbon sale based on CO2E, the level of the fee set by the amount that maximizes dividends, and the government taking nothing out of this process. By reducing tax churn, the government saves more than enough to support the marginal cost of added administration.

        In this system, if no one wants to use less carbon, that’s great. They have all the money from dividends to continue paying the fair Market price for the Carbon Cycle they use. But if they choose, realizing the fair price is so high to make other democratic choices at time of purchase, that’s their free Market right.

        This simple measure ends the current confiscation of scarce resources without compensation by Free Riders.

        If, after the Carbon Cycle is priced, nations find they want to do more, then let them. Who am I to tell nations what to do? Who am I to say what subsidies to give whom (though in general, I’d prefer fewer or no subsidies, where it can be arranged)? Who am I to determine what Science ought be done?

        I just want my money.

        What’s not known is what increased CO2 will do to the many energy transport processes in the atmosphere and what their net effects will be, starting from where we are now.

        Increased CO2 might increase the rate on non-radiative transfer of heat from the lower troposphere to the upper troposphere, and the rate of radiative transfer to space;

        Fingoism. Lacks parsimony. Lacks simplicity. Lacks universality. Fails on estimation checking.

        it might increase cloud cover;

        Fingoism. Fails on estimation checking. The best indications we have are indecisive, so we treat the GHE proposition as accurate or very nearly true until sufficient data is collected to revise or enhance our knowledge.

        it might increase the rate of transfer of heat from the tropics to the poles and the net rate of cooling of all extra-polar atmosphere;

        Fingoism. Fails on conservation of heat budget. The best indications we have are indecisive, so we treat the GHE proposition as accurate or very nearly true until sufficient data is collected to revise or enhance our knowledge.

        these and many more can not be ruled out on present evidence, and there are no accurate simulations of recent CO2 effects in climate change.

        You make the classic fingoist argument for paralysis by analysis through feigning endless hypotheses. Which means we can use the classic scientific response of just dismissing you until such time as new observations warrant revising the current proposition.

        No one predicted that the highest CO2 concentrations in recorded history would produce 15 years of nearly no warming; only post-hoc adjustments, not stringently tested, account for that.

        To characterize the warmest fifteen year period in history, doubling of the relative frequency of warmer years relative to cooler years, the longest unbroken period in the modern record without a significant cold snap, the meltdown of the Arctic Sea Ice as ‘nearly no warming’ is so wrong as to beggar description.

        By every measure except peak annual temperature rise compared to the prior span for each span of five years in the past six decades has left all old records behind — including the warming trend between the first and second world wars — and just two of those five year spans failed in that measure, with only one of the most recent three spans of five years breaking that trend.

        Aerosols are a poorly-measured, but well-understood phenomenon. Or do you really think no one ever noticed before that soot and ash in the atmosphere has a cooling influence?

        What you seem to be trying to say is that the IPCC — in the report that they put out warning that they would not be able to account for many variables — failed to account for some variables. That’s the nature of the beast. Things you can’t anticipate, you adjust post hoc.

        Does that weaken the IPCC case? Compared to what standard do you mean weaken? Weaker than it was in the first place, where they had all those caveats?

        The modelsl are arguably wrong, and not accurate.

        All models are wrong. Some are merely useful. In the case of the much-contested projections, it would be incredible if they turned out to be accurate. So many arbitrary guesses (immaterial to the fitness to purpose of the models) would have to have been bang-on right about so many unknowns and unknowables that it boggles the mind.

        What are the models fit for? They’re fit to show that a world without a GHE does not adequately explain GMT. They’re fit to show that the variability of the climate we see now can only be explained by AGW. They’re fit to anticipate ‘pauses’ (what an inarticulate and clumsy term) like we might be able to confirm about the present day in eight years, because there were 23 such pauses in the projections used for the IPCC ensemble. They’re extremely fit to show that even with all the advantages of having carefully built cases, some people will still say incredibly stupid things like various people in the IPCC said.

        What aren’t they fit for? Temperature prediction, they’re utterly incapable of doing.

      • thisisnotgoodtogo

        Bart, are you saying that you just want your share of the money paid for despoiling the future of Hansen’s grandchildren ?

        Isn’t that just taking a personal profit from the intergenerational crimes being committed ?

      • Yes, in effect Bart does indeed just want to be paid for the damage done to the environment. He probably thinks this will reduce such pollution, but hasn’t factored in that the people doing the pollution are the same people as the ones that will be paid, so the net result on both pollution and wealth distribution will be about zero.

      • Along Georgist lines, Bart proposes to nationalize the natural resource of carbon (confusingly calling the nationalization “privatization”, and carbon the “carbon cycle”). And then distribute the takings to the public, in keeping with Henry George’s intentions of benefiting the public with the rent from natural resources.

        Heck why not nationalize air too – that’s also a natural resource – charge all users of it, and pay them the takings? That’ll get rid of all those free riders.

      • Memphis | October 17, 2012 at 1:22 am |

        You know, if you want to propose something, just propose it. Don’t slap it all over what I actually said and pretend what you want is what I meant.

        You know as well as I do that you can’t nationalize a Commons; it’s already nationalized. At worse, if what you allege falsely were true, it would be a conversion from a nationalized system that pays into the pockets of a few fossil industry owners to a nationalized system that pays into the pockets of everyone equally. How is that not better than what we now have.

        At best, what I say I intend, what the common definition of the words I use mean, what Economics demonstrates, what Capitalism ensures, is that privatizing the carbon cycle is due, right, proper, and a necessary duty of government.

        As would be the case for any resource treated as commons that exhibits scarcity, rivalrous use, and administratively practical excludability.

        The carbon cycle exhibits these qualities. It’s past time for government to do its job.

        And for you to stop trying to put words into other people’s mouths.

      • Seems Bart doesn’t take too kindly to his “ideas” being examined for what they actually are. And won’t explain why nationalizing carbon (not the ca carbon “cycle”) is good, but nationalizing air is not.

      • Chief Hydrologist

        It is nor really a resource rent tax either. The intention is to do away with the energy source entirely – with a tax of about $300/tonne.

        ‘The policy objective is to cause a substitution from low-cost but dirty energy production to higher-cost but cleaner energy production. In plain language the policy objective should lead to a permanent increase in household prices and fewer carbon emissions. But if successful, the revenue will decline, meaning there will be no money to pay compensation. There just isn’t enough money to finance this scheme.

        The government is planning to allocate revenue from a windfall gain to permanent spending. This is a recipe for structural deficits and fiscal irresponsibility. In the short run this policy isn’t revenue neutral and in the long run it isn’t budget neutral either.’

        http://www.ipa.org.au/news/2332/carbon-illusion-we-can%27t-afford/pg/4

        A bizarre argument that he repeats ad nauseum with the same elements and psuedo sources – Newton for God’s sake. Much like fan but without the emoticons. Got to be a psychopathology – it meets Einsteins definition of insanity. I didn’t how to spell psychopathology until I started blogging here. I don’t think this is progress.

      • Memphis | October 21, 2012 at 3:24 am |

        You still seem to be having a problem with definitions.

        http://lmgtfy.com/?q=nationalization+privatization

      • Bart is the one who wants to mislabel the taxing/nationalizing of carbon fuel “privatization”. If you really want privatization, issue tradeable shares,

      • Memphis | October 23, 2012 at 12:48 am |

        Buy tradeable shares with the cash from your carbon cycle dividend, if you like. It’s your cash money to spend how you will.

      • How can I buy tradeable shares in air (or pollution rights thereto, which is I suppose the idea you are grasping for in your impenetrable and bizarre “carbon cycle” terminology), if there aren’t any ? And there won’t be any in your recommended scheme of taxing instead.

  14. Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also admitted that the climate models were imperfect…:

    I love this: He “admitted” that climate models were “imperfect.”

    You know, because previously he had tried to argue that they were “perfect,” right?

    Another day, other fraudulent portrayal in the climate debate. Some ol’ Same ol’.

    • Steven Mosher

      in the context of the many years of people arguing that we “know things” because of climate models, “admission” is probably one of the defensible words you could use.

      What other suggestions do you have

      Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also agreed that the climate models were imperfect…:

      Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also accepts that the climate models were imperfect…:

      Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also argues that the climate models were imperfect…:

      Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones also asserted that the climate models were imperfect…:

      My speculation is nobody could write anything that you would not be able to take in an uncharitable fashion. because, of course, you have an unstated bias.

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        Well said.

      • steven -

        My speculation is nobody could write anything that you would not be able to take in an uncharitable fashion.

        Once again, you are wrong.

        My speculation is nobody could write anything that you would not be able to take in an uncharitable fashion. because, of course, you have an unstated bias.

        I will assume that the following statement would not only be true (and not uncharitable), but also more useful, and informative:

        Like Prof Curry, Prof Jones has never stated that climate models were perfect – although he has differed with her about the degree to which they account for natural variability.

        Now I don’t know what Jones has or hasn’t said well-enough to know if the following statement would be true; but it should be true, and if it is true, then this is what should have been said:

        Like Prof. Curry, Prof. Jones has always argued that climate models are not perfect; however, he differs with Prof. Curry over the degree to which they appropriately account for natural variability.

      • Joshua

        How would you describe how these models have performed when compared to observed conditions? Wouldn’t your statement mislead less informed readers into believing there is great debate regarding the models actual performance?

      • And btw, steven,

        I was wondering whether you yet “admitted” that models aren’t perfect.

  15. Hi David, Good to see you recognize the use of surface temperture (often poorly measured) is not appropriate in looking for energy imbalances. What do you make of the lack of increase in ocean joules over the past decade or so (see http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=3446 and http://www.pas.rochester.edu/…/PLA_21192_proofs_plusFigs1_2.pdf )? If you ask John Cook he’ll tell you the heat is hiding in the 700-2000 meter depths of the ocean. Do you agree?

  16. Photographs, Tsk! I have seen yew on video, Judith,
    and yew looked bewtifull!

  17. They gave you the sad face because you are perceived the negative pessimist, delivering the bad news that we aren’t all going to die of global warming. Oh wait…

    In other news, I think this is the coal plant in the other picture – love google sleuthing!
    https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&safe=off&q=Selby+uk&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Selby,+North+Yorkshire,+United+Kingdom&ll=53.740049,-0.9946&spn=0.00882,0.026994&t=f&z=16&vpsrc=6&ecpose=53.72934044,-0.99997059,409.95,16.523,72.014,0

    • In 1965, I was working at the Central Electricity Generating Board. A report reached my desk saying that wind-tunnel tests of models showed that Selby B’s cooling towers would withstand 200 mph (320 kph) winds. That night, three of the towers collapsed in much lighter winds, perhaps 90 mph. Three deaths. Turns out that a single tower model was tested, the effects of having an array of eight close-together towers (2 x 4 bank) had not been considered. Model specification v reality, anyone?

      Favouring public information and having been a journalist, I wondered about advising the media of the report. I didn’t, but could concoct a good conspiracy theory, as when I was on motor-bike a few weeks later, a car was driven straight across a main road into me, injuries were expected by the medics to be fatal. (I knew they were wrong; my internal data was better than their external observations; more parallels?)

      (No, totally unconnected, but, hey, it’s a good story for the consp theorists.)

      • Faustino,

        You should have jumped – like Steve McQueen!

      • Peter, on my 70th birthday in June, I received a card with a Lego reconstruction of McQueen going over the wire, 47 years too late for me to take the advice.

      • Faustino,

        I was wondering if the accident had anything to do with your later period of ill-health (I think you said it occurred from about 2000)? No need to answer unless you want to.

      • Peter @ 2.56, no, I’m still affected by my 1965 injuries and subsequent botched leg surgery, but the 2000-09 illness was unrelated. I just get lots of opportunities to develop equanimity. :-)

      • Faustino,

        Here’s a more recent example of how models don’t always do a good job of reflecting the real world.

        The San Onofre Nuclear Station is off line do to problems with excessive vibration and tube failure in their new steam generators. The root cause of the problem appears to be flow models used by Mitsubishi in designing the SG’s. Behavior of flow in steam generator tubes is far less complicated and better understood than climate, yet the models still proved to be wrong.

    • Regarding that power plant photo, I find it pretty sad so many people can’t tell water vapor from smoke and a cooling tower from a smokestack.

  18. In the context of ocean heat content down to 2000 m, there is no pause since 1998
    http://www.skepticalscience.com/pics/Levitus2012OHC.jpg
    There is no pause in sea-level rise since 1998
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trends_in_global_average_absolute_sea_level,_1870-2008_(US_EPA).png
    Also for land temperatures there is no pause (see any of them), and do we need to be reminded of the Arctic sea-ice volume decline accelerating (I will spare you the PIOMAS plot).
    These indicate that the “pause” is confined to surface ocean layers, and that it is not sustainable.

    • Broken link. Try this for sea-level rise.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Current_sea_level_rise

    • Jim,

      The fake-skeptics and politically motivated seem to love to latch on to anything. If you want to measure the warming of a planet…wouldn’t you measure its biggest heat sink as broadly as you could? Of course you would (or at least, an honest person would). If you did want to get a pretty good snap shot of energy accumulation in the Earth system over the past 50 years, it would look like this:

      http://i49.tinypic.com/riuhaa.jpg

      Nothing like Bob Tisdale’s cherry-picked graphs.

      • Yes, unforced natural variations have, by their definition, no effect on integrated quantities such as the total energy in the system.

      • This is obviously true, yet Bob T. and Chief Hydrologist seem to think that magical energy is added to the system or created by internal natural variations.

      • Bob Tisdale must be over the target from all the flak he’s drawing. Buy and read his book before it sells out.
        =================

      • Bob Tisdale must be over the target from all the flak he’s drawing.

        Ladies and gentlemen – I give you the logic of a “skeptic.”

        Let’s extend the logic, shall we? Michael Mann gets a lot of flak. He must be over the target.

        Al Gore gets a lot of flak. He must be over the target.

        Joe Romm gets a lot of flak. He must be over the target.

        Shall I go on?

      • Funny Kim. Thinking an e-book could “sell out”.

      • Thinking an e-book could “sell out”.

        Kim’s a peak electrons doomsayer.

      • The useful bit that Tisdale gives us is a link to this site:
        http://climexp.knmi.nl/selectfield_obs.cgi?someone@somewhere

        If you know how to do statistical data analysis, this site is way more comprehensive than WoodForTrees.

      • Buy quick, or be squared.
        =======

      • I agree that the Climate Explorer is the most useful thing that Bob posted. Great tool.

      • The Piltdown Mann is over the target and has started a firestorm in climate science. Al Gore is over the target and dropping worthless gazillion green bank notes in carpet bombing of the financial centers. Joe Romm is over the target and blaring BIG LIES through his Rent-a-Center megatrombonaphone. Frozen turkeys, all of them. Oh, the Humanity.
        =====================

      • Bob T is over the target and dropping psychotropic cherries at $8 a bushel. Pretty good deal if you want to see all the pretty colors of his very special graphs…

      • “I agree that the Climate Explorer is the most useful thing that Bob posted. Great tool.”

        Like the OHC, the quality of the data retrieval services is going in one direction — upwards.

        That Dutch-based climate site has some really cool data reduction features, such as autocorrelation, histogram binning, etc

      • Bright links to hot sauce, sidj. See all the gory details of climate-making in the raw.
        ======================

      • Andrew Montford, the Bish, and Mike Smith, Tornado Maven, have new books out, too. Makin’ a list and checkin’ it twice. Gonna find out who’s hottie or ice.
        ==================

      • I hope he’s not in a Catalina.

      • Josh @ 12.38, one of the funniest comments on CE.

      • Take a peek @ Bob’s electrons. Electrifying peaks of insight from the isthmus, surveying Pacifica’s Balbonic plagues.
        ==========================

      • Kim @ 2.00, raising the (iso?) bar again.

      • I saw the ice bear, but I didn’t shoot him swimming.
        ===============

      • faustino – 1:38,

        It’s nice to know that at least someone gets my jokes. Or, in the name of skepticism, I guess I should say at least someone got one of my jokes. Once.

        BTW – in case you missed it:

        http://judithcurry.com/2012/10/10/communicating-uncertainties-in-natural-hazards-research/#comment-252311

      • Joshua @ 8.45: reinforces my concerns about “government failure.” And about ideologues, I’ve never been an ideologue but earlier in life I knew many. My views are based on my knowledge, experience and understanding rather than a pre-defined position, and are moderated by self-knowledge, including of my weaknesses and ignorance.

      • This is a prime example of the very odd logic of a mind bent on picking cherries. Bob T. writes:

        “USING A GLOBAL DATASET TO REPRESENT GLOBAL WARMING IS MISLEADING

        It sounds odd, but it’s true.

        By looking at a dataset on a global basis, one can only assume greenhouse gases play a role in the warming.”

        “”””””
        Huh? How does looking at a broad measure “assume” anything at all as to a cause? We simply want to know how much energy is accumulating in the whole planetary ocean (since it is, after all, connected). The global data could have shown the energy going down in the global ocean or the energy flat over the past 50 years. Looking at the global data assumes nothing at all. We are looking at global planetary energy. Bob Tisdale is 100% incorrect is stating that there is any assumption at all in the process of looking at a whole-planet metric. The global ocean metric is the most honest and actually most neutral way of trying to find out how much energy is accumulating in the whole system. His cherry-picked approach is actually the misleading one.

      • That is very odd for Tisdale to state that since heat is an extensive quantity, making it more suitable for summation than intensive quantities such as temperature.

      • Actually, in looking at the cherry-picked graphs that Bob created, I only now realized that he’s not even looking at actual ocean heat content in the regions that he’s cherry-picked, but in the change in the ANOMALIES over time. Wow. Not only does his cherry-picked data not actually looking at the metric of global ocean heat content, it has no possibility of even seeing this metric. In the case of Bob T’s cherry-picking– it truly is worse than we thought. He didn’t just pick the special cherries, he chose only his special cherry orchards!

      • And yet, the children toddle and tattle.
        ==========

      • Yes, odd statement about global heat content. It is, in fact, the best measure of the effects of a radiative energy imbalance. What causes the imbalance is not assumed. This just measures it. Having established the imbalance exists, the next question is where it comes from. GHGs fit the bill quantitatively, but maybe the skeptics will have to come up with something else when they come to this realization of what the OHC is telling them, because natural ocean currents don’t fit the bill for global deep OHC. It is the smoking gun minus all the fog that the surface temperature record has with its multiple influences.

      • Jim D | October 15, 2012 at 1:19 am |

        … global heat content … is … the best measure of the effects of a radiative energy imbalance … Having established the imbalance exists, the next question is where it comes from. GHGs fit the bill quantitatively

        Perhaps so. However, for GHGs to be the agent, the atmosphere would need to be warming. Which it hasn’t been doing for the last 16 years.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Bated, wrong on several counts.

        1) The past 10 years have been the warmest 10 years on instrument record for both the troposphere and the oceans.

        2) The troposphere does not transfer heat to the ocean directly, but controls the amount of heat leaving the ocean. The net energy flow is always from ocean to atmosphere. Thus, if temperatures plateau at higher levels in the troposphere as they have for the past 10 years, then that means that the rate of energy flow from the ocean to atmosphere is also static– i.e. energy is still accumulating at a constant rate in the ocean even if tropospheric temperatures are flat because the “control valve” is being held constant.

      • R. Gates, wrong on several counts.

        1) The past 10 years have been the warmest 10 years on instrument record for both the troposphere and the oceans.

        As someone else already pointed out to you, this doesn’t contradict the basic ‘Pause’ fact above – that these same ten years have seen no increase in atmospheric temperatures.

        2) …if temperatures plateau at higher levels in the troposphere as they have for the past 10 years, then that means that the rate of energy flow from the ocean to atmosphere is also static– i.e. energy is still accumulating at a constant rate in the ocean even if tropospheric temperatures are flat because the “control valve” is being held constant.

        Flawed logic. For additional energy to accumulate in the ocean, the ocean-atmosphere gradient has to increase – the control valve needs to open some. If the difference remains static (as before CO2 began to be added, say), the ocean temperatures would remain static.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Bated, you apparently don’t understand the concept of a control valve. You don’t have to open the valve filling up your bathtub more for it to continue to fill up if the rate that it is filling up still exceeds the rate that any water is leaving down the drain. Tropospheric temperatures control the rate of flow of energy from ocean to atmosphere.

      • Gates, the fact remains that for the oceans to keep warming as a result of atmospheric warming, the atmosphere itself has to keep warming.
        If the atmosphere remains as at a constant temperature, it cannot be the agent of ocean warming (slower cooling).
        (As I recall you even agreed on an earlier thread).

        So given the current 16-year Pause in atmospheric warming, it cannot be the agent of any ocean warming during that time.

      • Question for the Skeptical Warmist:

        If rising ocean temperatures are a consequence of rising air temperatures, would a once-off rise in air temperatures produce a rise in ocean temperatures that is
        a. once-off ?
        b. ongoing ?

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Sullivan,

        What do you mean by a “one off” rise in air temperature? El Ninos create a short-term rise in tropospheric temperatures, but they are most associated with energy leaving the ocean (which is what causes the SST’s to rise, and then that heat is transferred to the atmosphere).

        In general, when it comes to a long-term warming of the oceans, such as we’ve seen over the past 50 years, we are looking at some long-term external forcing that would be causing this warming. Something is causing the oceans to retain more heat than they are losing. As the flow of heat from ocean to atmosphere is dictated by the temperature gradient between the two.

      • Skeptical Warmist
        A once-off event is one that happens only once, as opposed to one that happens over and over.

        So if as you say ocean warming (via slower cooling) is regulated by atmospheric warming, would a once-off rise in atmospheric temperature ( At to At+1 say), would this result in
        - a once-off rise in ocean temperatures (Ot to Ot+1 say)
        - an ongoing rise in ocean temperatures (Ot rising indefinitely)

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Bated said:

        “BatedBreath | October 15, 2012 at 8:02 am |
        Gates, the fact remains that for the oceans to keep warming as a result of atmospheric warming, the atmosphere itself has to keep warming.”

        _______

        Bated, you may not understand why this is very incorrect, but I sure hope everyone else does.

      • I have attempted to explain this point several times, but now it is BatedBreath and Sullivan rather than the “Captains” that are having trouble understanding. For the oceans to warm, the atmosphere does not have to warm first. Just by virtue of having more CO2 at the same temperature, they would prevent some ocean cooling. This is because CO2 determines the downward IR flux, even if the temperature isn’t changing. This is why the heat content of the ocean can increase just because of the atmospheric CO2 increase, even when its temperature is not warming like now. This current period is a great object lesson for learning about the mechanism.

  19. “Overall, I would say that this is a very good article”

    Only if you have no regard for elementary accuracy. Start with the headline
    “Met Office report quietly released”

    Was there a report, quietly released or otherwise? Where?

    “The world stopped getting warmer almost 16 years ago, according to new data released last week. “

    That’s wrong, but that’s familiar ground. But “according to new data”? Hadcrut 4 has on any interpretation been rising faster recently than Hadcrut 3.

    “The new data, compiled from more than 3,000 measuring points on land and sea, was issued quietly on the internet, without any media fanfare, and, until today, it has not been reported.”

    Well, here’s what he said last January:
    “Based on readings from more than 30,000 measuring stations, the data was issued last week without fanfare by the Met Office and the University of East Anglia Climatic Research Unit. It confirms that the rising trend in world temperatures ended in 1997.”

    until today, it has not been reported?
    more than 30,000?

    What a beatup! Over release of a few months of Hadcrut 4 data, which show more warming that Hadcrut3, not less.

    • Dr David Whitehouse:
      “It is disappointing, if not misleading, that when the Hadcrut4 data was announced in March, with data only available to 2010 (a warm El Nino year), the Met Office promoted it with a press release and briefings to journalists. They told Louise Grey of the Daily Telegraph that the Hadcrut4 data showed that the world had warmed even more than expected in the past ten years and that the warming between 1998 – 2010 was 0.1 deg C.

      When the full dataset was available, in the past week, showing global temperatures to August 2012, and telling a very different story, no press release was produced.”

      • Well, here is the news that they would be reporting. Very little different from Hadcrut 3, just a continuation of slightly higher warming. It’s not a “very different story”.

        The interest in March was largely because Hadcrut 4 dealt with the “bucket” issue from mid C20.

  20. Dear Professor Curry–

    Do you ever smile? I regret asking such a personal question, and yet I look at the Daily Mail article and wonder if they are doing you dirty, or you’re just a sour-puss.

    Surely you smile at babies (human, kitten, puppy, or otherwise), weddings, and other experiences of joy at the human condition?

    Maybe a smiling Judith on the home page of this site to dispel the attempt to portray you as a joyless person?

  21. Bob Fernley-Jones

    R. Gates | October 14, 2012 at 10:41 pm.

    Sorry, but your protestation that the last decade has been the warmest on the instrumental record does not alter the fact that the same record shows that there has been a plateau in global average temperatures. (AKA as flat, or a pause in warming, and similar expressions of fact).

    If you look at a range of T record sources back to the 1940’s, note that a linear trend from ~(1935 – 1945) was also flat and until that time was the warmest decade on record. Was that the end of the world? No, although unfortunately the record shows a substantial period of cooling that followed. Furthermore, if you examine a broader period of say ~(1930 – 1950) the linear trend was also flat and the warmest 20-years on record. Oh dear, the sky was falling in even before a big growth in CO2 emissions!
    Perhaps the easiest illustration to understand this is the Hadcrut3 graph following, although strangely, they use a 21-year CMP filtered smoothing, and the last 10 years of the black line are speculative on their part what with absence of data 10-years into the future beyond the end centre point. (and arguably should be ignored).
    http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/temperature/nhshgl.gif

    A conclusion that can be drawn from this is that it is not sensible to draw short-term linear trends on what appears to be cyclical raw data or at best; confusing noise or very disturbing factors arguably attributed to natural cycles.

    The earliest relevant paper concerning natural cycles that I’m aware of is:
    L.B. Klyashtorin & A.A. Lyubushin 2003
    http://www.biokurs.de/treibhaus/180CO2/Fuel_Consumption_and_Global_dT-1.pdf
    Interestingly, nine years later their prediction of what we see now is remarkably accurate although it was based entirely on recognition of a natural cycle that they did not attempt to explain.

    • “Interestingly, nine years later their prediction of what we see now is remarkably accurate although it was based entirely on recognition of a natural cycle that they did not attempt to explain.”

      Intuition is a wonderful thing.

    • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

      Bob,

      You make good points, but overall, I care about the broadest measurements we can make in Earth’s non-tectonic energy system. The energy fluctuations in the weakest and lowest thermal inertia part of the system (i.e. the troposphere) is assumed as is that there will be natural variabilty over years and even decades and that global climate models will never be able to capture this. If global ocean heat content as measured down to the deepest levels of the ocean declines over a decade or more and the Arctic sea ice suddenly actually recovers to previous summer levels that we saw in the 1970′s I’d begin to have serious reservations about AGW. Because of my willingness to have some reasonable metric whereby AGW could be falsified (and actually remain actively looking for it), I keep to the spirit of being a true skeptic in the more general sense.

      • “some reasonable metric whereby AGW could be falsified”

        How about air temperature? If the air isn’t warming, the greenhouse effect either isn’t happening, or is being overwhelmed. In which case, either way, what are we worried about?

      • We’re worried about the travesties. The travesty of Kevin Trenberth losing all that heat all over the place, the travesty of Michael Piltdown Mann molesting old trees and young statistics, the travesty of Lewandowsky projecting his illness through the Hall of Mirrored Ethics, the travesty of Phil Jones knowing in his bones the hollowness of his work, the travesty, the travesties, the trespasses on decency, on logic, and who am I to forgive them?
        ================

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Sullivan,

        As far as the more important of the two, lots of energy being stored in the ocean is more significant than the temperature of the troposphere. As far as being worried….still accessing any need for that. Generally though, worry is rather unproductive.

      • Latimer Alder

        @r gates

        It’s the atmosphere that we all live in, not the oceans.

        If there’s no effect in the atmosphere, exactly what should we be wetting our knickers about?

      • Gates, you didn’t address my point : if the air isn’t warming, it means the greenhouse effect isn’t noticeable, ie CO2 not causing warming as feared. I’m not saying ocean temperature isn’t important. Just doesn’t seem to be related to air temperature (and hence not CO2).

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Latimer,

        Can’t speak for what you should or shouldn’t be wetting your knickers about, but as go the oceans so goes everything else on this planet. A healthy ocean means a healthy biosphere. We land dwellers need the ocean to be healthy every bit as much as the creatures that dwell there.

      • kim,

        one of your best yet.

      • Latimer Alder

        @ r gates

        ‘ A healthy ocean means a healthy biosphere. We land dwellers need the ocean to be healthy every bit as much as the creatures that dwell there.’

        Trite stuff taken straight from the Greenpeace version of the Sunday School.Bible for Infants. But pretty limited as serious science.

        Is there any reason to expect that a slightly warmer ocean will not be a healthy ocean? How do we know? If so what is the optimum temperature for it? How do we know? And where on the globe now has that temperature?

  22. This goes some way to explain why Jones once said

    Why should I show you my data when I know you’ll try and find something wrong with it ?

    . He’s known for some time the data wasn’t complying with the whole politically-motivated and politically-financed drive to dupe the public and sell CAGW.

    • Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead. Damn, it’s an iceberg!
      =============

      • Hey,

        No torpedo damning. I once made my living with them.

      • Think what a torpedo would do to an iceberg.

        OK, there’s probably a YouTube of it somewhere.
        ============

      • kim,

        Not much. A Mk 48 (last time I saw one) carried ~ 680 lbs of PBXN. While that produces an impressive explosion and will shatter the keel and lift a 8,000 ton ship almost completely out of the water, it would hardly be noticed by a berg.

        Although I was in the minority in my division for thinking it, I held that we would have to put at least 3 and possibily as many as 4 or 5 of them into one of our Nimitz class carriers to sink it.

      • Spruance class DD vs Mk 48

  23. Global warming stopped 16 years ago!

    The figures, which have triggered debate among climate scientists, reveal that from the beginning of 1997 until August 2012, there was no discernible rise in aggregate global temperatures.

    That figure using woodfortrees=>
    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut3vgl/from:1998/plot/hadcrut3vgl/from:1998/trend/plot/hadcrut3vgl/from:1998/trend/offset:0.1

  24. Pingback: ¿Cuánto calentamiento tiene que haber los próximos 8 años para que no corramos a gorrazos al IPCC? « PlazaMoyua.com

  25. How many times does it need to be pointed out that the “the warmest decade on record” does not mean that the decade in question cannot have been at a steady temperature?

    • If global warming stopped in 1997, how can the last decade be the warmest on record?

      Fact is that drawing a trend line from 1997 does not tell you if warming has stopped or is ongoing. The period is too short. There’s actually been a faster rate of warming since 1980-present, than from 1980-1997

      • David Springer

        Do know the difference between ‘warm’ and ‘warming’?

        If you did then you should realize how the past decade could be warm and not warming at the same time. Duh.

        First rule of holes, little buddy.

    • During the warmest decade on record, there was no warming. Where is the problem with that ?

  26. It is good news that there is no global warming rate at present. Australian politics are curremtly dominated by the greens so this will hard news for them.

    However some people have been quick to label this as a ‘pause’, implying that worse is to come with vague references to natural internal affects: the greatest of which is El Nino which is not understand and others even murkier. Read my own theoretical model at: http://members.iinet.net.au/~alexandergbiggs and if you agree with me, the key to climate and CO2 affects is what happened in 1940. Understand that and ypu will understand future climate as well as the currant ‘pause’.

  27. So how does the shaft of the ‘hockey stick’ fit in with the last 16 years global near surface temperature?
    How does the relative % of CO2 in the atmosphere correlate to global near surface temperature in the last 16 years?

    Any greenhouse gas enthusiast who can make square pegs fit into round holes must surely be in line for the Booker Prize for best contemporary fiction.

  28. We don’t know what natural variability is doing.’

    This year it is 15 years is too short, next year it’ll be 16 years it too short, the year after 17 years is too short.

    It is time this nonsense stopped. This is undermining not only the credibility of climate “science” but also every other scientific discipline.

  29. Hey Judith,
    One of the quotes from Climategate files was:

    Yet in 2009, when the plateau was already becoming apparent and being discussed by scientists, he told a colleague in one of the Climategate emails: ‘Bottom line: the “no upward trend” has to continue for a total of 15 years before we get worried.

    I’d like to focus on the phrase ‘before we get worried’. Now ask yourself why anyone would get worried about a level temperature trend. It is pretty clear to see the alarmists motivations showing through here.

    Cheers
    Robin

    • I have an oddly symmetrical dilemma with the warming catastrophists who fear it may not warm like they predict and bewail. I’d love for it to warm instead of cool like I predict and bewail.
      ==================

      • someone recently used a phrase about ‘climate hypochondiacs’ which seems more fitting for some of the climate activists. I’ve met a number, and they are genuinely ‘terrified’ of future climate.

        It was Eduardo Zorita:
        http://klimazwiebel.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/interview-with-eduardo-zorita.html

        Are there “alarmists”? Is that a good term?

        Yes, I think there are alarmists, if by that term we include those that see anthropogenic forcing behind every change we see in the environment. Perhaps alarmist is not the right term. I would rather use the expression ‘climate hypochondriacs’.

      • Here’s the asymmetry, which I point out to an audience already acutely aware of it: A cooling globe is a terrifying and an alarming one; a warming one, meh, will sustain more total life and more diversity of life.
        ===================

    • Robin
      Exactly. Would the warmists on this blog all please confirm that if, as appears to be the case, there is no warming to worry about, it is unreservedly good news for mankind.

      • It’s no good news for the warmists. They’re praying for more warming.

      • He was talking as a scientist. It’s worrying for their understanding of how the climate works.

      • That too. They don’t want to understand – they want to confirm A(GHG/CO2)GW.

      • AGW is already confirmed, what they are trying to understand is how exactly it will manifest. Climate skeptics for example think AGW will cause an increase in cloud cover and reduction in sunlight. Wonder what the impact will be on plants (!?)

      • > AGW is already confirmed

        Obviously not. We have some basic principles, but are still nowhere near putting any numbers on it or making any worthwhile predictions.

      • Confirmed? Au contrair mon ami. By 2020 you will be ashamed that you believed in it or you will deny that you ever believed in it.

    • nzrobin

      The “before we get worried” quote is not much different from Trenberth’s “travesty” quote.

      It appears these guys want global warming to occur, in order to prove their hypothesis that we are causing “bad” global warming, so we can force top-down actions to stop the global warming they now want.

      Is there something basically screwy with this picture?

      (Or is it really not about global warming at all?)

      Max

  30. The Met Office has a reply that seems to owe more to PR than science, including a very odd graph, seemingly contrived to give just what impression?

    http://metofficenews.wordpress.com/2012/10/14/met-office-in-the-media-14-october-2012/

    Why can’t they just use this official graph,
    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcrut4/diagnostics.html

    which shows all the data, ie warming since 1850, periods of warming, cooling and late 2oth century warming and 21st century, pausing’ or plateau. It appears he response is just spin.

    They do however confrm at least one point, by stating a cliam of per decae rate of warming, which is exactly HALF that required to get us all to 2C by 2050. and every relatively cool year perhaps for a few years will see that rate drop further.

    (I also have 2 comments pending moderation at the Met Office News blog, for about a day now)

    ps – I think they choose the photo, to make out you were cross with Phil Jones, as it was put next to his.. ;-)

    • Barry Woods,

      They do however confrm at least one point, by stating a cliam of per decae rate of warming, which is exactly HALF that required to get us all to 2C by 2050.

      Yes… given the start date which Rose has chosen. The trends for the last 14, 15, 17 and 18 years are all greater than for the last 16, wich is what the Met Office are referring to when they say

      As we’ve stressed before, choosing a starting or end point on short-term scales can be very misleading.

      It’s not just spin, it’s the truth.

    • Barry

      That Met Office graph is intended to distract the viewer from the fact that there has been an “unexplained pause” in global warming, despite unabated human GHG emissions (principally CO2) and CO2 concentrations reaching record levels.

      It’s the old “shell and pea” game.

      “Now you see it, now you don’t”

      Max

  31. Daily Mail Churnalist misquotes. News at eleven.

    Evidently Prof. Curry operated on the Bushian principle of the one about fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on you.

    • Latimer Alder

      @eli rabbett

      Care to turn your post into an understandable point?

      Or are you too infested with the

      ‘speaking in esoteric riddles to in a forlorn attempt to make one look clever and disguise the fact one has nothing relevant to say’

      virus that seems to be sweeping through the alarmist commentators here of late? Joshua has it, AFOTBS has it. ‘Willard’ is now completely in its thrall. I think it was originally brought here by Web Hub Telescope, presumably from another planet

      It’s dangerous stuff. The only cure is clear thinking and straightforward direct writing

      Example :

      ‘The cat on the mat’

      Try it for a few weeks. You’ll soon find your distressing symptoms disappear.

      Simples!

      • Latie said:

        “The only cure is clear thinking and straightforward direct writing”

        Another case of massive transference and projection. Latie is the commenter who will don multiple sockpuppet disguises, write long diatribes filled with imaginary dialog, and otherwise substitute rhetoric for useful dialectic into the arguments.

        Note how Latie attacks Eli, who actually does a lot of interesting work, including his latest series of blog posts where he helpfully describes his use of Python to check out the data that Anthony Watts is evaluating:
        http://rabett.blogspot.ca/2012/10/wattsbusters.html

        No doubt that this is a psychological projection of Latimer’s inability to do anything useful onto a scientist who does practical analysis, and does it with style. Ultimately, the root of this may be bitterness and jealousy on Latimer’s part.

        “Simples!”

        Yes, indeed, it is all so simple, understanding the fake skeptic’s mind .

      • WebHubTelescope,

        Steve Milesworthy suggests fruit machines:

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/25540695794

      • Latimer Alder

        @Web Hub Telescope

        If Socratic dialogues were good enough for Socrates, they’re good enough for me.

        If you find one I’ve written that doesn’t make my point clearly and directly, please point it out and I’ll be happy to clarify for you and/or rewrite if needed.

      • > If Socratic dialogues were good enough for Socrates, they’re good enough for me.

        This sentence is not clear.

        Nor is it direct.

        Nor addresses WebHubTelescope’s point.

        Nor does its philosophical content makes sense, since it does seem to confuse a dialectical process with a self-congratulating one.

      • Re: “fruit machines”, I missed that one.

        I think Latimer has extended well beyond his reach. The use of multiple sockpuppets provides diminishing returns once people catch on. But then again, his primary audience likely eggs him on, all in the service of FUD.

        You are right, Willard, it’s never-ending.

      • WebHubTelescope,

        Beware that Soclates’ pushback effects comes in three degrees:

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/9755075050

      • Latimer Alder

        @webbie, @willard

        I’m deeply flattered that my simple remarks and questions here so frighten you that you feel the need to discuss them on another blog.

        Must be touching a few nerves……………

      • WebHubTelescope,

        You might notice that Soclates does not seem to realize that the two posts were excerpted from Judy’s.

      • Willard, The Latimer is in fact a Stirling Engine. It works via the cyclic compression and expansion of gas.

        Remarkably it is one more of the potential renewable energy technologies available to mankind in the coming years.

        Perhaps multiple sockpuppet names are for the good. Socrates Windfarm would also work for Latimer.

      • Steven Mosher

        Webby.

        Eli is both known for and proud of his unclear elipitical comments.
        It would be charitable of you to acknowledge that.

      • WebHubTelescope,

        You certainly can concede that Eli’s style is not always clear and direct. Sometimes, Eli even talks about being pedagogical. Sometimes.

        In any case, I’m sure you can agree with me that Eli’s main point in the article the escapes Soclates’ inquisivite mind is expressed with this sentence:

        > Being able to *show* the non believers rather than just *telling* them seems to be helpful…

        This point is also repeated in the next paragraph:

        > [T]he global-temperature anomaly, involving nothing more than simple averaging, is something that bunnies can explain to non-technical friends/relatives in a way that they actually *get it* (at least to some extent).

        This point is also repeated in the last one:

        > This seems to be the Watts-skeptic crowd’s biggest vulnerability — they’ve gone out on a limb by being consistently wrong about stuff that I can explain to high-school/junior-college-educated folks…

        That half of the words Eli wrote are related to his main point might not have been enough to be clear and direct, this time.

        Bad bunny.

        ***

        For charity’s sake, we should also note that the post in question has been mainly written by Caerbannog.

        Here are the sections:

        1. How we can know what the earth’s temperature is
        2 What sort of games Watts has been playing
        3 How real skeptics can beat him by reducing the data themselves
        4 Where to get that data

        Section 2 might have something to do with Eli’s main point. A quote:

        > The big problem with the Watts approach is that he and his followers have not bothered to perform any global-average temperature calculations to test the claims they’ve been making (i.e. claims about UHI, homogenization, “dropped stations”, etc.)

        http://rabett.blogspot.ca/2012/10/wattsbusters.html

        Not that all this should distract us from more pressing matters: Eli’s lack of clarity and directness, which you certainly should acknowledge.

      • Eli writes a blog, and posts some interesting stuff in it. Like a lot of blogs, I don’t always get to it, but when I read it, I pick up some info. His rabbit sidekick always reminded me of the author Updike, who I haven’t read.

      • > Care to turn your post into an understandable point?

        “Churnalism”:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Churnalism

        “Fool me twice”:

        http://judithcurry.com/2011/10/30/mail-on-best/

        “Nothing new under the sun”:

        http://bible.cc/ecclesiastes/1-9.htm

        Simples.

      • > I think it was originally brought here by Web Hub Telescope, presumably from another planet.

        No clear, nor direct.

        And false to boot.

        I was here first.

      • Latimer Alder

        @willard

        Happy for you to take the ‘credit’ for bringing the

        ‘speaking in esoteric riddles to in a forlorn attempt to make one look clever and disguise the fact one has nothing relevant to say’

        virus here if you wish to.

        Though few would view this ‘achievement’ as a badge to be worn with pride. But if the cap fits…….

      • Soclates,

        If my few remarks of questions make you &c, I must have struck a nerve.

        Simples.

      • Latimer -

        virus that seems to be sweeping through the alarmist commentators here of late? Joshua has it

        In the name of skepticism (as opposed to “skepticism”) – please identify what evidence you have that justifies you characterizing me as an “alarmist.” You have done this a number of times now, sometimes in ways considerably more nasty than you have just done. Surely, you must have abundant evidence to base such nastiness. Please, share some of it.

        If you are unable (or perhaps unwilling) to produce any actual evidence, one might say that you’re an alarmist about alarmism.

      • Latimer Alder

        @joshua

        If you so assert, I am happy to exclude you from the list of ‘alarmist’ commentators.

        It may come as a surprise to some here who have followed your postings (and to the many more who just ignore them), but if you do not feel that ‘alarmist’ is a term with which you wish to be associated, I will of course refrain from using the term in future.

      • > If you so assert, I am happy to exclude you from the list of ‘alarmist’ commentators.

        To Soclates, everyone’s an alarmist by defaut.

        To be excluded from his sweeping generalities, one must ask him.

        Reminds me of mail spam.

      • Latimer,

        If you so assert, I am happy to exclude you from the list of ‘alarmist’ commentators.

        Don’t be a weasel.

        I asked you to show evidence for your claim. You have made similar claims multiple times – and at times accompanied your claims with some associated nastiness; so despite that you now seem to be waffling, it seems that you were at least previously quite confident that evidence for your claims existed.

        Nowhere did I request that you remove me from your list. Either way I don’t care at a personal level.

        My point was not that I object to the classification (I expect to be mis-classifed by tribalists, and if I cared about it I wouldn’t post my comments) to show your habit of making claims for which you have no evidence. I think your habit is instructive as to clarifying the oft-claimed identification of skeptic by people who are actually “skeptics.”

        Do you have any evidence? You seem to have the confidence that would suggest the evidence is abundant. If so, please provide just a smidgeon.

      • Steven Mosher

        ‘To Soclates, everyone’s an alarmist by defaut.”

        hmm. interesting proposition. Perhaps you can get to the truth of it by asking him directly. have some integrity willard. Go ahead an ask him and then be charitable. We will watch and see if you get it right. I lay odds you will, but still it will be fun to see if you can actually do it.

      • Moshpit,

        Will do, although I believe that you do get my point.

        An auto-include like the one I alluded to does seem built-in the speech act he just did.

        By anyone, I meant anyone who stands in his way to ask tough questions and profer soclatic remarks from his soapbox are alarmists.

        I’m not sure he ever said anything about those who run wild about alarmism, except perhaps that they’re asking tough questions and believe that anyone who talks to them are liars.

        One has to wonder why.

        ***

        Dear Soclates,

        Moshpit does seem to wonder if you could clarify this speech act of yours:

        > If you so assert, I am happy to exclude you from the list of ‘alarmist’ commentators.

        It does seem to presuppose that the assertion that one does not belong to the class of “alarmist” commentators suffices to be taken out of that class.

        It also seems to presuppose that you have the power to judge who belongs to the class of “alarmist” commentators.

        Am I reading you correctly?

        Many thanks!

      • Latimer Alder

        @willard

        I drew up a short list of alarmist commentators infested with the virus of

        ‘‘speaking in esoteric riddles to in a forlorn attempt to make one look clever and disguise the fact one has nothing relevant to say’

        You are on it, AFOTBS is in it, Web Hub Telescope is on it. Joshua was on it, but objected to being called an alarmist. I removed him from the alarmist list.

        That was it. No more, No mountains, just a molehill.

        If the virus makes you need to create some vast conspiracy worldview based on this simple transaction, knock yourself out.

      • Latimer,

        You did a bit more than that, but paying due diligence to your bad faith is getting dull. You have no other evidence for my alarmism than the fact that my comments are not rooting for your team. You are using my name for your sloganeering and, pour ajouter l’insulte à l’insulte, in a shrieking tone that is way more alarming than mine.

        My name is my honor. You are bugging me. You should stop.

        This last week should make you feel why.

      • Latimer,

        Joshua was on it, but objected to being called an alarmist.

        As I said:

        Nowhere did I request that you remove me from your list. Either way I don’t care at a personal level.

        As willard said:

        paying due diligence to your bad faith is getting dull.

        I asked you for evidence for your claim. You have made it multiple times – sometimes in a nasty fashion. I have asked you, more than once, for evidence for your claim.

        Please remember, the difference between a skeptic and a “skeptic” is that a “skeptic” makes claims for which he has no evidence.. Are you a “skeptic” or a skeptic, Latimer? You make the call.

      • Latimer Alder

        “Wabbit-talk” is different from “people-talk”.

        Max

    • Eli

      Can we see your graph showing the correct data and same end points? Thank you

      tonyb

    • Gee Eli,

      Bush bashing. How unexpected.

  32. Are GCMs deeply flawed? Well, you have at least 3 that produce a centennial oscillation in the Pacific and we don’t know if it is real or if model imperfections are creating it. What initializes it? What feedbacks perpetuate it? What causes the oscillation to reverse? What do all these factors do under external forcing? I’d say the models should be shelved until the scientists using them understand what they are doing.

    HAL? What are you doing, HAL?

    • Joe's World(progressive evolution)

      Steven,

      The model approach is a totally mathematical concept.
      You need no sun, no atmospheric pressure, no planetary tilting, nothing that actually constitutes temperatures or changes due to factors beyond current model input. The overall approach misses vastly many anomalies and “averages” an orb which is impossible to actual mathematics as every point is unique and at very different velocities, thicknesses of atmosphere and heat transfer mechanisms.

      You can learn more by just trying to transfer the data that science currently generated to an actual globe and see their is a huge error going on.

  33. Judith, I’m sorry about the photo. You’re a good sport about it. I think they sometimes use that one (it’s the second time I’ve seen it I believe) because it makes you look feisty Maybe if as someone suggested, you posted a more flattering one on your blog the papers might start using that instead.

    I’m interested in the discussion of to what extent the models are flawed. .I don’t think you’d call them “a little bit flawed, ” would you? How flawed would the models have to be before you’d feel comfortable with the term “deeply.” It doesn’t seem as if they need merely a little tweak here, or a bit of an adjustment there. Otherwise they’d have done that already, no?

    • That photo is Joe Romm’s favorite, he uses it when he is trying to discredit me in some way.

      Re the models. The issue is what you use them for, see my recent presentation Climate models: fit for what purpose?
      http://curryja.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/rs-uncertainty-12.pdf

      The issue is not so much the models themselves, but the design of the simulation and interpretation of the results, and the level of confidence to ascribe to them for a specific application.

      • David Springer

        http://i.ytimg.com/vi/zPyhT24m7ng/0.jpg

        Joe’s probably jealous that you still have hair on your head. It’s glaringly obvious in the photo of him above. I hope the people facing the witness bench had sunglasses available. Or better yet welder’s googles. ;-)

      • > That photo is Joe Romm’s favorite, he uses it when he is trying to discredit me in some way.

        As partial support for the concept of “social priming”, it seems to me that there is a statistically significant increase in the incidence of screeds by activists after being primed with this photo [1].

        [1] http://climateaudit.org/2012/10/14/lewandowsky-and-hide-the-decline/

      • To be fair, the chimp photographs better than Prof. Lewandoski. But it isn’t relative, as one’s looks should have no bearing on one’s intellectual abilities.

        That said, based on his last paper, Prof. Lewandoski has given us all reason to wonder whether the chimp could produce better work.

      • Gee timg56,

        Lew bashing. Et cetera.

      • willard,

        If you consider pointing out the obviously poor work of Prof Lewandoski’s latest paper as bashing, then I’m guilty. Personally, I would only consider it bashing if there was no substance to the point other than spite. I don’t know the man.

        If I put out substandard work, I expect to be hammered and held account for it. Were Prof Lew a friend, I’d be telling him to stop digging the hole he’s created and own up to the poor quality of his paper. But then I am of the opinion that personal responsibility matters more than been seen as right or wrong on a subject.

      • judith

        Cheer up. ANY photo of Joe Romm discredits him.

        Max

        PS Solution to the problem (at least for interviews). Provide your selection of your mugshot to the interviewer, and tell him you will only give the interview if he uses that picture. Basta!

      • +1. Exactly. The issue in not the models themselves. The models are always wrong, so the issue is those who either make excuses or cast blame for the models being wrong because they simply fail to understand either the limitations and valid usefulness of the models.

  34. I think this particular quote is very interesting. ” Asked about a prediction that the Met Office made in 2009 – that three of the ensuing five years would set a new world temperature record – he made no comment. ”

    I suspect the UK Met. Office would like to forget Smith el al, Science, August 2007. Between now and 2014, we are going to see all sorts of excuses as to why the predicitons made in this paper should be disregarded.

    • Joe's World(progressive evolution)

      Jim,

      How many changes are in your country by the “global warming” scare that pushed our politicians into policies that are generating a massive burden on everyones budgets for bad to terrible technology that have to be massively subsidized for many years?
      Not quite as bad in Canada as in a few other countries but still I am paying for others stupidity to what they have been advised.

    • Pretty devastating Jim. At least they could have come up with some transparent b.s. The faithful will believe anything they say. Anything at all. “No comment” looks borderline pathetic.

    • “Asked about a prediction that the Met Office made in 2009 – that three of the ensuing five years would set a new world temperature record – he made no comment. ””

      The met office claimed he never asked that.

      • lolwot

        The met office claimed he never asked that.

        Sure, the Met Office made that claim

        To paraphrase Mandy Rice-Davies:

        “Well they would say that, wouldn’t they?”

        Max

    • The Met Office has a webpage dedicated to Smith et al, and they have absolutely no reason at all to forget one of the first attempts at ‘the “said to be impossible” decadal forecasting.

    • Steve Milesworthy

      It would seem that the Met Office are calling Rose a liar when they say:”he did not ask us to make a comment about them [the decadal climate predictions].”

      My impression (and I think it’s a reasonably well-informed impression) is that the Met Office might say that the decadal predictions can only include forcings that are observable. As there appear to be changes in forcings that cannot currently be accurately observed, there will be potential errors in the forecasts. The other answer possibly is that HadCRUT3 did not pick up some of the warming that HadCRUT4 apparently has, which has led to the forecast looking worse than it really is.

      But the Met Office have been tasked to write a report about the warming hiatus, so I guess you’ll get to hear more soon.

  35. Well the Met office response seems to be a bit of a cherry pick itself, (1979) the start of a short term warming period.

    A couple of years ago Phil Jones gave a BBC ineterview, about the lack of significan warming… which drew a lot of attention. (and it also showed historic rates of warming, similar to late 2oth century ( thus could it be natural?)
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8511670.stm

    in 2011 Phill Jones spoke to the BBC and said global warming now ‘significant’ as he had include now 2010 data (a warm year, as shown by ranking)).
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13719510

    Phil Jones:
    “The trend over the period 1995-2009 was significant at the 90% level, but wasn’t significant at the standard 95% level that people use,” Professor Jones told BBC News.

    “Basically what’s changed is one more year [of data]. That period 1995-2009 was just 15 years – and because of the uncertainty in estimating trends over short periods, an extra year has made that trend significant at the 95% level which is the traditional threshold that statisticians have used for many years.”

    Since that BBC article, 2011 was cooler than 2010, and by your ranking graph, one of the cooler years of the 21st century. Thus should not Phil Jones be contactingthe BBC again with his data recalculated, to show ‘not significant’

    one rule for climate scientists? (this does seem a silly game to play with stats)

    Ideally the full temp dataset should be shown, (ie HAdcrut 4) but as both the Met Office, and Jones can choose starting points, they do not have much complaint when others do..

    It is worth mentioning that the rate of per decade warming, stated here, is about currently HALF that required to hit 2C by 2050, and that perhaps Judith Curry has a piont about the models. Soon we wil find where 2012 sits in the ranking of warm years.

    If Jones felt able to recaluclate with one additional year, why not 2011 (and then 2012) which I expect will merely confirm no significance, and that the ‘pause’ has extended

    • The central issue is that skeptics are deliberately choosing start points that *barely* fail 95% significance. *barely* means the result is unstable. With the addition of more monthly data the significance can easily dance above and below the 95% mark several times.

      With addition of more data the error bars on the trend shrink which is why scientists recommend using long periods to calculate trends and skeptics abhor the idea because it doesn’t give them the result they are after. So you might well find with the addition of 2011 and 2012 the warming since 1995 is still significant, despite both years being cooler than 2010.

      “If Jones felt able to recaluclate with one additional year, why not 2011 (and then 2012)”

      Because he was only exposing the fragility of the skeptic claim. He’s done it now, we all know (should) realize that cherrypicking a point that *barely* fails 95% significance is a fools game.

      Also if he did keep announcing whenever it dropped below or rose above 95% significance he would be accused of changing his mind constantly by the know nothings who read the Daily Mail, etc. They don’t understand statistics. They think trends should be set in stone. If Jones keeps coming out saying “now warming since 1997 is significant…now it’s not…now it is” people will think he’s flip-flopping. I saw that exact response when he corrected the record about warming significance since 1995.

      It’s better to just let the skeptics stew in their own ignorance than join in. If they want to imagine warming since 1995 being at 92% significance means global warming has stopped, they are beyond help.

  36. I was brought up to believe in the Principal of Parsimony; never believe a complex explanation when there is a simple one available. Just about all the empirical data we have, strongly suggests that all the changes we have ever observed, have been caused by natural variations, and adding CO2 to the atmosphere has a negligible effect on anything. This latest data just adds to the list. The most likely driver of climate is, of course, changes in clouds. As Roy Spencer has estimated, a change of +/- 2% in cloud extent is all that is required to explain all the temperature varitions we have seen. And we cannot measure cloud extent to anything like this accuracy.

    What the empirical data shows is that temperatures have been rising ever since the LIA. There is no sign that this trend has changed in any way. So, it seems safe to assume that the future will exhibit the same sort of trends as the past. Since we have had reasonable records, the trend has been around 0.06 C per decade. There have been periods when the trend has been considerably greater than this, and periods when it has been considerably less. Every time one trend persists for some years, then the other trend arrives, and the overall trend stays the same.

    This is precisely what has happened recently. In the latter part of the 20th century, there was a trend of rise of global temperatures that was greater than the average of around 0.06 C. This was, wrongly, interpreted by the proponents of CAGW as a sign that CAGW was real. Now we are observing the trend to a rise of temperature that is considerably less than 0.06 C per decade. Situation normal. If the past is a guide to the future, this is exactly what we should expect.

    The simple notion as to why sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctic are negaively correlated, put forward by Svensmark, is that more clouds cause the majority of the earth to cool; except in Antarcica, where the albedo of the ice is so high, that more clouds cause warming.

    Changes in clouds are by far the simplest explanation of what is happening with global temperatures. This pause in temperature rise that we are now discussing, is merely a little more in formation that supports this hypothesis. Just look at
    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut3vgl/compress:12/plot/gistemp/compress:12/detrend:0.1/offset:-0.075/plot/hadcrut3vgl/scale:0.00001/detrend:-0.83/offset:-0.35/plot/hadcrut3vgl/scale:0.0001/detrend:-0.83/offset:-0.9/plot/hadcrut3vgl/scale:0.0001/detrend:-0.83/offset:-0.64/plot/hadcrut3vgl/scale:0.00001/offset:2/plot/hadcrut3vgl/scale:0.00001/offset:-2

    • Fairy tales are simple:

      Gtimm’s Recovery from the LIA

      What a load of total crap.

      • When did the LIA end? It’s an arbitrary guess. When did the conditions that caused the LIA end? I would say it was when CO2 ppm began recovering to ~280 ppm. The recovery began in the late 1700s and ended in the early 1800s. What would the natural events have looked like subsequent to that? Approximately like the dashed red line (a lake region in Scandinavia).

      • JCH, you write “When did the LIA end? ”

        That is irrelevant to my argument. We do not have good data going back to the LIA. We only have good data since around 1850. My detailed discuassion only starts around 1850. So, please, let us discuss what has happened subsequent to around 1850.

      • Call it recovery from the interruption of the recovery from the little ice age, since you are so technical. 1816 and 1900 were little recovery interruptus moments.

      • JCH,

        Thanks. It seems that the auditing sciences is having a turn of faith:

        > The idea that present temperatures are “unprecedented during the past several centuries” was definitely not original to the Mann hockey stick, as this view dated back to at least Hubert Lamb and could be said to be a consensus view.

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/33641595222

        Seems that all these hurly burlies might not have been about “unprecedented”.

      • JCH you write “What a load of total crap..”

        As I have observed many times, fair enough. I have never claimed that what I write is totally scientifically accurate. I have made mistakes in the past. I will make mistakes in the future. I hope to learn from my mistakes.

        You say whay I write is “total crap:” Then what I would like to know is WHY is it total crap? You ought to have some science on which to base this statement. What is this science? Where I am wrong? And in some detail, please, if you are going to be credible.

    • Jim

      Excellent summary!

    • Jim: In the latter part of the 20th century, there was a trend of rise of global temperatures that was greater than the average of around 0.06 C. This was, wrongly, interpreted by the proponents of CAGW as a sign that CAGW was real. Now we are observing the trend to a rise of temperature that is considerably less than 0.06 C per decade. Situation normal.

      Jim, you are supported by the following paper:

      Wu et al.
      On the time-varying trend in global-mean surface temperature

      …we showed that the rapidity of the warming in the late twentieth century was a result of concurrence of a secular warming trend and the warming phase of a multidecadal (~65-year period) oscillatory variation and we estimated the contribution of the former to be about 0.08 deg C per decade since ~1980.

      http://bit.ly/PDBWyZ

      IPCC’s 0.2 deg C per decade warming is a transient one and the true warming rate is only 0.08 deg C per decade, just slightly greater than the long-term trend. IPCC mistakenly assumed the warming trend from 1970 to 2000 to be a change in the trend from the long-term trend. That is wrong. The 1970-2000 warming is the warming phase of the multidecadal oscillation. When this oscillation moves to its cooling phase, there will be little warming or a slight cooling during the period from 2000 to 2030 like that happened after 1880 and after 1940.
      .

    • Jim Cripwell

      I agree that what you have written makes sense, even if JCH has had difficulty understanding (or explaining) it.

      Max

      • Max, You and I agree that the proponents of CAGW refuse to discuss our science on Climate Etc. I am going to see if JCH can stay out of a discussion this time. He opened the door, and I hope to keep it open. If he doesn’t respond by tomorrow morning, I will start a new discussion, and see if I can, somehow, persuade him to join in, in a proper scientific way.

      • I may not be a proponent of CAGW, but being a “warmist” and a true skeptic in the broad sense I’ll gladly discuss any theories.

  37. Pingback: Sexton år utan global uppvärmning | The Climate Scam

  38. HadCRUT1, HadCRUT2, HadCRUT3, HadCRUT4, HadCRUT5, … these climate modelers are just shameless. They can never escaped their GIGO land, pathetic. We, the pathetic tax payers pay the price and these shameless modelers get the grants and funds continuing their GIGO business.

  39. Having momentarily been involved on professional public relations, I can only suggest having a friendly University Press Office photographer come around and take a series of head shots showing you smiling with intelligence in front of climate graphs or a whiteboard full of teaching notes. Have these put up on the University web site, especially in your faculty and personal page, with a ‘free use’ copyright notices.

    The Press Office should/could use them next time it sends out a press release about your work, thus ensuring that they are in the newspapers photo archives.

  40. David Springer

    Better picture. Short hair is more becoming IMO. I bet she could turn some heads with makeup and a slinky dress. :-)

    http://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/images/content/144757main_rn_curryflyer250.jpg

  41. A relevant tweet:

    @MichaelEMann UK Met Office debunks latest Judy Curry/David Rose #climatechange #disinformation tag team effort: http://t.co/zkYtwOLF
    12:42 PM Oct 14th from web

  42. That the 17-, 18-, 19-, … 30-year etc trends are up, does not alter the fact that the 16-trend is flat. Simple fact, not spin,

    The real question is : how many years of non-increase is significant? 20? 30? …

    • Particular Physicist

      > how many years of non-increase is significant?

      10 more than however many there were at the time of asking.

  43. A fan of *MORE* discourse

    Latimer Alder asserts  “Realists look at what real measurements tell us about actually happens in the world. This used to be called ‘the scientific method.’”

    Your assertion is wrong-on-the-facts Latimer Alder!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

    Science and engineering (S&E) nowadays rests upon  three  four mutually-supporting pillars:

    •  physical theory, and
    •  computational simulation, and
    •  experimental test, and
    •  observation of nature.

    In practice, the S&E community arrives at consensus when all four pillars strongly support the same conclusion. In particular, the reality of AGW is strongly supported by all four pillars … hence the modern consensus that “AGW is real.

    In contrast, AGW denialism rests upon *NO* rational pillars at all:

    •   physical theory  is *DENIED*, and
    •   computational simulation  is *DENIED*, and
    •   experimental test  is *DENIED*, and
    •   observation of nature  is *CHERRY-PICKED* to serve ideology.

    Whenever denialist cognition combines with short-sighted neoconservative market fundamentalism, the resulting toxic belief syndrome is called neodenialism.

    Summary  Neodenialist belief systems vehemently reject all four pillars of modern science.   :shock:   :roll:   :shock:

    Yah see Latimer Alder (and Bob Tisdale, Jim Cripwell, Dave Springer, Peter Lang, et al)? It’s not complicated!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

    • Latimer Alder

      @AFOTBS

      I tried to make some sense of what you are saying, but as usual it was really just like paint thown at a wall. Those who want to see something profound can probably do so.. but to the rest of us it’s just a confused mess.

      But three things puzzle me:

      1. What in general terms am I supposed to be ‘denying’? And what is your evidence that I am ‘denying’ it?
      2. What specific ‘experimental tests’ am I supposed to be ‘denying’? And what is your evidence that I am ‘denying’ it?
      3. What was the purpose of the link to an interview in an American magazine I have never heard of with somebody I have never heard of?

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        Latimer Alder asks  “What was the purpose of the link to an interview in an American magazine I have never heard of”

        LOL … Latimer Alder, it is surprising that you are unaware that your opionions posted here on Climate Etc are uniformly consonant with the Lyndon LaRouche ideology!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

        Better perhaps would have been a link to Chris Monckton’s interview with the LaRouchites … but that interview has been “disappeared”.   :roll:   :roll:   :roll:

        Fortunately, the Aussies have retained a PDF of Monckton’s nutty interview with the LaRouchites.

        Summary  To predict what Latimer Alder, Peter Lang, Anthony Watts, and Chris Monckton will post tomorrow about climate-change, study what Lyndon LaRouche is posting today!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

        Neodenialist climate-change cognition is a fascinating topic, eh Latimer Alder?   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • @AFOTBS

        Who the f..k is Lyndon LaRouche?

      • @AFOTBS

        You have failed to answer my first two questions.

        Here’s a reminder

        1. What in general terms am I supposed to be ‘denying’? And what is your evidence that I am ‘denying’ it?
        2. What specific ‘experimental tests’ am I supposed to be ‘denying’? And what is your evidence that I am ‘denying’ it?

        Look forward to your detailed and substantiated answers.

      • Fan,

        You might notice that Soclates can’t even figure out that your quote of him might provide evidence for what he’s asking:

        > Realists look at what real measurements tell us about actually happens in the world. This used to be called ‘the scientific method.

        This editorial comment denies actual but yet unnamed scientists of using the scientific method.

        This editorial comment deniers these handwaved scientists to use real measurements.

        VeryTall might be happy to notice that this editorial comment presumes his favorite: Soclates’ empiricism.

        Real data, real theories.

        Real men.

        Real men like Soclates can’t get no satisfaction:

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/33362796798

      • @willard

        More gibberish from you. The virus has got you bad.

      • Dear Soclates,

        If you find one I’ve written that doesn’t make my point clearly and directly, please point it out and I’ll be happy to clarify for you and/or rewrite if needed.

      • @willard

        You’re going to be in for a lot of rewriting, mon brave.

        Let’s start with this one.

        http://judithcurry.com/2012/10/13/week-in-review-101312/#comment-254752

        Was there a point? If so what was it? Why did you not simply state it rather than set the readers off onto a chase round the blogosphere?

        Please rewrite the post clearly and directly – as you have promised.

        More later after supper.

      • @willard

        This one could do with starting again I think

        http://judithcurry.com/2012/10/08/whats-the-best-climate-question-to-debate/#comment-252407

        Remember…clear and direct

        Example

        ‘The cat sat on the mat’.

        Simples!

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        Latimer Alder  “Who the f..k is Lyndon LaRouche?”

        LOL  it’s simple Latimer Alder!

        •  Lyndon LaRouche is America’s version of Chris Monckton!

        •  Chris Monckton is Latimer Alder from a parallel universe!

          :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • Dear Soclates,

        The point of the first comment you wish being explained is this: I was reporting that the Auditor believes that there is a consensus (!) since at least Lamb that we live in times we could qualify as “unprecedented”.

        Don’t you find this flabbergasting, Soclates?

        ***

        Was this point that tough to grasp, Andrew Adams?

        ***

        The second comment’s quite obvious enough as it is. Perhaps we ought to ask Andrew Adams or Joshua what they take from it. In any case, for the sake of reciprocity, I’ll wait till you answer my question I asked you twice:

        Do you think that H2O is by itself wet?

        Besides, I’ve already underlined two sentences from you on this very thread that were neither clear, nor direct.

      • Steven Mosher

        fan.

        “1. What in general terms am I supposed to be ‘denying’? And what is your evidence that I am ‘denying’ it?”

        I am sorry, insistence I do not see where you have answered these questions in a direct straightforward way.

        For your benefit I will supply my criteria for direct and straightforward.

        A) A list of what he is denying would be direct and straightforward.
        B) pointing to what others say is neither direct nor straight forward by this definition.

        Second. he asked for evidence that he is denying it. I take the charitable assumption that he means what he says and he is looking for evidence.
        In this regard I would count quotes by him as evidence.

        You are free to argue with this account of what it means to be direct and straightforward and divert the dialogue.

      • Steven Mosher

        Huh Fan?

        I read the interview. What in gods name are you talking about?
        Wait Here are some things that clarify Monkton’s position.

        http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA282890

        topic WLA 93

      • A fan of *MORE* discourse

        Steven Mosher posts  Here are some things that clarify Monkton’s position.

        LOL … the above link points to a video that really clarifies “Monckton’s position”, not only with regard Monckton’s denialist views regarding climate change, but also Monckton’s startling claims to cure disease!   :wink:   :smile:   :grin:   :lol:   :!:

      • Steven Mosher

        What in general terms am I supposed to be ‘denying’?

        You’re denying that you’re denying.

        Or, at least, you’re denying that fan is correct in saying that you’re denying.

        And I agree with you.

        But I’m not denying that I said I thought you were denying that fan is correct in saying that you’re denying.

        [Where are the smileys?]

        Max

      • Mosher,

        It did not take me long to conclude that discourse with fan is a waste of time. He never directly answers questions, he offers opinions on topics he clearly is not knowledgeable about, he almost always posts links that appear to have little to do with either the topic of discussion or even the point he is trying to make (which leads me to believe he isn’t trying to make one, just trying to exhibit how clever he is to the rest of us less enlightened types) and uses emoticons at a rate which gives one reason to believe he gets a royalty or possess the mindset of a 14 year old girl in the body of a middle aged man.

        I can respect someone like lolwot, because he at least is serious. fan does little for us to conclude he is serious in the least. I have no respect for the crap he usually posts.

  44. David Springer

    The graph of the last 15 years (180 months) exactly.

    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:180/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:180/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/last:180/trend/detrend:0.048

    This is using the correct database (HadCrut4gl) and exactly 15 years as the article describes.

    The trend is a positive 0.032C/decade. What qualifies as a “significant” trend is a matter of opinion I guess but 0.3C/century probably doesn’t make the cut for “significant” in very many opinions.

    • The headline says 16 years

      • David Springer

        As the article states Phil Jones in 2009 said ‘Bottom line: the “no upward trend” has to continue for a total of 15 years before we get worried.’

        So I graphed exactly the last 15 years. Don’t shoot the messenger.

        Now I’d like to know what I’m supposed to be worried about. I should think no global warming for 15 years should be something to be happy about. That Phil would worry about global warming stopping speaks volumes about his real concern i.e. he doesn’t give a flying f*ck about the globe actually warming he only cares about the fear it can drum up to push the green agenda forward.

        Don’t be a schmuck. Wake the f*ck up.

  45. Physical theory is “denied” because it’s not been borne by the real world, Joy. You act as if this theory were somehow written on stone tablets and then delivered down from the mountain top.

  46. Computational simulation, Fan…’simulation’ a foxy word, means ‘feign, ‘pretend to be’, ‘act like.’

    Climate models used by the IPCC aren’t able ter simulate the coupled ocean /atmosphere processes involved in El Nino and La Nina events. Bob Tisdale points out that the models ‘cannot match the sea surface records that show how often and how strongly ENSO events have
    occurred since 1900.’ *

    *Bob Tisdale Who Turned On the Heat.’
    You should read his book, fan.

  47. What I find most amazing about climatologists, and even more so about climate bloggers is how certain they are about everything. Yet, there are so many polarized conclusions at the far ends of the spectrum that one must wonder how they can all think they have the answer. There is a tremendous amount of ego expressed in this blog. Too many assertions. Quite a lot of put-downs. Why be nasty? And woe to anyone who admits he or she doesn’t understand. It seems to me that a little humility in this field would go a long way. A lot of humility would be even better. I have been studying climate change intensely for the past eight years, reading many hundreds of published papers and correlating and coordinating information, and I have reached the conclusion that in regard to the basics, we still don’t know what is going on. There are too many contradictory factors. Our attitude ought to be: “let’s study this thing together and try to understand it a little better” rather than two sentences that claim “I know it all and you’re a dope”.
    As to the picture, it was awful. Judith should post a better one. I agree with the guy who said: “I bet she could turn some heads with makeup and a slinky dress.”

    • Donald, I once posted as “A fan of *MORE* civilised discourse,” didn’t have much effect. I’m also a fan of humility – hey, no one is more humble than me!

      And I’m a fan of not commenting on personal appearance, good, bad or indifferent.

  48. Nature’s beauty is universal:
    ________________________

    http://i46.tinypic.com/303ipeo.png
    +
    http://i49.tinypic.com/wwdwy8.png
    =
    http://i48.tinypic.com/2v14sc5.gif
    (slow animation of preceding pair)

  49. A group of alarmists and skeptics are sitting round a table arguing in 1998. In front of them is the surface temperature data since 1980. The temperature trend from 1980 to September 1997 is 0.012C/year, 0.21C warming in total. The alarmists predict this warming will continue over the next 15 years (to August 2012). The skeptics disagree and say the warming will stop after 1997.

    The Alarmist Prediction: 0.44C warming from 1980-2012
    The alarmists expect the warming to continue over the next 15 years, so they predict a continuation of the 1980-1997 trend, which will result in a total warming of 0.44C from 1980-2012.

    The Skeptic Prediction: 0.21C warming from 1980-2012
    The skeptics think the warming will stop after 1997 so think the total warming from 1980-2012 will be the same as it already is from 1980-1997. So they expect 0.21C warming from 1980-2012.

    2012: The results are in

    0.52C warming from 1980-2012.

    Who was more correct, the alarmists who predicted only 0.44C warming, or the skeptics who predicted just 0.21C? How can people seriously consider the idea from the Daily Mail that warming has stopped since 1997?

    • David Springer

      lolwot | October 15, 2012 at 9:36 am | Reply

      “The skeptics disagree and say the warming will stop after 1997.”

      Linky?

      • David Springer

        I ask for a link because those skeptics were very near correct as shown by the corrected graph (you failed to break out the after-1997 trend) and I want to know who they are. They would be the GO TO guys about what’s going to happen next. Never argue with success. ;-)

        http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1980/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1980/to:1997.7/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1980/to:1997.7/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997.7/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997.7/trend/detrend:0.048/plot/none

      • your graph is wrong. Your lines don’t extrapolate the 1980-1997 warming.

        Here I’ve done it for you

        The warming well matches a continuation of the 1980-1997 warming.

        And here is the skeptic* prediction

        Which one fits the data best? A continuation of the 1980-1997 warming, or an end to warming in 1997?

        *hypothetical skeptics. In reality climate skeptics were busy denying the 1980-1997 warming in 1998. It wasn’t until years later they were forced to accept the world had warmed.

      • David Springer

        No no. My graph matched the ostensible claim (still waiting for you to tell me which skeptic(s) made the claim) that warming would stop in 1997. If we pretend that the world didn’t exist prior to 1997 and graph what global temperature did just since that time then these skeptics were pretty much spot on. Maybe you just misunderstand the claim, God knows you misunderstand just about everything else…

      • “(still waiting for you to tell me which skeptic(s) made the claim”

        are you kidding? The daily mail article which is the subject of this very thread makes the claim. Also every time a skeptic claims there’s been now warming since 1997 they make the claim.

        It’s simple: if there’s been no warming since 1997 then all the warming since 1980 should have happened from 1980-1997. But it didn’t. In fact most of the 1980-present warming happened since 1997.

    • so that is half the rate of per decade warming required to hit 2C by 2050..

    • Climate Weenie

      “0.52C warming from 1980-2012.”

      1.56 C per century
      – lower than Hansen Scenario C
      – lower than the IPCC4 best estimate for the ‘Low Scenario’

      Chalk one up for the luke warmers.

      • actually it’s slightly higher than scenario C. Implies a lukewarming (?!) climate sensitivity of about 3C per doubling of CO2..

      • Climate Weenie

        Since 1979, less than Scenario C, and declining.

        Yes, luke warming. RSS is at 1.3 C per century.

        The lowest limit of ‘possible’ IPCC trends is 1.1 C per century.

        There is warming, just not a lot.

    • Now we’re going to disguise our cherry picking as hypotheticals?

      It seems the climate cognoscenti are no better at logic than they are at statistics.

      Besides, I thought the party line was that CAGWers don’t make predictions?

      lolwot, you keep using words like “catastrophe” and “prediction,” and they’re going to come and take your decoder ring away.

  50. doctorbunsenhoneydew

    “The data confirms the existence of a ‘pause’ in the warming.”

    Statistically speaking, such a claim should only be made if there were sufficient evidence to reject the null hypothesis of warming having continued at the previous rate. In statistics the null hypothesis is that which you want to disprove, so if you want to show there has been a pause, you need to show that it is sufficiently unlikely that the observations could arise as being the result of random variation superimposed on a continuing warming trend. This concept of assuming that you are wrong (i.e. being required to show that the alternative explanation is implausible) is an important safety valve to stop scientists making claims that are not supported by the evidence.

    I have yet to see a climate skeptic demonstrate statistical significance for this assertion. I would be very grateful if Prof. Curry could provide one.

    • Why? When a statistically significant trend is proven is typical at the change point into a different trend. Kinda like closing the barn after you lost the live stock.

      The greatest system inertia is the most likely predictor of future trends which is really the name of the game.
      http://redneckphysics.blogspot.com/2012/10/how-would-you-predict-future.html

      Now that inertial Judas goat has proven past predictive ability that would indicate it could also have future predictive ability with in reason. The trend of the predictor in this case is ~33 years and its fluctuation, annual and inter-annual, is small in comparison to the other data of similar length.

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        why? becuase when a scientist says that the data confirms something, then that ought to mean that the evidence for that assertion is strong enough that it should at least pass an appropriate test for statistical significance. If not, it is opinion, rather than science, and should be presented as such.

      • Then you obviously miss the point. Statistical significance is often a forensic statistic, “the trend died, Jim”. So determining a trend of 0 +/- 0.2 in noise of +/- 1.0 can only be done after the fact. That cuts both ways as Judith noted.

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        No, if you make a cliam, the onus is on you to establish statistical significance. Science has been that way for a long time, and experience has shown it to be an effective way of doing things.

    • dr b
      We know that there has been a pause in warming, because the thermometers have stopped going up. Boring, I know. Quite possibly because natural variations have swamped the CO2 effect of the IPCC gospel, hard to tell in time slices if less that 30 years. But then no claims have been made to the contrary about that, so don’t quite see your concern.

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        If I roll a die six times and roll 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, does that mean my die has mysteriously gone from being biased high to biased low, or is it just a statistical fluke? Probably the latter. The point of statistical significance tests is to help guard against mistaking a statistical fluke for a meaningful event. In the case of temperatures, temperatures can stop going up without that meaning that warming has stopped, simply because the thermometers only measure the temperature of the surface and not e.g. deep ocean temperatures. Much of the variability in temperatures is due to things like ENSO which redistribute heat between the atmosphere and oceans. This means if you cherry pick a start date which commences at a very strong El-Nino, it isn’t difficult to engineer an apparemnt pause. You would be fooling yourself if you thought it meant anything though.

      • Kinda like picking a period of say 1950 to 2005 out of a 150 year record which likely 25% of is unreliable and proclaiming that 0.8 is a statistically significant trend after smoothing the data to remove most of the signal?

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        Sorry capt, but if the evidence for a claim doesn’t pass the significance test, you shouldn’t make it. End of story. If it does pass, that doesn’t mean that it is necessarily true, just that there is reasonable support from the data to justify making the claim, and you can argue what it means.

        The bottom line is that if Prof. Curry wants to assert that there has been a pause, the onus is on her to demonstrate that the claim at least passes the sanity check of a statistical significance test.

      • “Sorry capt, but if the evidence for a claim doesn’t pass the significance test, you shouldn’t make it. End of story.” Agreed :)

        Kinda like climate models, huh?

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        sorry life is to short. The observations are consistent with the models,

        http://www.realclimate.org/index.php/archives/2012/02/2011-updates-to-model-data-comparisons/

        When this is no longer the case let me know. There is one area where the models are definitely falsified by the observations though, which is that Arctic sea ice is dissapearing *faster* than the models can explain. Ironic really.

      • OK, so a 16-year hiatus in warming is consistent with the models.
        Is there a limit to this period though – and if so what is it ? – or is there no period of divergence at all that can falsify them?

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        Erica, yes, the models are *currently* consistent with the data, but if the “pause” continues, eventually the models will fail the test of consistency. IIRC this problem was addressed by a paper by Santer, which said that *at least* 17 years of data would be required in order to expect the models to fail the test if they were wrong. However, that assumes that the start date is randomly chosen (rather than cherry picked in hindsight). Sorry to have the caveats, but that is due to the way frequentist statistics works.

        The best test is to see if the observations lie outside the 95% spread of the model runs. If they are inside, the model and obs are consistent, if outside they are not. You can judge from the figure in the realclimate article what sort of observations you would need for that to happen, and it isn’t that long.

        I should however point out that the observations were closer to the upper error bar of the models in 1998, but would skeptics be happy to use that as evidence (at the time) that the models were too conservative? I suspect not, in which case it is somewhat hypocritical to make quite so much fuss about the current ‘pause’.

        The bottom line is that you only make a claim when the evidence on which you base the claim passes a test of statistical signficance, where the null hypothesis is the thing you want to disprove. This is scientific practice 101 and the climate debate would be more productive if it were followed more rigorously.

      • Okay,
        http://rankexploits.com/musings/2012/arima11-test-reject-ar4-multi-model-mean-since-1980-1995-200120012003/

        It appears the fatal flaw is inability to anticipate natural variability.

        http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/bibliography/related_files/jrt9502.pdf Seems the redhaired stepchild of climate science, the ACC, shouldn’t be neglected. An ~150 year diffusion rate might cause a little internal oscillation in a climate system.

        considering that, http://redneckphysics.blogspot.com/2012/10/how-would-you-predict-future.html

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        The confidence of the model mean is not the same thing as the spread of the model runs, which is the correct test for consistency of the models.

        However this is just a rhetorical exercise on your part to evade the key point which is that the evidence for Prof. Curry’s assertion doesn’t pass the test for statistical significance.

      • I believe you are now splitting hairs.
        “The flawed assumption behind the orthodoxy was that natural variability is merely ‘noise’ superimposed on the long term trend. The natural variability has been shown over the past two decades to have a magnitude that dominates the greenhouse warming signal. It is becoming increasingly apparent that our attribution of warming since 1980 and future projections of climate change needs to consider natural internal variability as a factor of fundamental importance. ”

        The 44-64S trend is primarily natural variability and has a statistically significant impact on climate. With now known long term variability, the cherry pick of 1950 to present is about the same as the cherry pick of the article, poor science.

      • doctorbunsenhoneydew

        Again you are trying to evade the point that Prof Curry has made a claim for which the evidence is not statistically significant. It is a pity that so many discussions about climate are spoiled by such rhetorcial devices. Sorry, as I said life is too short to indulge such behaviour.

      • No, I am agreeing with Dr. Curry that natural variability is statistically significant. You seem to think it is a “Claim” when it appears to be a reality.

        Then you probably think that Trenberth screwing the Energy budget by 20 Wm-2 was not statistically significant because it doesn’t impact your flawed logic or that Trenberth’s estimate of 0.9Wm-2 imbalance with +/- 0.18 magrin of error was a valid statistic.

        It is hard to see the obvious when your mind is cluttered with invalid confidence intervals.

      • Dr BHD, I don’t mind using such an ensembly as long as you realize that it indicates that I can use about 0.3C/century estimate for the dates shown. This does not change any of the underlying math, nor probabilities, but does indicate why persons noticing this would wonder why use all the runs of the models that were kept and made it versus what the IPCC wrote up and how they wrote it up.

      • OK, so a 16-year hiatus in warming is consistent with the models.
        Erica, yes, the models are *currently* consistent with the data,

        That is total BS

  51. technical comments

    Hadcrut4, methodologically speaking, is the worst method of the lot
    so i would not take its results seriously unless I compared them with more standard methods ( ie kriging )

    • Steven,

      Several things surprised me a little with the BEST application of kriging. And now you’ve mentioned the topic again. So this is a good time to throw out a couple of comments/questions.

      Certainly one of the notable pluses of kriging is that it provides local estimates of spatial error. Yet a different approach was taken. Not calculating error maps when kriging in these circumstances–global and spatial temperature estimation–seems strange; though optional it seems a natural for this problem. Is there a technical story behind this or perhaps a simple matter of priorities given the magnitude of the overall BEST implementation task? Perhaps a practical decision to go with the isotropic correlation was the basis for not undertaking error maps which might be sensitive to anisotropy? Curious about thinking involved.

      Were clustering effects looked at to any extent? While kriging itself does in part handle clustering, e.g., see Mo and Ed, variograms (or correlation functions) may be very sensitive to clustering in the data. And the variogram/correlation function is used in the kriging portion. Again, just curious.

      Anisotropy in the correlation function (correlogram?) was not incorporated in the calculations in the current calculations, although that prospect was not ruled out for future calculations. Has the view of incorporating anisotropy evolved any in recent time?

      The mathematical supplement is still very much an overview document. Will there eventually be more detailed documentation on the implementation as a part of the record? verification and validation package?

      A cursory examination (less than a couple of hours) of the US info in site_detail.txt revealed a small number of low-hanging fruit ‘errors’ in the file suggesting little actual QA of the data has taken placed. The problem with the errors [appearing to be things like run-of-the-mill original in source, data entry, cut and paste, etc.] is not that a single digit anywhere in your calculations will change, but that the data appear to have been accepted and processed with little review–an all too common fact of life. Looking down the road, I suspect you folks need to address QA formally at some point–the level to be determined by the degree of acceptance you hope to achieve.

      I have to add that after the cursory examination of a small portion of the data, reflecting how to process that much data, thinking of things like variography anisotropy, and kriging in on the surface of the globe,etc., … and using interpreted code? … well you folks are gluttons for punishment. It was a lot to take on.

  52. “Some ['deeply flawed'] climate scientists, such as Professor ['deeply flawed'] Phil Jones, director of the ['deeply flawed'] Climatic Research Unit at the ['deeply flawed'] University of East Anglia, last week dismissed the significance of the plateau, saying that 15 or 16 years is too short a period from which to draw ['deeply flawed'] conclusions.”

  53. Heinrich the Nowegian Elkhound

    I must add my voice to the chorus of ‘skeptics’ with regards to the picture.

    Say whatever you will about the planetary climate, Dr Curry – That picture is AWFUL.

    And I am so sorry to learn that,
    “That photo is Joe Romm’s favorite, he uses it when he is trying to discredit me in some way.”

    On the other hand,
    “I bet she could turn some heads with makeup and a slinky dress.”
    certainly bring the focus back onto your scientific credentials.

    Everyone should know by now – If you really want to focus on the integrity of science, you need to do up a tee-shirt.

    Beer optional.

  54. In 1929 another bunch of folks (also based in Atlanta, Judith) came up with

    “THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES”

    to market their Coca-cola product.

    Is this current “pause” in global warming

    “THE PAUSE THAT REFOCUSES”?

    Max

  55. Knowing as much as we do about the UHI effect, GCMs are Climatology’s version of Hubble’s bad mirror. Because of the entrenched failure of vested interests in politico-academia to admit that the data is corrupted, admit the plateau and admit to the historical record of climate change over the last 10,000 years shows that Climatogy is to science as Scientology is to religion.

    • Marvelous metaphor. Have we the space ship to reach the stricken experiment? Cap’n Stormfield’s for hire, I hear, and what a guide!
      ===========

      • Thanks but I do fear we’ve got pilots like Cap’n Charlie Allnutat the wheel awho already know the truth and don’t give two schitts an a VP that Clint Eastwood likens to “a smile with a body behind it.”

        GCMs that former VP Al Gore plays with and contort into gross postures like plastic dolls have been fabricated by government-funded scientists to justify fears of runaway global warming and disastrous climate change.

        The concept of an average global temperature is itself not any different than the built-in fundamental flaws of the Hubble Space Telescope’s bad mirror.

  56. The ‘pause’ plainly says climate models are presently inadequate on decade plus time scales.
    But additional analysis is needed to say (1) why, (2) what difference does it make to equilibrium climate sensitivity, and (3) what difference does that difference make to policy? Dr. Curry is raising such questions on this site. It would be more useful to think about them and attempt to address them factually than to attack one another personally over minutia.
    My own answers are: (1) (a)natural variability is underappreciated, certainly ocean oscillations over the past half century, plus solar variability before then, (b) GCM positive humidity feedback is overstated because UTrH is declining rather than constant and UTsH is overestimated by 6-10%, both perhaps because precipitation, especially intense tropical precipitation, is understated; (2) ECS is more likely 1.9 (range 1.5-2.1) than 3, so future AGW is overstated significantly [four different approaches to showing that]; (3) since CO2 comes from fossil fuels, looking at fuel availability and possible needs for future fuel conservation to support GDP and population gives other motives (and other solutions) than AGW for advisable directional economic and societal policy. That is why Dr. Curry invited Dr. Rutledge from CalTech to give a talk at GT.
    CO2 is a green house gas. Tyndall showed that in 1859. The questions are not whether it can cause warming, but rather how much and so what. Those questions can be tackled using critical thinking and a little bit of effort to educate oneself about simple basic facts.

    • “CO2 is a green house gas. Tyndall showed that in 1859. The questions are not whether it can cause warming, but rather how much and so what. Those questions can be tackled using critical thinking and a little bit of effort to educate oneself about simple basic facts.”

      I wonder how long it will take to let go of this one. At least, some warmists are realizing that CO2 is not the knob and can be easily overwhelmed. Next step: to question whether CO2 can cause warming. Then, science can move on.

    • David Springer

      The greater question appears to be if natural cooling mechanisms like what froze Europe and North America a few hundred years ago is waiting in the wings to freeze our dumb asses again and whether our CO2 emissions can make it potentially less catastrophic if and when it happens again. And it happened last when the sun was very very quiet. Quiet just like the sun has become in the past decade. Scary quiet. Like the eye of storm. An ice storm that is for the northern hemisphere. Watch the beloved-by-the-warmists precautionary principle fly out the window when it’s ice knocking at the climatology door.

  57. It is correct that the “pause” is evidence that the models are not suited for making projections over a decade or more.

    It is also clear that this raises serious questions about uncertainties regarding attribution, which should be answered before any further model-based projections are published by IPCC

    But, away from the science itself:

    I hear a sound…

    Is it the sound of “tables being turned”?

    Or is it the sound of “goalposts being moved?”

    Max

  58. Reblogged this on evilincandescentbulb and commented:
    Knowing as much as we now do about the corruption resulting from UHI effects, General Circulation Models fabricated by government-funded scientists to justify fears of runaway global warming and disastrous climate change are Climatology’s version of the built-in fundamental flaws of the Hubble Space Telescope’s bad mirror.

  59. Pic be damned! JC’s been hanging on to the idea of science being what science should be for something like 10 years during a time when her field was substituting consensus for observation and doctrine for science. Given this article and the growing crescendo of “The emperor is NAKED” it may be approaching time for a bottle of decent Scotch.

    There’s another historical signal that’s been missed in this debate. It’s the sin wave of people championing a “belief” in the absence or even contradiction of observational support. The curve of the idea rises steadily until the weight of it’s inherent fallacy begins to overtake it’s enthusiastic inertia. It subsequently falls and falls hard taking people and reputations with it.

    It is very rare that an entire iteration of this curve would exist in a lifetime. It’s a wonderful thing to see.

    • I agree with this. I’ve been saying for a long time that CAGW will keep the social scientists (most of whom have drunk the kool-aid themselves) busy for years. In my view, CAGW will be to future generations as the Salem witch trials are to ours. Our grandchildren will be shaking their heads in disbelief.

      • Heinrich the Norwegian Elkhound


        Our grandchildren will be shaking their heads in disbelief.

        Yes – but not for the reasons you think.


        In my view, CAGW will be to future generations as the Salem witch trials are to ours.

        Funny you should say that. Have you ‘skeptics’ finished burning Phil Jones at the stake yet? How goes the Michael Mann torturing? Did he confess?

      • Hey crusher crew!

        Show a little responsibility as pet owners, will yah? I mean, like, what are you thinking when you “unleash” your “Hiveprick the Nerdvegan” flea-bag to run loose in this blogospheric neighborhood making “messes” on whatever front-lawns his mutt-butt happens to wander?

        Probably you “crusher crew” wankers think ol’ “Hiveprick” is a problem for us “little guys”. You know, like how you big, important, scare-mongering, hive-bozo smarty-pants are just way too busy trying to resuscitate your brain-dead, flat-lined CAGW scam to bother yourselves with a mere peasant expectation that you keep your mangy beast on a leash and pick-up all his “crapola”, yourselves, with your own pooper-scooper.

        Typical greenshirt sense of self-importance, entitlement, and privileged exemption from the rules everyone else is expected to follow.

        And, oh by the way, why don’t you eco-flakes just let your little CAGW con die a dignified death, for Pete’s sake? I mean, like, if nothing else, the clownish extremities of your last-stand defense of your CAGW hustle only sensitizes us helots to your “guerilla war” duplicities and makes your next big rip-off that much harder to pull-off.

        Regardless, pick up “Hiveprick’s” doo-doo yourself. O. K.?

      • David Springer

        Damn. I can’t believe someone beat me to the pooper scooper joke genre…

      • mike,

        better to ignore the guy than resort to uncivil name calling. That’s one of WEB’s tactics.

    • I agree, jbmckim, Pic be damned ! JC’s been hanging on to the idea of science being what science should be for something like 10 years during a time when her field was substituting consensus for observation and doctrine for science.”

      Her contributions to climatology are like Mozart’s to music !

      Talents bestowed by a divine Force to battle the Ego

      See: http://omanuel.wordpress.com/about/#comment-1292
      And: http://omanuel.wordpress.com/about/#comment-1369

    • Heinrich the Norwegian Elkhound

      jbmckim:

      It’s a wonderful thing to see.

      That’s for sure!
      I look forward to the day when important scientists from all over the internet run blogs just like Dr Curry’s.

      Think of it:
      We can call the results of all research that produces anything of significance “consensus”, and the convergence of expert opinion on any topic “doctrine”.

      There will be naked emperors EVERYWHERE you look!

      BTW – There is never a bad time for bottle of decent scotch…

      • I have this theory about evaluating people based on whether or not you would have a drink with the person and not whether or not you agree with their opinions.

  60. Pingback: A 16 Year Pause In Global Warming? - Hit & Run : Reason.com

  61. Pingback: Still good news: global temperatures remain stable, at least for now. « Fabius Maximus

  62. The scientific community would come down on me in no uncertain terms if I said the world had cooled from 1998. OK it has but it is only 7 years of data and it isn’t statistically significant.

    http://bit.ly/XdYbgB

    Now it is double of the 7 years with little warming. Is 14 years still not significant?

    if the sulfate hypothesis is right, then your prediction of warming might end up being wrong. I think we have been too readily explaining the slow changes over past decade as a result of variability–that explanation is wearing thin. I would just suggest, as a backup to your prediction, that you also do some checking on the sulfate issue, just so you might have a quantified explanation in case the prediction is wrong.

    Otherwise, the Skeptics will be all over us–the world is really cooling, the models are no good, etc. And all this just as the US is about ready to get serious on the issue. We all, and you all in particular, need to be prepared.

    http://bit.ly/V25i8S

  63. I read the article and then went to review the data (http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcrut4/data/current/download.html) to try to understand some of the discussion. The article’s title seems to indicate that there was a report that was “quietly released” and maybe I missed it but I just see the data. The discussions about the data don’t seem to contradict the major conclusions of the IPCC or the other studies done by MET (that supports IPCC findings). The article generally wasn’t useful.

    Climate change is such a complex and interesting topic the pure science is mind numbing and once you add the political, social and economic aspect of it, it becomes hard to reach conclusions that can be translated into action for the benefit of humanity.

    So basically what I gather from this blog is that the time frame indicated by the article is not enough to make the statement “global warming stopped 16 years ago”.

  64. The New Millennium “Pause” (i.e slight cooling)

    Out of five global temperature records, three show global cooling since the start of the new millennium (January 1, 2001)
    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:2001/trend/plot/gistemp/from:2001/trend/plot/hadcrut3vgl/from:2001/trend/plot/rss/from:2001/trend/plot/uah/from:2001/trend

    -0.03C/decade (HadCRUT4)
    -0.07C/decade (HadCRUT3)
    -0.05C/decade (RSS)

    One shows no change:

    0.00/decade (GISS)

    And one shows a warming trend:

    +0.06C/decade (UAH)

    If we simply take the average, this was cooling of -0.018C/decade.

    We saw CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa go up from 370 to 392 ppmv, which should have caused temperature to rise from the GH effect by +0.27C over the period (using the mean value of IPCC 2xCO2 CS = 3.2C and the logarithmic function.

    This equals an expected theoretical warming rate of around +0.2C/decade (as IPCC also projected in AR4).

    What happened?

    Max

    • Climate change happened, the real climate change, not the Orwellian one.

      • Yes, that’s where we’re heading.

      • When temperature goes up, people say it is worse.
        When temperature goes down, people say it is worse.

        Dr. Phil Jones thinks it is a disaster that we don’t have a disaster.
        I guess he sees that without a disaster, the money will diminish.

      • Yes, Trenberth is already complaining that climategate caused a loss of funding.

      • Ol’ “Hiveprick” is
        My elk-hound name
        And carbon-cons
        My flea-bag game

        And little me
        Is mascot to
        The geeks assigned
        The “crusher crew”

        A one-trick schtick
        Earns me my chow
        That’s on command
        Go all bow-wow

        But mine is not
        Your normal bark
        But rather more
        A brain-dead snark:

        A carbon tax
        Or you’ll all die!
        Fork over now
        Or your kids fry!

        And then I’ll throw
        Into the mix–
        The whiteboys got
        Us in this fix!

        And if the rubes
        Suspicions nurse,
        I’ll goose ‘em with–
        It’s gotten worse!

        Of course, I know
        It’s all flim-flam
        But hey! My chow
        Rides on this scam

      • Poor ol’ Nor Dog
        The dog what had four eyes.
        Two eyes before
        Two eyes look aft.
        One day two rabbits
        Jumped and laughed,
        One in front,
        One abaft.
        Poor ol’ pooch,
        Tore after each.
        ==============

      • ok,

        this is pretty funny.

      • Mike’s is funny, mine’s just sad.
        ============

      • It was mike’s ditty I was referring to.

        I’m guessing the sadness of yours has something to do with the subject matter.

        Personally, I like dogs. Even though they sometimes crap on the carpet and chew up stuff.

      • Hound dog

        If’n Ah wuz U, away up yonder in No-way, Ah’d be skeered lookin’ at them g’raffs too.

        Max

      • Now that is just silly!

    • 0.02C cooling from 2001 to 2012 is tiny.

      Considering the start of the period was elevated by a run of El Ninos and the end was suppressed by a run of La Ninas, that alone can explain it. Yet remember the period started with a solar maximum (~2003) and ended with long and deep solar minimum. In short we should have had more cooling from 2001-2012 than observed.

      Here are two possibilities, neither comforting to the staunch climate skeptic:

      a) The spotless deep and long solar minimum has had zero cooling effect.

      b) The spotless deep and long solar minimum has a strong cooling effect but the 24ppm CO2 rise over the period was strong enough to counter the potency of the solar minimum cooling.

      • Patience lolwot. You will see the cooling after ~2015.

      • what is that prediction based on?

      • Solar cycle frequency.

      • 11 years? Why didn’t the recent solar minimum cause any cooling?

      • It did. Wait and see what happens after the solar cycle 24 plateau.

      • Simples, really, lolwot. TSI varies only 0.5%, so your(our) recent solar minimum had minor, probably indistinguishable, effect. The real solar cause of major climate effect is…..well, come back after the pause that refreshes our sponsors, this story is breaking, but someone’s got to pay the bills.
        ================

      • “0.02C cooling from 2001 to 2012 is tiny.”

        Does anyone seriously believe we can determine global average temperature to within hundreths of a degree at any given time, let alone a trend with such precision over mutliple years?

        Anyone?

        I mean, I understand that the temperature series are the frame of reference for the debate. And I can understand why CAGW advocates would accept such statistics as meaningful without discussion.

        But skeptics too? et tu manacker? (And not just manacker, every other skeptic arguing about these numbers.)

        It is one thing to accept such numbers for the sake of argument, but I don’t see any qualifiers suggesting skepticism of the GAT figures themselves. Arguments about UHI, TOB, proximity to bodies of water, etc. all raise good questions about the accuracy of the published trends. But they take for granted, or at least do not dispute, the precision.

        Who here (among the skeptics) really thinks that we can determine the global average temperature (all levels of atmosphere, sea, and land combined) with anything remotely approaching such precision – today? How about 50, 100, or 1,000 years ago? And if you can’t, how the hell do you plot a graph showing a “pause,” let alone a trend showing a “drop” of tenths of degrees, over any period of time?

        A pause? Cooling since 1998? Color me skeptical that we know either way.

      • A vicious scrum has been holding temperature and discussion at midfield for most of this period.
        =============

      • lolwot

        Logically, there is a third possibility for the observed small cooling, when the climate models all projected strong warming, which you omitted:

        c)The GHG effect has been grossly overestimated by climate models

        N’est-ce pas? No es verdad?

        Max

  65. “The Daily Mail has actually altered the temperature values for September 1997 and August 2012 to fit their story. They are both depicted and drawn as being exactly 0.5C.”

    That is incorrect. The data on the graph starts in 10/1997 (0.553 C). The axes labels are incorrect, giving the impression that the data starts in 1/1997.

    But if you produce a graph of the data in excel and overlay it on the graph on the Daily Mail website the two overlap well.

    I would speculate that they made the graph originally starting in 1/97 and then cherry picked the start month, but forgot to fix the axis.

    • 0.553C is the second data point on the graph. The first is exactly on 0.5C, but HadCRUT 9/1997 was 0.475C not 0.5C

      • You can’t get from 0.475 to 0.553 without passing through 0.500. It’s “just” cherry picking.

      • 0.553C is the second data point on the graph. 0.5C is the first. There is no 0.475C plotted.

      • Take a piece of graph paper. Make a dot at .475. Make a dot at .553. Draw a line between them.

        Now take a straightedge and a razor and cut the paper from top to bottom, where the line crosses .50. Label the horizontal axis at the left edge of the paper as 9AM, October 20, 1997.

        It’s just a visual aid.

  66. MattStat/MatthewRMarler

    Dr Curry: And while I am griping, why did he have to use that photo that makes me look like a gorgon

    “Eye of the tiger”, Professor Curry. You look more like Gen. U.S. Grant surveying Confederate lines. (hm, in Georgia maybe that does strike you as Gorgon-like. How about Chris Evert returning serve.) I liked the photo immediately I saw it.

    This discussion will become more interesting if the “apparent non-warming” continues for 3 more years.

    Nothing important depends on the labeling of the horizontal and vertical axes. But while we are discussing red herrings, it would have been better if the plot line had been finer.

    • David Springer

      So you think comparing Curry to a fat, bearded, alcoholic civil war general is some kind of compliment? I bet you don’t get laid much.

      • Rofl.

      • We need her; she fights.
        =========

      • MattStat/MatthewRMarler

        David Springer: So you think comparing Curry to a fat, bearded, alcoholic civil war general is some kind of compliment?

        On rereading, I find that all I wrote was that she looked more like Grant than like a Gorgon, somewhat fainter praise than what I intended. Grant’s photo’s show an alert, steely-eyed grim determination. Probably I ought to have edited that out and gone with the Chris Evert comparison. As I wrote, I liked the picture of Dr. Curry the first I saw it. No on “Gorgon”, yes on “determination to succeed.”

      • Grant was not even close to being fat in the civil war time frame.

    • MattStat

      If you’re up-to-date on Civil War history, you’ll know that it wasn’t US General Grant the folks in Georgia remember with horror, it was General Sherman, who burned a corridor from Atlanta to Savannah.

      (Judith Curry is decidedly better-looking than either of them, even in a less-than-flattering photo.)

      But you’re right that it “will become more interesting if the apparent non-warming continues for 3 more years” (reaching Ben Santer’s 17-year time span required to be statistically significant).

      IF that happens (and that’s anyone’s guess) I predict that the 17-year goalpost will be moved.

      I also predict that not too many folks will be listening anymore.

      Max

      • ‘We dam’ near licked you. If I’d been feeling better we would of licked you’. Spoken by General U.S. Grant just as he surrendered his sword to General Lee @ Appomattox.

        H/t James T.
        =========

      • “Nev’ mind about me” said Grant, helping himself to a second, “I can take it or let it alone. Didn’ ya ever hear the story about the fella went to Lincoln to complain about me drinking too much? ‘So-and-So says Grant drinks too much,’ this fella said. ‘So-and-So is a fool,’ said Lincoln. So this fell went to What’s-His-Name and told him what Lincoln said and he came roarin’ to Lincoln about it. ‘Did you tell So-and-So I was a fool?’ he said. ”No,’said Lincoln, ‘I thought he knew it.’” The General smiled, reminiscently, and had another drink. “That’s how I stand with Lincoln,” he said, proudly.

        H/t JT.
        =====

  67. MattStat/MatthewRMarler

    I forgot to add. The photo of Dr. Curry compares favorably with the photo of Dr. Jones. Say you’re choosing up sides for volleyball or debate, whom would you choose? Dr Jones looks like he isn’t there.

  68. MattStat/MatthewRMarler

    The current “apparent non-warming” has lasted longer than the “apparent warming” had lasted when Hansen et al sounded their alarm, and the date of the beginning of the “apparent warming” had been cherry-picked ab initio. The problem is that it takes less information for humanity to sound an alarm than it does to reduce the alarm that has been created.

    • There’s been over 0.5C warming since 1980. Hard to pretend it hasn’t happened.

      • David Springer

        Yeah but most of it happened suddenly. The mother of all El Ninos in 1997/1998 made global temperature go up and it didn’t come back down. No one knows why. Models are worthless except to tell us it’t not in the model because they can’t duplicate ENSO or PDO with gradual accumulation of CO2. Smart people know that. Or at least they should with one quick glace at HadCrut4 global 1979-present.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Troposphere temperatures did come back down after 1998′s El Niño, but ocean heat content continued to accumulate. ENSO and the PDO do not create energy in the climate system.

      • R Gates,
        That’s an interesting hypothesis in your first sentence. If I can paraphrase; you seem to say that whilst the atmosphere was cooling, the higher thermal inertia oceans were warming. As an engineer familiar with heat transfer and stuff, I find this puzzling but am interested to learn. Is there any chance that you could elaborate please?

        Your second sentence; no probs.

      • Gatesy if ocean heat content continued to accumulate I think this means the oceans got warmer. Warmer oceans hold less CO2. CO2 released by oceans goes into the atmosphere – thats a bad thing because now it can heat the ocean that has just released it and then that loop just keeps on keeping on and we are all dead? Seriously, why have we never had a death spiral from warming oceans? It is acknowledged that CO2 lags warming by about 800 years. The historic increase has never led to re-warming. There is something wrong with the theory.

      • Dolphin, yes that “death spiral” was kind of my point earlier. How can a ONCE-OFF increase in air temp to where it has been for the last 16 years, have resulted in ONGOING ocean temp increases during that time?

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Bob Fernley-Jones,

        A greater amount of heat is released from the oceans on a global basis during El Ninos, and this of course raises tropospheric temperatures, and temporarily causes a small dip or even just a flattening to the overall long-term rise in ocean heat content. Simply take a look at the last 40 years of ENSO behavior and compare it to ocean heat content, and you’ll see OHC flatten or dip a little after an El Niño. That energy was transferred to the atmosphere, and then of course some of it then went out into space and tropospheric temperatures came back down. But overall, since temperatures have been generally rising in the atmosphere due to the external forcing of additional greenhouse gases, the thermal gradient between ocean and atmosphere has become less steep and the oceans have been accumulating energy. This will continue so long as greenhouse gases continue to accumulate and some equilibrium point is once more reached whereby the oceans are storing energy at the same rate they are losing it to the atmosphere. ENSO is an internal oscillation of the Earth’s overall energy system, that when taken over the long-term does not add any energy to the overall system. It takes an external forcing on the system to do that, such as the rise in greenhouse gas concentrations. Now the character of ENSO may in fact change with the external forcing along with other parts of the climate system.

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Dolphinlegs,

        Your statement about the concentration of CO2 in the ocean would be true if the atmosphere was not accumulating more CO2 (and other greenhouse gases). A great deal of the additional CO2 from anthropogenic activities has gone into the ocean, vastly overwhelming any outgassing from higher ocean temperatures. We know this is the case as we have hard data showing the changing PH of the ocean from it taking up some of the extra CO2.

      • Dolphinlegs

        In addition to the response by R. Gates regarding CO2 absorbed by the oceans, which has been measured by some spot pH measurements until ARGO came along in 2003, there is the additional CO2 absorbed by the biosphere (plants, soils, etc.), which has not been measured at all but is suspected to have increased as plants have responded to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

        About half of the CO2 emitted by humans “remains” in the atmosphere, and this percentage is decreasing as atmospheric concentrations increase.

        Where the “missing” CO2 is going is largely unknown and has not been corroborated with any conclusive empirical measurements, although there are many hypotheses out there – one of which is that it is mostly going into the ocean. I am personally skeptical that this hypothesis is correct.

        While latest ARGO measurements do not show a warming of the ocean since 2003 and there are no good measurements prior to that, it is logical to assume that the ocean has warmed along with the observed late 20th century atmospheric warming. And a warmer ocean would hold a bit less CO2 than a cooler one, as you pointed out to R. Gates.

        So I do not believe there is an answer yet for the “missing” CO2 – and to the question why this percentage has increased.

        Max

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Max said:

        “While latest ARGO measurements do not show a warming of the ocean since 2003.”

        ____

        Again, decidedly untrue. Why to you persist in spreading this kind of misinformation?

      • RGATES
        If prior to the last 16 years oceans were accumulating energy because atmospheric temperatures were rising (due to additional greenhouse gasses), thereby reducing the ocean-atmosphere thermal gradient,
        why would they have continued to accumulate for the last 16 years when atmospheric temperatures were not rising (despite additional greenhouse gasses) ?

      • lolwot

        Yeah.

        And there was a statistically indistinguishable warming cycle from ~1910 to ~1944 (before there was much human CO2). Hard to pretend that didn’t happen, either.

        Max

      • Actually it’s easy to pretend that didn’t happen. That’s before satellite records. Someone who only accepts satellite records will not accept the world warmed from 1910 to 1944.

      • OMG 0.5C? panic time for lolwot

      • Latimer Alder

        @lolwot

        ‘There’s been over 0.5C warming since 1980′

        Wow!

        Temperatures have gone up from 288.1K to 288.6K in thirty two years.

        And I keep on trying to find all the real observed things that have happened as a consequence. Lets see.

        1.Sea level has gone up by about three inches…just like it has in the thirty two years before that and the thirty two before that….
        2. There are a lot more polar bears to eat the native populations
        3. …..i can’t find a third

        Any suggestions?

      • There’s been over 0.5C warming since 1980. Hard to pretend it hasn’t happened.

        But none since 1997. Hard to pretend it has happened. Doesn’t stop pc wingnuts trying though.

    • R Gates

      thanks for the reply but what about the longer historical position?

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        By longer-term position I take it you mean a longer-term forcing on the climate which is of course the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere which will tend to restrict the flow of energy from ocean to atmosphere to space and thus accumulate it in the ocean. In short, the greenhouse gases make the thermal gradient between ocean and space (the ultimate source and drain for the flow of heat in the Earth system) less steep, and so the oceans accumulate energy. Once greenhouse gases stop rising, the system will eventually come back to equilibrium, and the final greenhouse gas concentration will determine the equilibrium temperature of the oceans such that they then accumulate the same amount of energy as they are releasing and the temperatures level off.

      • Dolphinlegs

        Add to R. Gates’ explanation:

        “all other things being equal”

        (which they aren’t)

        Max

      • Sorry I di not make myself clear. In my earlier post I asked abut the 800 year lag between rising temperatures and rising atmospheric CO2 over geological time. My question is why the increase in CO2 did not cause the oceans to warm further and emit more CO2 and so on? The death spiral if you like.

        On the other point you appear to be saying that oceans can warm and be a net absorber of CO2 at the same time and this is what has happened in the recent past?

      • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

        Dolphinlegs,

        Natural feedback processes have been overwhelmed by the rapid growth in atmospheric greenhouse gases. Even if the greenhouse gases stopped increasing today, it will take quite a while for the system to reach equilibrium again. The rock-carbon cycle (through rock weathering) and the take up of CO2 by the oceans are just some of the natural ways the system balances out CO2. Excess CO2 eventually winds up as limestone in the bottom of the ocean to be naturally sequestered, but obviously this takes tens of thousands of years, and the current 40% spike in CO2 levels over long-term Holocene averages has happened in just a few hundred years. The system has been overwhelmed and can’t really keep up, hence temperatures will continue to rise over the long-term.

      • R Gates

        I have come to the conclusion that with the huge natural variabilty we can see through history with Co2 at 280ppm (apparently) and that there is no change in the amount of variabilty with co2 at close to 400ppm., that temperature sensitivity to co2 concentrations has probably peaked somewhere around the 280/300ppm mark.

        Do you believe in the logarithmic curve? If so at what point do YOU think that temperatures will show little reaction to increasing co2.

        tonyb

      • Thanks Mr Gates. Problem is there is no evidence that natural feedback processes have been overwhelmed by what you claim to be rapid growth in greenhouse gases. Thanks for your time. You are one of the better mannered and more reasonable proponents of AGW which puts you in a very small class. The science is not on your side however.

        Regards

      • tonyb, “I have come to the conclusion that with the huge natural variabilty we can see through history with Co2 at 280ppm (apparently) and that there is no change in the amount of variabilty with co2 at close to 400ppm., that temperature sensitivity to co2 concentrations has probably peaked somewhere around the 280/300ppm mark.”

        It doesn’t look like CO2 peaked, but that feedbacks to CO2 peaked. One of the largest feedbacks is snow/ice melt and the water vapor that melt provides. It expands the moist air envelop. Basically, the main water vapor feedback is limited by areal expansion and soil moisture. Once the land surface areal feedback limit is approach, the ocean surface limits begin to dominate. Since the average temperature of the oceans is higher and increased temperature increases latent cooling, the sensitivity of climate to CO2 forcing changes to the lower 0.7 to 1.1 C per doubling range of the oceans.

        Very interesting system of feedbacks and limits.

      • Tony,

        I do believe in the basic logarithmic effect to increasing CO2 concentrations, but measuring how that translates into a final equilibrium temperature (once CO2 stops rising) is not so easy as we all know. What we need to consider is the nature of nonlinear responses in the climate system and specifically bifurcation points (aka tipping points) where thresholds are reached and the system moves into a new mode of operating. We are seeing such point in the Arctic IMO, and this will alter the warming curve for the planet as we approach the ice free summer Arctic condition. Thus, along that logarithmic response curve will be these bifurcation points whereby the system jumps off the curve to follow a new trajectory. Also, do keep in mind the other greenhouse gases that are affecting the overall alteration of the thermal gradient between the oceans and space.

      • R Gates
        The [natural] system [of sequestering CO2] has been overwhelmed and can’t really keep up, hence temperatures will continue to rise over the long-term.

        Only if the warming effect of mankind’s CO2 in the atmosphere is not overwhelmed by natural forces – and we still have precious little understanding of this.

  69. Bottom line: the “no upward trend” has to continue for a total of 15 years before we get worried.

    They are worried that it is not bad, like they promised.

    It is very clear that they are not really worried about the temperature of earth.

    They are worried that their Climate Alarmism has been busted.

  70. It snows more when oceans are warm and it snows less when oceans are cold. Put this in the Climate Models and then they will likely work just fine.

  71. Dr Curry – I think I saw that photo on my Post Office wall. ;-)

  72. This post is predictably crowded with fools putting straight lines on geologic data to prove their pre-concieved conclusions to one peanut gallery or another. The unceasing seriousness and earnest pontificating makes me want to puke in my mouth, but I laugh instead.

    • David Springer

      No wonder you became a regular so quickly. You fit right in with the clowns, huh? Dumbass.

      • Your “sunny” post below confirms you have terminal projection disorder. You have absolutely no idea that *everyone* recognizes that your posts are inelegantly regurgitated talking points from Lord Monkton of Brenchley.

      • Latimer Alder

        @howard

        ‘your posts are inelegantly regurgitated talking points from Lord Monkton of Brenchley’

        I have absolutely no idea if this is ture or not, but assume for the moment that it is.

        Why would this be relevant? Are you at liberty to ignore them because they are ‘talking points’? If so, what is a ‘talking point’ and how does it somehow get not ‘talked about’?

        Or is it the mere mention of Chris Monckton’s name that means you can ignore it?

        Please explain – I have never understood why being a ‘talking point’ is seen by some as an awful condemnation and a reason for avoiding the issue.

      • David Springer

        I don’t pay any attention to Monckton so that means he and I are independently arriving at the same conclusions. That’s not terribly surprising given Monckton’s notoriously keen intellect and our common British heritage.

    • Howard,

      Yr: “This post is predictably crowded with fools…”

      And with a “dog” too–I’m thinkin’, Howard, of everyone’s favorite “elkhound”, of course. In fact, all you hive-bozos need now is a pony an’ you’ll have a real show on your hands.

      And Howard, your “terminal projection disorder” (always with the wannabe-sucker-punch, jejeune psycho-jabber aren’t you, Howard?) “crack” has made Mr. Milquetoast proud, I’m sure. But regular human beings who have a life?–well, their reaction is more along the lines of “Who is this creep-out, anyway?”.

      Jeez, what a crashing, moronic bore you “crushers” inflicted on this blog when you brought on board that Howard dork-ball weirdo guy of yours (I’m guessing he’s a fan-find). Thanks guys!

      • Thanks for the props my brutha. You and your pals are the hive: projecting again. I’m sorry you were stunted during your enlightenment phase. Tell it to your shrink, blame your ex-wife, who cares.

        I snap it off in Fan and Joshua and Mosher too. AGW is real the “C” part is unknown, likely bollocks. You are teamed up with the WUWT putz’ into curve-fitting and linearization of chaotic dynamical systems. You are just the idiotic extreme from the chicken little club.

      • Hey Howard,

        I want to keep my response to you, like, all civil and intellectual and all, and, most especially, I want it to be, in some small way, worthy of those supreme high standards you impose on your own discourse and which I can only admire and imperfectly aspire to but never match:

        “YO MOMMA!”

      • Howard

        AGW is real the “C” part is unknown, likely bollocks

        The most intelligent thing you’ve said here, so far.

        Max

    • This blog alas
      Hive-bots infest
      And Howard ranks
      The crushers’ best

      Been Looking for
      A platitude?
      The mother-lode
      Is this hive-dude

      Your pleasure is
      In comments trite?
      On Howard count
      To get it right

      But that’s not all
      There’s even more
      Ol’ Howard is
      A crashing bore!

      In other words
      This Howard clown
      Is quite enough
      To wear you down

      Thanks for nothing, crushers!

    • I think I’ve finally got Howard figured out:

      Consider the lay of the land. The CAGW scam is imploding big-time which imposes on the hive a desperate struggle to salvage what they can from the whole fiasco in anticipation of a re-groupment on behalf of their next, inevitable, make-a-buck/make-a-gulag, rip-off scheme (the hive-bozos are always up to something).

      And the hive has (as it has always done) expended vast resources identifying not-too-bright, usually momma’s-boy, vulnerable, needy, usually geek-ball kids (the socially-competent, smart kids, who can think for themselves, spotted the CAGW hustle long ago and decided they wanted nothing to do with these hive creep-outs); brainwashing the same to believe in the CAGW scam, in the classroom, since Kindergarten; and then recruiting those same, amazingly stupid tykes, as they entered puberty, as cannon-fodder for “the cause.”

      But now the hive’s investment in “youth” is at risk as the CAGW con becomes so exposed that even a snot-nosed, brain-dead hive-brat can’t avoid the “uncomfortable” truth of the fraud–and the disillusioning realization that he/she has been used by the lefties (duh!). And the lefties need the kid-contingent for their next “BIG-THING”, whatever that might be.

      Enter Howard to save the day! Howard–the new, take-no-prisoners, painfully-whiteboy-jive-talkin’-wannabe, surfer-creep-who-is-ike-really-popular-with-a-certain-type-of-thong-clad-cutsey-beach-bunny-(Eli-up!), like-outta-nowhere, teeny-bopper-smart-mouth “voice” of “youth.”

      And Howard’s pitch?:

      “Sure our hive-masters screwed us whiny, self-absorbed, childish snots over to the max, but that’s just because they are all a bunch of ol’ white-guys just like Lord Monkton and that WUWT guy and all. So you see, fellow hive-abused morons, it’s really all just a generational issue and all. And so my fellow, useful-idiot lads and lasses, don’t get thinking, in the depths of your despair, that joining the “winners” of the climate wars–the guys who were right all along–is the way to go!

      Rather, my easily exploited, obscenely immature borthers and sisters, stay the course and have faith that the hive will get its future scams right–after all the neo-class-enemy-ol’-whiteboys have been fully purged, of course, from the hive by the empowered, man-hater victors of the hive’s recent back-stabbing power-play. I mean, like, think about it, guys–it’s either that or get a real job, you know. ”

      So look for a future hive-scam with a definite, ol’-whiteboy-phobic, youth-profile to it. And who know?–maybe Howard will appear as one of its Philosopher-King, Cull-Master leading lights.He certainly seems to be auditioning for the part on this blog, undoubtedly, with the encouragement of his betters.

      • Nice try Mike. I’ve been a sceptic from Day One. There is no doubt about radiative physics of CO2, H2O and CH4. The medieval warm period was real IMO and Mann erased it with his BS hockey stick. The GCM’s don’t do ocean cycles, clouds nor aerosols very well, so they are of limited use.

        I agree with much of what Dr. Curry is doing, cannot stand the realKlimate cherry-pickers, don’t believe the short-term sensitivity papers by Spencer and Lintzen, I think Isaac Held is a reliable source on modeling, I admire the great work of McIntyre but cannot stand his focus on personality wars, I appreciate Watts surface stations and am nauseated by all of the other pseudoscience he provides a forum for.

        The world is not monochromatic.

      • Howard,

        You know, Howard, when you’re not trying really, really hard to be a horse’s-ass, you come across as a pretty reasonable guy with a point or two to be made. Hope all your future comments are of the quality of your last–if so, I look forward to your future contributions with pleasure, for what that’s worth. .

  73. David Springer

    The sun has entered a record breaking quiet period. When this has happened in the past northern hemisphere got very cold i.e. Daltan and Maunder minimums. The precautionary principle, if anyone actually believed it, would now dictate we prepare for a repeat. At the very least don’t do something so stupid as to make heating fuel more expensive, the atmosphere cooler, growing seasons shorter, crops less drought tolerant, and atmosphere less fertile for plants by lowering CO2 emissions. Are you people nucking futs?

    • The Skeptical Warmist (aka R. Gates)

      Record breaking quiet period? More quiet than the Maunder? Are you sure?
      And how much did volcanic activity affect that period?

      • David Springer

        Is volcanic activity different now than then? If so, why? If there’s no particular reason then we can’t expect it to be different going forward.

        We’re probably not at a Maunder Minima but it’s hard to tell because records are poorer then because, well because observatories were frozen and Europe was starving.

        From wiki:

        “The Dalton Minimum was a period of low solar activity, named after the English meteorologist John Dalton, lasting from about 1790 to 1830.[1] Like the Maunder Minimum and Spörer Minimum, the Dalton Minimum coincided with a period of lower-than-average global temperatures.”

        If volcanism is the cause and it’s just a conicidence that all three temperature minima were accompanied by sunspot minima it would be a quite the conincidence to say the least. More likely there’s a magnetic connection between the iron rich molten core of the planet and the sun’s magnetic field that causes more or less volcanos than volcanism just lining up for no reason, eh? Precautionary principle still should rule in any case because it’s a slam dunk that no warm periods ever lined up with grand solar minima.

      • David, you write “We’re probably not at a Maunder Minima”

        No, we are centainly nowhere near to a Mazunder type minimum. This minimum had it’s lowest temperatures around 1685. Sunspots disappeared around 1645. If Livingston and Penn are correct, then sunspots will not disappear until around 2020. So, no, we are nowhere near a Maunder type minimum……….YET.

      • The answer is that we don’t know whether it was volcanoes or Cheshire Cat Sunspots that caused the cooling @ the Maunder Minimum. Both correlated, perhaps neither causal, possiby even both caused by a mutual other cause. The isotope records is ambivalent and doesn’t resolve the question. The Maunder Minimum sunspots were ‘large, sparse, and primarily Southern Hemispheric’.

        Why primarily in the Southern Hemisphere?
        ===============

      • Meh, I use ‘both’ when there are three phenomena, the volcanoes, the cooling earth, the sunspots changing magnetic strength. You may speculate at will as to causal connections among them.
        ======

      • KIm, you write “The Maunder Minimum sunspots were ‘large, sparse, and primarily Southern Hemispheric’.”

        Do you have a reference for this? I have both of Maunder’s papers, published in 1890 and 1922, and I can find no statement that the sunspots during the minimum were anything like universally large. There is mention of two large spots in 1660 and 1671, but also mention of small spots. Yes, sunspots were sparse and primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but large. Where does this come from?

      • aw, c’mon, Kim.

        We know it was because the hadn’t invented SUVs yet that the folks froze and starved during the Maunder Minimum.

        Max

      • Wow, there is hope for Max. If they had spewed enough ACO2, they could have avoided the LIA. That’s right. Max gets a gold star.

      • Jim, my source was Leif Svalgaard. On a blog comment. It’s probably at his site, somewhere, or he’ll answer you.

        Max, as a joke, long before I got involved in the climate curiosity, I told people a decade ago that we should salute the Brave Soccer Moms, dare-devilling through the front lines of the Carbon Wars with their Suburban Assault Vehicles. Little did I know then, and less do I know now.
        ==============

      • Leif Svalgaard,
        Of solar disposition,
        Informs the ignorant
        And tramples the speculative
        Underfoot,
        Squeezing out the essence
        In angry ferment.
        ============

      • The last graph on this link suggests that a deeper low than the Maunder could be on the cards.

        OK they didn’t extend the graph to 2100, but you can see that the two largest curves didn’t coincide, but delivered the Maunder, but this time round, the two largest curves will coincide (by eyeball) at about 2100 thus delivering a deeper low than the Maunder.
        Since I like Mediterranean temperatures I rather hope that this doesn’t turn out to be the case.

        http://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2012/09/20/how-the-temperature-datasets-tell-us-extra-co2-has-little-effect/

      • If beggars had horses they’d ride ’til it warmed.
        ============================

  74. David Springer

    Steven Mosher | October 15, 2012 at 1:55 pm |

    “Huh Fan? I read the interview. What in gods name are you talking about?”

    If fan talks about anything in someone elses name there’s 95% certainty that he’s lying about that person.

  75. Dr Curry,
    Great article and thanks for standing up for objective climate science. But effective communications of science with newspapers, in your efforts to portray a fair view, means you should send along your own favorite photo. Thanks tall bloke for the little video clip. Judith, you look great to all on the sidelines cheering on your crusade to shove climate science back to objective anlysis of data and away from political agendas.
    Scott

    • That is very good, Judith. It makes several good points. It is one thing for commenters on a blog to fudge the truth, but scientists and the agencies they work for should play fair.

      You don’t make a big deal out one data release when it shows what you want it to show and then next time release it quietly when it shows less warming. The point about giving the error bars on the trend lines and being sure to be clear about whether it is significant is also a good one.

      It was only in the last few years that Santer and others showed that you would need a stretch of 15-17 years without warming before it was necessarily significant. To pretend now (as some on this blog seem to) that they knew all along it is not unusual to have 15 years without warming is indeed being economical with the truth.

      • IPCC AR4

        Since IPCC’s first report in 1990, assessed projections have suggested global average temperature increases between about 0.15°C and 0.3°C per decade for 1990 to 2005. This can now be compared with observed values of about 0.2°C per decade, strengthening confidence in near-term projections.

        HADCRUT4’s 0.03 deg C per decade warming is below IPCC’s range from 0.15 to 0.3 deg C per decade warming.

        As a result, there is no confidence in near-term projections.

    • The GWPF of course includes highly experienced policy-makers and policy advisers, the kind of people who I hoped would be invited to the RS workshop.

    • David Springer

      It’s kind of sad when an organization (GWPF) stating the obvious about the temperature record, which has been available and up to date from RSS and UAH all along, is considered “good” by one of the world’s top climatologists. Every point made by GWPF is one I made here months earlier in more detail. They hinted at but missed the alarming decline in global average temperature since 2010 for example which I’ve pointed out on many occasions will be the death of us all if it continues or accelerates for much more than a decade.

      http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/rss/last:33/plot/rss/last:33/trend/plot/rss/last:33/trend/detrend:-0.4

      This trend, down 0.4C in the 33 months since January 1, 2010, is a whopping -1.45C per decade. It will wipe out all the warming since 1880 in about 5 years and plunge us back into another Little Ice Age in 20 years. Should we wait another 12 years before we start to worry?

      Interestingly this steep decline started when we noticed the sun had gone uber quiet. We should probably begin to worry real soon now that Svensmark is the man who got the story right and unless the sunspots return real soon now we’re in for a world of hurt. Cold is something to be alarmed about. Warm isn’t.

  76. Headache: The evidence is beginning to suggest that global warming may be happening much slower than the catastrophists have claimed – a conclusion with enormous policy implications for politicians at Westminster, pictured

  77. Climate pattern according to HADCRUT4, HADCRUT3, GISTEMP, RSS MSU, and UAH NSSTC => http://bit.ly/S0otl3

  78. Pingback: Paging Al Gore: Global Warming Stopped in 1997

  79. Pingback: Paging Al Gore: Global Warming Stopped in 1997 - ALIPAC

  80. Say, you wanna see a photograph? Here’s a picture worth a thousand words – and a graph that’s worth a thousand words as well!

    http://www.alipac.us/f19/paging-al-gore-global-warming-stopped-1997-a-265412/#post1308071

  81. There have been several references to cherrypicking the start date of the plateau in global T’s under discussion. Some CAGW supporters have indicated that the 1997/8 El Nino is an unfair starting point to assess this plateau because it was unprecedented “noise”. (although their ilk are quite happy to accept it as OK for assessing the warming phase until then…. For instance the Manna hockey-stick ended at 1998 in the 2001 IPCC report which although otherwise revised was free of any edit for the inconvenient lower T’s in 2000)

    However, the ENSO (and other cycles) whilst described as noise by some, are demonstrably unavoidable drivers in the T record. What is more, the same records show that there was a substantial “correction” with the 1999/2000 La Nina” immediately following this so-called super 1998 El Nino. In terms of trends there is thus a cancelling or smoothing effect. This is perhaps most easily seen in HADCRUT3 here#:
    http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/temperature/nhshgl.gif

    Furthermore, according to the Oct 2012 NOAA multivariate ENSO index, the 1997/8 El Nino was somewhat similar to that of 1983/4 which has not been argued as a “super El Nino” as far as I’m aware: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/enso/mei/ts.gif

    Furthermore some other things can be inferred if the graph is accurate:
    • The cooling phase after 1940 is strongly supported by a predominance of La Ninas.
    • The warming phase up to 1998 is strongly supported by a predominance of El Ninos.
    • The recent plateau and its ups and downs are strongly supported by a roughly equal distribution of the blue and red.

    # BTW, they use a 21-year filtered smoothing and the final ten years of the black smoothing line cannot be based on their algorithm or proper data but by their “intuition”.

  82. Laying in a hint to forshadow what is to come–i.e., 10 years from now GCMs will see what we obviously know actually happened today. And, as ludicrous as that sounds GCMs still fail in hindcasting ability. How’s that for shining a spotlight on the incompetence of the Climatists of Western academia?

  83. “Soclates” ?? A Greek philosopher with a lisp ?

    • Latimer Alder

      @petra

      ‘A Greek philosopher with a lisp ?’

      That wath, of courthe, the unforgettable Megarian thinker

      ‘Thrathymachuth of Corinth’

      who came in a direct philosphical line from Soclates himself.

      But thome authoritieth think that Arithtotle altho had trouble with hith thibilanth.

    • Petra,

      That would be John McCarthy. Perhaps it refers to an old philosopher who likes lattes. Or to Latimer when he’s entertaining what he dubiously calls socratic dialogues. Or when Latimer asks over and over again if water is wet.

    • > “Soclates” ?? A Greek philosopher with a lisp ?

      No, changing ‘r’s to ‘l’s is characteristic of a Chinese accent.

  84. Gates, the fact remains that for the oceans to keep warming as a result of atmospheric warming, the atmosphere itself has to keep warming.

    You dispute this but give no reason….

    So tell us : if the agent of ocean warming is atmospheric warming, and there is no atmospheric warming, how exactly does the non-existent atmospheric warming warm the ocean ?

  85. Well, Willard, 15/10 @10.32-m. I’ll dance ter that!

    Yer Baz Luhmann homespun philosophee video
    speaks ter me.and I will not fergit the sunscreen,
    ‘Shine on, o shine, life giving Sol.’

    (I enjoyed Priscilla too.)

  86. Jim D | October 16, 2012 at 12:52 am |

    Seems you fundamentally disagree with Gates about ocean warming.

    He says it’s down to the ocean-atmosphere temperature gradient slowing ocean cooling.

    You say the gradient is irrelevant, you can get downwelling IR even though the upwelling IR hasn’t warmed the CO2 (and hence the atmosphere). IOW, you’re saying CO2 doesn’t first need to be warmed to part with any heat. How does that work?

  87. Aka R.Gates,

    Do not shut the gate after the horse has left the building – this particular horse is called Elvis ) … and re warming, do – not – put – the – cart – before – the – horse. Jest – sayin,’ … What – do – I – know?

    ( I am not asking YOU Tempterrain.)

  88. By 2015 there will be 20 years of no warming (roughly). By 2020 it will be 30 years of no warming. That’s my prediction. Sorry for being so certain.

    • Not expecting any sunspot activity then?

      • I’m not sure what you mean. I’m expecting the SC 24/25 minimum not before ~2021 and yes, there will be no sunspot activity during the minimum.

      • The Maunder Minimum period was characterised by low sunspot activity and generally lower temperatures were experienced. Sounded to me like you were basing your prediction on this phenomenon re-occurring and I was just asking if that was the case and whether you consider it a possibility that it could extend for as long?

      • I consider it a possibility, but I don’t know. From my reading, the SC 25 is predicted to be weak too, maybe even weaker than SC 24. The SC 23 was also weak. I think three consecutive weak cycles will cause a lot of cooling.

        Furthermore, if the long-term cooling since the Holocene optimum is to be continued and maybe even become more rapid (glacial?), the warming since the LIA has to stop sooner or later. The scene is set for cooling in the next few decades. How cold it will get, I don’t know.

  89. Thorry, latimer, yer gettin;’ Thocrates, I mean ‘Socrates’ confused with Violet Elizabeth….

    And while I’m still here, let me issue a warning: No one…repeat…
    NO ONE, in my presence, play games with the sainted name of
    SOCRATES, advocate of the open society, which I will defend ter the death.. (from henbane) … with me trusty lassoe! *

    * And don’t go sayin’ this is argument from authority because it ain’t.

    • Beth,

      I was not playing games with Socrates name, but with Latimer’s.

      I prefered to tease him instead of reminding him of what is a socratic dialog. But to get it off of my chest, here you go:

      > The general rules of elenchus are these: Socrates’ partner (often called his interlocutor) must answer every question according to his own beliefs, and the partner (not the audience if there is one) judges the outcome. Socrates’ questions start from his partner’s initial statement, which usually implies a claim to wisdom or to knowledge of a subject related to virtue. Sometimes Socrates seeks clarification of the claim; at other times he proceeds directly to elicit his partner’s agreement to premises that will turn out to be inconsistent with the initial claim. In some cases, the premises have no authority aside from the partner’s agreement; in others, Socrates provides an argument for premises, usually in the form of an epagoge, a general inference from a set of examples. An elenchus usually concludes in the discomfiture of the partner, who now appears unable to support his initial statement. Some form of elenchus is probably responsible for Socrates’ claim in the Apology that he has demonstrated that every claimant to wisdom whom he has examined has failed the test (21b-23b). In the dialogues of this group, the elenchus is a negative instrument, but in the Gorgias Socrates seems to use it in support of his bedrock principle. In some cases, an elenchus seems only to discredit a person; in others it refutes a position that is under discussion. In those cases, it points the dialogue that contains it toward aporia—an impasse. Socrates applied the method to challenge views he probably held himself (as we shall see in the Laches), and he implies in the Hippias Major that he has used elenchus to prevent his being complacent with his own ignorance (304c-e).

      http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/plato-ethics-shorter/#2

      Latimer’s confabulations with Stirling and Joe have very little to do with this truth-seeking method.

  90. Don’cha mean ‘Srasymachuth of Corins. Latimer? Fer godsake, get yer nomenclature thtraight! … Now you’ve got me doing it. :- (

  91. Chief Hydrologist

    Dateline Cairns. There is the top of a huge Poinsetta outside my fourth floor window which the flying foxes are using as a staging post for foraging. Amazing.

    The best ENSO animation I know of can be found at Duke University.

    What the critics say?

    ‘•holy crap, Tachiro. That was massively more fascinating than I anticipated. I can’t even imagine the amount of work that went into producing this. … Very well done! etc.

    Here’s the youtube post – the Duke link is there.

    Clouds are interesting. Zhu et al (2007) found that cloud formation for ENSO and for global warming have different characteristics and are the result of different physical mechanisms. The change in low cloud cover in the 1997-1998 El Niño came mainly as a decrease in optically thick stratocumulus and stratus cloud. The decrease is negatively correlated to local SST anomalies, especially in the eastern tropical Pacific, and is associated with a change in convective activity. ‘During the 1997–1998 El Niño, observations indicate that the SST increase in the eastern tropical Pacific enhances the atmospheric convection, which shifts the upward motion to further south and breaks down low stratiform clouds, leading to a decrease in low cloud amount in this region. Taking into account the obscuring effects of high cloud, it was found that thick low clouds decreased by more than 20% in the eastern tropical Pacific… In contrast, most increase in low cloud amount due to doubled CO2 simulated by the NCAR and GFDL models occurs in the subtropical subsidence regimes associated with a strong atmospheric stability.’

    Clements et al (2009) found decadal variability in clouds in the north eastern Pacific – an abrupt change to less cloud in the late 1970′s and a change to more cloud after 1998.

    http://s1114.photobucket.com/albums/k538/Chief_Hydrologist/?action=view&current=Clementetal2009.png

    Burgman et al 2008 found the same thing for the central Pacific.

    As well as this decadal variability – which is mainstream science and not denied by anyone but the space cadets – there is much longer term variability.

    http://s1114.photobucket.com/albums/k538/Chief_Hydrologist/?action=view&current=Vance2012-AntarticaLawDomeicecoresaltcontent.jpg

    http://s1114.photobucket.com/albums/k538/Chief_Hydrologist/?action=view&current=ENSO11000.gif

    A lack of warming for a decade or three more seems almost bankable – but I wouldn’t be surprised at a longer term potential.

    And if Beth starts talking lassos – well I just can’t help myself.

  92. Chief,

    Climate modellers in cloud towers,
    Wiling away the passing hours,
    Seem ter have trouble with –clouds.

    O/t Say, Chief, that Lonie Lane sure is a gorgeous , and
    musical cowgirl, lol, — and very good with the lassoe too.

  93. David Springer

    curryja | October 15, 2012 at 8:32 pm | Reply

    Good article by GWPF
    http://www.thegwpf.org/the-mail-on-sunday-and-the-met-office/
    —————————————————————————————-

    It’s kind of sad when an organization (GWPF) stating the obvious about the temperature record, which has been available and up to date from RSS and UAH all along, is considered “good” by one of the world’s top climatologists. Every point made by GWPF is one I made here months earlier in more detail. They hinted at but missed the alarming decline in global average temperature since 2010 for example which I’ve pointed out on many occasions will be the death of us all if it continues or accelerates for much more than a decade.

    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/rss/last:33/plot/rss/last:33/trend/plot/rss/last:33/trend/detrend:-0.4

    This trend, down 0.4C in the 33 months since January 1, 2010, is a whopping -1.45C per decade. It will wipe out all the warming since 1880 in about 5 years and plunge us back into another Little Ice Age in 20 years. Should we wait another 12 years before we start to worry?

    Interestingly this steep decline started when we noticed the sun had gone uber quiet. We should probably begin to worry real soon now that Svensmark is the man who got the story right and unless the sunspots return real soon now we’re in for a world of hurt. Cold is something to be alarmed about. Warm isn’t.

    • They hinted at but missed the alarming decline in global average temperature since 2010 for example which I’ve pointed out on many occasions will be the death of us all if it continues or accelerates for much more than a decade.

      Sometimes, the nuttiness here is simply eyeball-bursting. That was a double-dip La Nina from which GAT and TLT GAT trends are rapidly recovering. I think this might be most absurd over interpretation of the shortest period of data I’ve yet seen. Bravo.

      • BBD,
        Have you ever heard of the Gish Gallop?

        It is a technique perfected in the Intellient Design and Creationist movements where as many arguments and half-truths and strawmen are thrown in the mix as possible. This keeps the opponent off-balance, especially in a realtime setting.

        Not surprising that Springer uses this approach, considering how much effort he has spent defending ID over the years. He must think it will work here. Unfortunately, it doesn’t and won’t, because during written discourse, one can take their time and pick apart any fallacious argument.

      • Heard of the GG? WHT, I hear the hooves thundering in my dreams ;-)

      • WebHubTelescope,

        Here’s how to defeat Gish gallops:

        http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/917366704

        Gish gallops have not been invented for eternal processes like the Internet.

      • David Springer

        You’re projectiong again. You can’t effectively argue a single point I make. Go ahead and try.

      • David Springer

        BBD

        Well little buddy when you are able to explain what causes La Ninas then you can explain to me why they can’t be influenced changes in solar activity. Until then you should probably STFU about them because for all you know there’s a long train of them heading our way.

  94. Back at
    Jim Cripwell | October 15, 2012 at 7:11 am
    I wrote, as my main point,
    @@@
    This is precisely what has happened recently. In the latter part of the 20th century, there was a trend of rise of global temperatures that was greater than the average of around 0.06 C. This was, wrongly, interpreted by the proponents of CAGW as a sign that CAGW was real. Now we are observing the trend to a rise of temperature that is considerably less than 0.06 C per decade. Situation normal. If the past is a guide to the future, this is exactly what we should expect.
    @@@
    In response to this
    JCH | October 15, 2012 at 8:23 am | wrote

    “What a load of total crap.”
    When asked what he based this on he wrote
    “When did the LIA end? It’s an arbitrary guess. When did the conditions that caused the LIA end?”

    This is typical of the tactics on the warmists. The claim is made that what I wrote was total crap, but then when asked why, JCH tries to introduce threadjacking; picking something that was totally irrelevant to my main point, so as to try and take the discussion into irrelevances.

    What I would like to know, is why JCH accuses me of writing total crap, and then refuses to show any science to back up this contention. How about it JCH? Are you prepared to put some science into your accusation? Or by staying silent, can I take it that you agree that you are completely wrong in your accusation, and what I wrote is, in fact, quite correct?

    By the way, R. Gates, if you want to join in the discussion, be my guest

    • Jim, you are supported by the following published paper:

      Wu et al.
      On the time-varying trend in global-mean surface temperature

      …we showed that the rapidity of the warming in the late twentieth century was a result of concurrence of a secular warming trend and the warming phase of a multidecadal (~65-year period) oscillatory variation and we estimated the contribution of the former to be about 0.08 deg C per decade since ~1980.

      http://bit.ly/PDBWyZ

      The secular warming rate is 0.08 deg C per decade, not IPCC’s 0.2 deg C per decade.

      As a result, climate sensitivity = 3 * (0.08/0.2) = 1.2 deg C for doubling of CO2.

  95. Misquoted by David Rose again, eh? Is that becoming a yearly tradition?

    Remember when I asked you about it at the time (see our short conversation here). You said: “At the moment, I’m feeling manipulated by both Rose and BEST.”

    But you still talked to him, and got misquoted again. Poor you!

    In the meantime, David Rose’s lies have traveled halfway around the world again. Caused quite a little controversy in the Netherlands, my home country.

    Be sure to talk to him next time. You’re doing a great job.

    • US and other non-UK readers should know that the Daily Mail is a favoured mouthpiece of the UK fake-sceptic front organisation the GWPF. This is the environment within which Rose is operating. Dr Curry need not be overly surprised that she is misrepresented by a hack writing at the behest of misrepresenters. The GWPF founder Lord Lawson and DM editor Paul Dacre go back a long way. This is all about the political right and its corporate sponsors and tax vs science. Same old, in other words.

      More here and here.

      • Dr Curry need not be overly surprised

        How can she be surprised? The exact same thing happened to her last year. Fool me once…

        But keep supporting GWPF and EIKE. They’re so much better than that IPCC-mafia.

      • Well, these articles are not primarily about ‘me’, and I try to step outside my own ego in evaluating them and in engaging with reporters. I have been misquoted so often that at this point I pretty much roll my eyes, and correct it in an online statement on my blog. note this was not my reaction the first time in 2006 with the ‘brain fossilization’ misquote, when I stopped talking to reporters, and in the wake of climategate I put all my statements online at climateaudit, so there would be no way for me to be misquoted. I gave up on that when a very reputable reporter used one of my statements verbatim, but without the complete context.

        Re David Rose, he is writing thought provoking articles, even if I don’t agree with everything he says. I enjoy my conversations with him. Next time for sure i will raise the misquote issue (and insist on a better picture, if he uses one :) )

      • David Rose, he is writing thought provoking articles

        You mean, he is spreading disinformation by lying? Thought provoking indeed. Somehow I doubt you’d ever talk to him again if he’d misquoted you by saying something along the lines of: “Dr Curry deplores the conservatism and scientific reticence of the IPPC, and is convinced that AGW is a very dangerous problem that needs to be addressed immediately.”

        In other words, you let yourself willingly be used for disinformation purposes, and then play the “gee golly, what a surprise”-card. Rationalisation: the other side does it too.

        How’s the bridge building going? Maybe David Rose and GWPF have some more explosives for you. :-D

      • Heinrich the Norwegian Elkhound


        How’s the bridge building going? Maybe David Rose and GWPF have some more explosives for you.

        But interdisciplinary bridges are like the damnable IPCC climate models – so idiosyncratic, complex, and chock-full of uncertainties. You just never know what words they’ll make you say.

        Oh well, as the saying goes, a picture is worth 1,000 words.

    • Non-UK readers should know that the GWPF is only “fake-sceptic” in the eyes of obviously fake alarmists like BBD who always take the side of politics over science, in traditional totalitarian/leftwing style – hence the craven support of any alarmism as at all, no matter how pathetic (the sort of tripe one expects from the politics-before-facts BBC, an horrendously biased and vastly inferior source of news relative to the Daily Mail, which is itself not the best).

      • Please provide examples where I do this Erica. Most browsers provide an internal search function. On your search you will find lots of examples of me talking about science. And not much else. But see what you can turn up.

      • When you have gathered the necessary material to support your comment you can read the links I provided. You can read about the way that Lawson’s GWPF does nothing but misrepresent the science for political motives. That being the politics of the right in the service of its corporate sponsors.

        Do wake up Erica. This stuff is painfully obvious to everybody else.

      • On your search you will find BBD lying about people and harping unceasingly about the sanctity of Hansen’s writing and the vileness of everyone who who disagrees with him. Erica, BBD is one of the absurdist characters that haunts the climate debate. Just say ‘thanks for sharing’ and move on to more substantial contributors.

      • Tom Fuller:

        Erica, BBD is one of the absurdist characters that haunts the climate debate.

        Thanks for the word absurdist (and indeed haunt) there Tom. My vocabulary hasn’t been up to it. Mind you, any frank labeling of such pseuds tends to make them change behavior for a while to seek to discredit the critic. BBD is well capable of stints of apparent non-absurdity. But absurdist is I think spot on for the -ist speaks of an ideology that wishes to make all debate on this subject absurd. And that we are right to fight with all our heart.

      • It’s funny how any mention of the secretive, politically motivated propaganda machine that is the GWPF brings all sorts of interesting people out of the woodwork.

        Hi Richard! How’s the paranoia coming on these days?
        :-)

      • It depends whose. The paranoia of Stephan Lewandowsky, which seems all too common among those you admire, prompted Alex Cull to write on 3rd August:

        The “oil-funded cli­mate deni­alist con­spiracy theory” (for want of a better and more suc­cinct name) appears to be a variant of the crop of ideas that were rampant about Jewish plu­to­crats a cen­tury ago, but with Exxon and the Koch brothers standing in for the Elders of Zion.

        I enlarged on this on Bishop Hill on 29th August:

        In 1930s it was the conspiracist worldview around the fabricated Protocols of the Elders of Zion, combined with the false science of eugenics, that goaded the paranoids of that generation into building the gas chambers of Treblinka and Auschwitz. …

        Note that the Nazi Party was one of the few organizations in modern history that actively boasted, among its members, that it was a conspiracy. In the face of this reality it was possible to be too credulous in the anti-conspiracist direction. One naturally thinks of Neville Chamberlain and his meeting with Hitler in Munich in September 1938 but what about Winston Churchill and Konrad Henlein, the Sudeten German politician, in London in May of the same year? Henlein was in the pay of the Nazis, though both parties denied this, as is the way with real-world conspirators. And Churchill was totally taken in, as he met the Sudeten, “looked him in the eye” and largely trusted his Hitler-inspired sob story about his downtrodden people.

        Not of course that the parallel necessarily stands – that we have a bunch of dangerous and delusional paranoids in our own day, a fanatical core of whom are also eager conspirators. But history would warn us from completely discounting the possibility.

        Because real paranoia is so serious – as is the opposite mistake of wilful credulity – contributors like you should be more open about a number of things, including their real identity. You stir up trouble, walk away scot free and feel free to accuse any critics with real-world reputations to think of of paranoia. Such games ceased to be amusing around 1941. Please desist.

      • contributors like you should be more open about a number of things, including their real identity. You stir up trouble, walk away scot free and feel free to accuse any critics with real-world reputations to think of of paranoia. Such games ceased to be amusing around 1941. Please desist.

        Not so good then. Sorry to hear that.

      • You’re right it’s not good.

      • BBD
        I need look no further than your propagandistic drivel about the GWPF immediately above.

        The GWPF quite often reports on how the IPCC does nothing but misrepresent the science for political motives. That being the politics of the left in the service of totalitarian ideology. That this annoys you – hence your militant support of politically-funded and politically-corrupted science – places you in the same camp. It wouldn’t surprise me in the least that you hero-worship Mann and the others for their dogged sabotaging of the science process.

        Do wake up BBD. This stuff is painfully obvious to everybody else.

      • Ah, that’s a complete co-out Erica. You just got caught saying stuff and being completely unable to back it up! Naughty!
        :-)

        Tom got caught doing it too – and not for the first time! Naughty Tom too!

        :-)

      • Paleeze. How about your slightly earlier comment, annoyed that the politically-motivated alarmist frauds exposed by Climategate that you can’t being yourself to criticise, haven’t been swept under the carpet yet?

        And yes I know you don’t only rant in support of totalitarian objectives, you do also talk science. With the caveat that, as just mentioned, you don’t want the process of science examined in cases where your political objectives might suffer a setback.

      • BBD It’s funny how any mention of the secretive, politically motivated propaganda machine that is the GWPF brings all sorts of interesting people out of the woodwork.

        A laughable distortion. The GWPF is merely a natural reaction to the politically funded and hence politically motivated climate science establishment that betrays the taxpayers it leeches off. Government climate scientists “conclude” CAGW for the same reason tobacco industry scientists once “concluded” smoking was safe – that’s what these lackies were selected and funded to do.

        Are you one of these lying leeches, BBD ?

      • A laughable distortion. The GWPF is merely a natural reaction to the politically funded and hence politically motivated climate science establishment that betrays the taxpayers it leeches off.

        Conspiracy theorist! The funniest thing I’ve seen since the Great Heartland Billboard Implosion was the way the loon-o-sphere went berserk with fury when Lewandowsky used the c-word. Thanks for a pitch-perfect demonstration of exactly the kind of nutty paranoid conspiracy narrative you lot so vehemently claim is *not* your defining characteristic.

        Are you one of these lying leeches, BBD?

        No. I’m a retired businessman pursuing my various hobbies. The GWPF is one such. I declare a vested interest in the laws of physics, ice sheet dynamics and realpolitik.

      • BBD | October 17, 2012 at 3:31 am |

        >A laughable distortion. The GWPF is merely a natural reaction to the politically funded and hence politically motivated climate science establishment that betrays the taxpayers it leeches off.

        Conspiracy theorist!

        Laughable. You have it back-to-front. Since the very obvious vested interest of the state lies in promoting alarmism – which is what they are actually doing – this is normal behaviour for them – ie anything but a conspiracy. It is people like you who are conspiracy theorists – for suggesting that government climate scientists (you know, the ones behind Climategate and other alarmist frauds) are secretly plotting to be honest and objective rather than doing what is in their paymaster’s interests; the Climategate deniers/dismissers.

        In your book then, anyone who notices the blatant fraud and politically-motivated bias in government-funded climate science, is a conspiracy theorist. No doubt you’d prefer them to remain silent so the alarmist deception can continue undisturbed.

        And in you find cretinous hilarity in people denying the drivel Lewandowsky produced. Small things suffice I guess.

      • Be sure to look for all the things Tom believes you will find too Erica.

        Make a list, with links, and post them here.

        Good luck!

      • Erica | October 16, 2012 at 8:38 am |

        You’re kidding, right?

        GWPF has the highest score on techniques of propaganda of virtually any organization participating in any public forum on virtually any topic. They’re secretive, deceptive, extremely well-funded polemicists connected at the top levels of government, academia of a certain politicaland religious bent, and media on three continents.

        They certainly don’t need unpaid defenders coming to the aid of their cause.

      • @bart r

        ‘GWPF has the highest score on techniques of propaganda of virtually any organization participating in any public forum on virtually any topic. They’re secretive, deceptive, extremely well-funded polemicists connected at the top levels of government, academia of a certain politicaland religious bent, and media on three continents.’

        They are?

        Wow

        When I last went to one of their dos, they were having great difficulty in getting the audio system working properly at a MacSteve lecture and social (report and discussion here).

        http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2012/8/18/mcintyre-in-london.html

        http://bishophill.squarespace.com/blog/2012/8/16/steve-mcintyre-at-the-gwpf-cartoon-notes-by-josh.html

        If they really are the arch manipulators of your imagination, they cover it up extremely well. The biscuits were OK though.

      • Latimer Alder | October 16, 2012 at 12:43 pm |

        It wasn’t actually a competency score I intended.

        But then, if competency were especially being judged, and the incompetent excluded, the climate discourse would be much, much smaller.

      • Latimer Alder

        @bart r

        ‘It wasn’t actually a competency score I intended’

        Well, if they can do all the things you claim (got any backup for those assertions btw?) and still not be competent enough to make a straightforward sound system work at a high-profile public meeting, then they really must be supermen…or their opposite.

        As far as I can tell, the GWPF is composed of Nigel Lawson (who is now 80 and quite frail) when he is not at home in France, Benny Peiser, a few office staff (I’m guessing 2 or 3) and occasional guest writers such as Anthony Montford (The Hockey Stick Illusion) and Matt Ridley

        Full list here

        http://www.thegwpf.org/who-we-are/gwpf-reports/

        I think they do a fantastic job and do a great deal to highlight the sceptical/realist case as a counterweight to the greenist/alarmist horde. And few politicians could lightly ignore something to read backed by both Vaclav Klaus and Nigel Lawson. But the they are no more the eminences grises behind climate scepticism than anybody else.

        The reason the greenist/alarmist cause is losing political traction is very simple. The case was vastly overstated for about a decade. And the fact that the global average temperature is pretty much unchanged between now and 15 years ago, despite all the warnings of imminent catastrophe.

        Ordinary people can see and understand this and wonder what all the fuss, expense, time and trouble has all been for. And the answer s simple too. If we had done nothing at all in the name of greenism, our climate today would be very similar. It has all been a complete waste of time. .

        It doesn’t need all the supposed chicanery you write about to bring this home….the data tells them that, and you credit the ordinary people with too little intelligence if you need to invoke ‘dark forces’ to do so.

      • Bart R | October 16, 2012 at 11:16 am | Reply

        You’re kidding, right?

        The climate establishment has the highest score on techniques of propaganda and outright deception of virtually any organization participating in any public forum on virtually any topic. They’re secretive, deceptive, extremely well-funded polemicists connected at the top levels of government, academia of a certain political bent, and media on all continents.

        They certainly don’t need unpaid defenders coming to the aid of their cause.

        And the GWPF? Their funding is miniscule compared to the whole state apparatus behind alarmism.

      • > And the GWPF? Their funding is miniscule [...]

        What they need to sell is miniscule too.

        You’re not here to debate, Erica, you’re here to sloganize.

      • Heinrich the Norwegian Elkhound

        Erica:

        This stuff is painfully obvious to everybody else.

        Oh dear.

        Yet another ‘Defender of True Science’ just cannot understand why anyone else would trust scientific reports rather than fake ‘reports’ from ‘think-tanks’, and overbearing, self-satisfied, evidence-free blog posts by people who take themselves way too seriously…


        And the GWPF? Their funding is miniscule compared to the whole state apparatus behind alarmism.

        My personal climate report (still in draft format, just like Tony’s) got no funding at all – Therefore it must be even more right than the one by GWPF.

        Honestly – What us ‘alarmists’ really need are more cut-to-the-chase posts by ‘lurker’ and ‘mike’ – You know the type – Their ‘science reporting’ has all the latest rhetorical flourishes and positively oozes deep concern for our ruined reputations.

        Erica – Step right up! Batteries not included.

      • Erica

        Give up.

        You can’t use reason to debate with the Hound from No-way.

        He’s on some sort of doggy drugs and speaks in doggy-talk.

        Bow-wow!

        Max

      • > You can’t use reason to debate [...]

        Of course she could, could she?

      • Erica | October 16, 2012 at 11:39 am |

        You raise a valid point.

        A side-by-side comparison of each set of claims is a much more valid way of judging the issue than mere assertion.

        So, we should take some time, gather up our facts and evidence about the sources of funding, individuals involved, lists of activities associated with this ‘climate establishment’ (do you mean just the IPCC, or the IPCC and the EPA, or the whole ‘world government’ thing?)

        Oh. That’s right. _You_ can get those numbers and names and facts and activities. The IPCC and EPA and governments of the world are all public. While the GWPF enjoys the tax breaks of a charitable organization, its actual sources of funding are secret, and its members habitually hide or deny that they’re undertaking GWPF activities.

        So we can’t actually have a fair comparison.

        Maybe you could prevail on your GWPF friends to exercise transparency and release that information?

      • willard (@nevaudit) | October 16, 2012 at 12:18 pm |
        > And the GWPF? Their funding is miniscule [...]
        What they need to sell is miniscule too.
        You’re not here to debate, Erica, you’re here to sloganize.

        A vacuous comment, even by your standards. You have no answer, but don’t want to face up to it.

      • Bart
        The ‘government thing’ is done with money seized from taxpayers, ie through coercion. It is right and proper that everything it does should be publicly available (including all their work-related emails, btw).

        The GWPF, by contrast, is funded voluntarily, and is under no such obligation. Any more than you or I are expected to reveal our finances.

        To boot, I think it’s safe to say the budget of the ‘government thing’ is untold orders of magnitude bigger than that of the GWPF.

        And how moral is it for government to use our money to further its own interests – ie putting out the CAGW story to it can justify raised taxes, have more regulatory powers, etc ?

      • ElkHound

        You wonder why anyone would distrust government science. Try Climategate. That’s why organizations like GWPF have emerged.

      • Heinrich the Norwegian Elkhound


        You wonder why anyone would distrust government science. Try Climategate. That’s why organizations like GWPF have emerged.

        “Government science”?
        As opposed to “Privately-funded, un-accountable, think-tank pseudo-science”?
        Good luck with that.

        Distrust science of all kinds. No problem. Analyze the data-trends yourself. Run the models yourself. Read the publications yourself.

        Meanwhile, do you really believe the GWPF has an objective view of any scientific issue? Check their history – Check their membership.
        Apply some skepticism.

      • Erica | October 17, 2012 at 1:39 am |

        So, you’re willing to make a comparison that can’t be confirmed, and then not stand by the comparison by asserting a double standard?

        Whatever.

      • Elkhound

        Government pseudo-science etc.

        The layman’s problem is which expert to trust. From Climategate, and the deafening failure of other government-funded scientists to cry foul (to say nothing of the authorities’ official attempts to whitewash it), we know for certain that government climate science is riddled with corruption. It’s override science with politics – more taxes and more regulators.

        Use some skepticism, follow the money and the vested interest (which by the way is orders of magnitude larger than anything GWPF can even imagine).

    • BBD and Erica

      Global readers of IPCC climate reports should know that IPCC is a favored mouthpiece of the fake alarmist UNEP organization. That the UNEP fake alarmist position is driven by a purely political agenda should also be clear to all global readers. This is the environment in which the individuals implicated in the Climategate scandal are operating. In the eyes of obviously fake alarmists such as BBD, these individuals and their government sponsors have done no wrong, since they support his personal fake-alarmist view. To distract from these scandals and the revelations of bogus data in the supposedly “gold standard” IPCC reports, BBD and others attack a silly British newspaper.

      • [The IPCC] is the environment in which the individuals implicated in the Climategate scandal are operating

        Their frauds enjoying the full backing of the IPCC. And of course its sycophants like BBD, who cannot bring themselves to criticize anything or anyone that advances the political agenda of alarmism, no matter what.

      • Mouthpiece. Fake alarmist. Fake alarmist. Political agenda.

        YesButClimategate. Alarmists. Fake-alarmist view.

        Scandals. Bogus.

        Alarmist. Alarmist. Alarmist. Alarmism.

        Alarming. Alarm. Alarmist.

        Bogus.

      • willard

        Is that your assessment of IPCC AR4 WG1 report?

        Max

      • manacker,

        No, it’s your echo.

  96. BBD (and lolwot)

    It is cooling.

    It has been for 12 or 15 years.

    Don’t be a “climate denier”.

    Get used to it.

    Max

    PS You should rejoice! (Weren’t you worried about rampant warming?)

    • Rubbish. A reduction in the rate of warming is not the same as cooling (net energy loss from the climate system). You are misrepresenting the facts.

      • And if you produce a graph starting at the pinnacle of the 1998 El Nino temperature spike, I will laugh at you…

      • BBD

        Here is an IPCC AR4 statement:

        Since IPCC’s first report in 1990, assessed projections have suggested global average temperature increases between about 0.15°C and 0.3°C per decade for 1990 to 2005. This can now be compared with observed values of about 0.2°C per decade, strengthening confidence in near-term projections.

        Isn’t what we see less than the lower limit of IPCC’s range of 0.15 to 0.3 deg C per decade warming?

        Who is the denier here?

      • Look at NH land surface temperatures.

      • BBD

        Look at NH land surface temperatures.

        Huh?

        Why “cherry pick” that when we have several “global” temperature records?

        Max

      • BBD

        “Cooling” is the phenomenon that can be measured by a reduction of temperature.

        A linear trend of “globally and annually averaged land and sea surface temperature anomaly” shows a slightly lower temperature today than when the millennium started (1/1/2001).

        Ergo one can conclude that it has cooled slightly.

        [Don't be a "denialist" - that's what the "pause" is all about, BBD, in case you missed it.]

        Max

      • Cherry picking start points and using very short time series is standard ‘denier’ tactics Max, as we both know perfectly well. So instead look at 30 year climatologies. What will we see in 2030 I wonder? Perhaps the laws of physics will just stop applying and the radiative forcing from CO2 will vanish.

        Or perhaps not. Rather more likely is that physics will operate as it has always done and will always do. RF from an increased fraction of atmospheric CO2 will slowly cause energy to continue to accumulate in the climate system (mainly the mixed and intermediate ocean layers).

        What do we see today? OHC down to 2000m is rising. Land surface temperatures are rising. SSTs are rising… Not as fast as 1975 – 2000, but still edging up. And up. And up. Decade on decade.

      • BBD

        Please read the following article:

        Provoked scientists try to explain lag in global warming

        http://www.eenews.net/public/Greenwire/2011/10/25/1

        It has been accepted that in the last 14 years the projected 0.2 deg C per decade warming has not happened. The trend for the last 14 years was flat. Now the question is why?

      • An excellent article.

        As those of us who interest ourselves in these matter already know, the current hiatus is *not* considered to be evidence that ‘AGW is falsified’. Only the loons believe that. Scientists, as Voosen shows us, point to equatorial volcanism (sulphate aerosols), Chinese coal (sulphate aerosols), a preponderance of La Ninas, the unusually quiet SC24 and energy accumulation in the ocean intermediate layer. The *real* debate is over whether it’s some or all of the above and what proportional influence to assign ;-)

        Everybody is calling for more and better measurements.

        Meanwhile the scientific consensus that increased GHG forcing will continue to cause energy to accumulate in the climate system remains unchallenged. Most agree that by century’s end, GAT will have risen by 2C – 3C.

      • BBD

        Most agree that by century’s end, GAT will have risen by 2C – 3C.

        That is not supported by the data that shows only 0.6 deg C warming per century => http://bit.ly/S0otl3

        You can not project the recent warming of 0.2 deg C per decade warming into the future as it includes a transient warming trend from the warming phase of the multidecadal oscillation . When the multidecdal oscillation moves into its cooling phase, we will return to the long-term 0.6 deg C per century warming shown above.

        The climate pattern shown above is established as a result of the enormous heat stored in the oceans. A pattern established since 1850 for 162 years is not going to change in the next couple of decades.

        No warming until about 2030.

        It is that simple.

        BBD, this is what the data shows for 5-climate datasets => http://bit.ly/S0otl3

      • Girma

        GHG forcing will *increase* over the C21st. Extrapolating a linear trend from the C20th cannot tell us anything about the warming at the end of the C21st. This is neatly illustrated using polynomial fits rather than OLS by Nick Stokes here.

        To save time and pain, assume that I disagree with your assertions and that you lack the evidential wherewithal to persuade me. But even in the extremely unlikely event that you are correct, warming will resume very strongly once natural variability and GHG forcing begin to reinforce each other rather than operate in opposition. We would be back on track for 2C – 3C by the end of the century.

        And btw, I’m still trying to work out why you linked to the Voosen article when it doesn’t support anything you say.

      • And one other thing. Oscillations cancel out. What is driving the centennial upward trend? Why is energy accumulating in the climate system? Specifically, why is OHC rising throughout the 2000m layer? You need to account for all this in your hypothesis.

      • BBD, “And one other thing. Oscillations cancel out.” Yes, but over what time period?

      • Dearie me Captn. If the amplitude and period are regular that is easy to work out ;-)

      • Cap’n, Do you even know what a random walk is?
        Have you ever heard of Brownian motion?
        The issue that we are dealing with is classifying a real signal.

        Is it a fraction of a degree fluctuation on top of a 300 K baseline, or what we would ordinarily refer to as internal noise?

        Or is it a forcing function that will raise the steady state level (i.e. a real external energy difference) beyond one degree?

        Look up the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. The earth’s climate in the last several hundred thousand years has always been best described as a long-term random walk with reversion-to-the-mean characteristics. Now, over a short time, thanks to GHG emissions and perhaps other human-caused side-effects, we have a strong external forcing function that is pushing the mean to a new level. The climate will noisily respond just as it has in the past, by fluctuating in value as it tries to adjust to the new mean set by the current forcing function.

        Just as with any kind of noise, a wide enough temporal filter (15+ years) is needed to detect the signal.

        Oh my god, do these skeptics know nothing about signal processing and real engineering? People like Captain Bonefish would have lost track of the Voyager spacecraft the minute it left the earth’s atmosphere if they were in charge.

  97. The following Climate Etc post is relevant here:

    Why, despite steadily accumulating greenhouse gases, did the rise of the planet’s temperature stall for the past decade?”

    Candid comments from global warming scientists
    http://judithcurry.com/2011/10/27/candid-comments-from-global-warming-scientists/

  98. @ J. Curry, re: “why did he have to use that photo that makes me look like a gorgon”.
    Is it possible they got a copy of your passport photo? Mine is much the same. No smile allowed here. :-(

  99. What about the latest trend?

    John Nielsen-Gammon’s short answer:

    > [I]n addition to a flat trend over some period of years, I’d want evidence that it was not merely a temporary flat trend. In the absence of such evidence, I’d settle for a trend longer than half a PDO cycle, or 35 years or so. With such evidence, the trend could be as short as a year, because I’d be swayed not by the trend but by the evidence.

    http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/9411951921

    I’m sure Bart R will like this.

  100. Another way to show how silly signal processing arguments are when they’re void of any physical interpretation, here’s another brilliant response, this time from Vaughan Pratt:

    Lobster Logic

    Suppose you and I are two lobsters in a saucepan of water on the stove. You point out that the temperature just rose from 30 C to 40 C. Then a while later you point out that it rose from 70 C to 80 C. According to you, because the rises are 10 C in both cases, the effect of these rises on us two lobsters is the same.

    Maybe lobsters reason that way, but those who consume them don’t.

    http://neverendingaudit.tumblr.com/post/5396358714

    • Wonderful. Would you be so good as to pass the mayonnaise?
      ;-)

      • Mayonnaise on lobsters? You’re kidding, right?

        What next, mayonnaise on a pastrami sandwich? Ketchup on hotdogs?

      • Oh, sorry – I forgot – that should be “What next, mayonnaise on a pastrami on white bread sandwich?”

        (You’re a Brit, aren’t you? If so, perhaps you don’t know that pastrami must be eaten with mustard on rye. I would imagine you have similar good combination sacrilege- like ketchup on fish and chips, maybe?)

      • You’ve never dipped cold lobster meat into freshly made mayonnaise? Have a go sometime. Let me know what you think ;-)

        Pastrami and rye is an old favourite, and many Brits put ketchup on their fish and chips. Some opt for curry sauce, or mushy peas as a side. I bet you’ve never heard of mushy peas? You may be fortunate there, although Mrs BBD and Little BBD endorse the stuff enthusiastically.
        ;-)

      • Josh,

        Experiment.

        Expand your culinary vista.

        You don’t have to abandon your favorites, but exposing yourselve to the unusual may prove to be a treat.

    • Do you really think that at 70C the lobsters are making rational observations about their environment?

      At that point I’m guessing their souls are halfway to lobster heaven.

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  102. I have a question.

    Why argue over whether the data shows no warming, cooling or continued warming, when the continued warming interpretation of the data is exhibiting a rate of 0.05 C per decade?

    Why care about that? All the name calling and arguing over something so small is foolish. I have no problem accepting the position of those saying there is no zero trend. That we are still warming. Because then I can more on to what I consider the more important question – i.e. what is there about a 0.05 C per decade rate that is worrisome.

    Not that I expect to get an answer, mind you. In all the times I’ve asked I have yet to get a direct, succienct answer backed by observational data. But I’ll keep asking.

    • tim56 you write “I have a question.”

      I have an answer, or rather a different questrion, which is more relevant that the one you asked. You have posed the wrong question. The 0.05 C per decade, or thereabouts, has been going on ever since we have had decent records,starting around 1850, and probably before that back to the LIA. There has been no change in this rate of rise at all. And there is no sign that it is changing now. The more rapid rise in the latter part of the 20th century, which was wrongly ascribed to increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, is now being offset by a pause in the warming.

      So the relevant question is not “Who cares about a 0.05 C per decade rise in temperature?”. The question is, “Where is the supposed effect of adding CO2 to the atmosphere?” And the answer to my question is that it isn’t there.

      • Jim,

        I like your question. The reason I asked mine is to short circuit the CO2 as the culprit argument. Not that it isn’t a pertinent question, considering the fact most of the proposals for addressing global warming revolve around very significant to drastic reductions in CO2 output. I want to skip that because the folks I’m looking for answers from already firmly believe the evidence points to CO2.

        Lets just assume for the moment that they have the more accurate assessment. We can then move on to discussing whether or not what we are seeing is something to be concerned about or not. I don’t see how it is. Someone either has to that a world that is 0.5C warmer in 100 years is threatening and why, or they have to provide evidence that we can realistically expect a significant change in the trend over the next decade (or even two). I’m fairly confident that they can’t show the first. I’m guessing they have to rely on model output to do the latter.

      • timg56, you write “I’m guessing they have to rely on model output to do the latter.”

        I like your second paragraph. Another way of looking at the same thing, is as follows. If CAGW is correct, and global temperatures are, indeed, going to rise to very high levels by 2100, then at some point the rate of rise of temperature must be significantly greater than your 0.05 C per decade. Unless and until this happens, I am not going to believe in CAGW.

      • There are two knobs: CO2 and aerosols. We can regulate the global temperature anomaly as we wish. Simples!

        The AGW consensus is embarrassing.

      • Yeah, both are anthropogenic – so we have two knobs we can twiddle. Why is this never mentioned? Because the CO2 knob alone gives power over the minutest actions of every individual in the world, as Lindzen has long pointed out?

        If assumptions about aerosols alone come to the rescue of GCMs in the past why are they never mentioned as possible contributors to ‘mitigation’ in the future?

        If people are determined to ignore natural variability (and many street-level greens I meet seem of that mindset) I’ve been thinking this is a useful avenue to go down. Sure, we can control the future globally averaged temperature anomaly down to one tenth of a degree (to be said with a straight face, suppressing guffaws). But given that we have that amazing power, why ignore the second knob?

  103. we should start worrying when alarmists and Greens start calling for abandonment of hard won democratic liberties to Save the Planet, or even lauding Genghiz Khan as a prototype Green for the murders of millions of Asian farmers and destroying agriculture on a scale comparable with the biofuel revolution!
    Any totalitarian regime “to Save the Planet” ( needless to say, at the expense of civilised Humanity) would be a greater evil than climate change.
    Thank Heaven we now know the “Emperor” has no clothes!

  104. To Mr Genghis Cunn. Please accept my assurance that I was in no way imputing your character, in mistake for your near namesake of eight centuries ago! He had his good points no doubt- but goodwill towards all peoples was not one of them!

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  107. “I sincerely hope that the AR5 provides an assessment of what we know and what we don’t know and areas of disagreement, rather than trying to manufacture a consensus”
    Dr. Curry,
    I am not a scientist, climate or otherwise however I do have the ability to recognize BS.
    Thank you for your courage and integrity.
    Please know that there are many folks out here such as myself who apreciate someone of your stature in the scientific community who is searching for the truth!
    Please keep speaking out!

  108. I would love it if someone could explain the SCIENTIFIC basis for saying that these affects alone or in combination could NOT cause the warming we saw in 1979-1998.

    1) the PDO cycle and being in a positive phase including an extraordinary El Niño in 1998.

    2) reduction in aerosols due to extensive and massive air pollution reduction coincident with this time period

    3) sunspot/cosmic ray sun activity being at a very high level

    4) ocean currents or other cyclic phenomenon (sun) associated with long 1000 year cycle.

    5) other phenomenon not considered yet

    The fact that at least 4 of these factors were in a contributing mode begs the question that if they weren’t the dominant factor then how much did they contribute to the warming from 1979-1998. The result of this leaves the contribution of co2 in doubt as to its magnitude.

    Also recent study has been published that puts the CS at 1.1C by new and improved ice core analysis.

    Therefore it seems to me a strong case can be made that the ipcc ar4 conclusion that the period of 1979-1998 shows a high 95% confidence that the source of warming was anthropogenic in doubt. I feel like 50% is even optimistic to say that it was wholly caused by man and maybe more like 10% wholly caused by man likelihood and 50% mostly caused by man, maybe 95% that co2 had some positive contribution but possibly very small.

    Why am I wrong? I have yet to see the proof that what I’m saying is poppycock. I went to MIT and am not a dolt. I’ve studied physics, math and computer science at MIT and Stanford university. I’ve taken a global warming class at Stanford university. Nothing I’ve said seems unscientific or illogical. I don’t think I’m reaching or going out on a limb. This seems a rational scientific unbiased assertion. The science of agw is not settled if by settled we mean that we know that co2 caused the majority of the 1979-1998 warming. It’s certainly possible it did. I’m not denying that at all. I’m simply saying that the way I think a truly objective scientist would look at this is that this conjecture is simply not proven. That’s not to say it is falsified either. It is possible but I think the assertion that co2 is a dominant contributor is actually looking bad. Not just on the last 16 year pause but the fact we now know that there are these other things that must contribute some it seems more like coincidence now that co2 is higher. Also the paleo record is not 100% convincing. The numbers arrived at by this analysis have varied from 0.6 to 9. Such a large range suggests something else is a more important factor. The large errors associated with our lack of understanding of the system and how all the forcings work leads me to believe it is still possible that a large measure of the paleo climactic basis for co2 CS at 2C or greater is suspect. If our assumptions and knowledge today is correct then yes it seems the longer term CS should be higher but that may take thousands of years to materialize. The close relationship of sun cosmic rays, sunspot number correlations seem to hint that the sun somehow has a larger effect than we understand. I don’t know how but these correlations seem too blatant for them to be random. The sun must somehow interact with the environment in a more cumulative, more amplified manner than we currently understand. If so then the paleo methods would have to be modified to show significantly less co2 impact. So I am not convinced by them to a high degree of certainty.

    It’s clear to me that the politicians and political types would like to say its settled so they can enact legislation but I think science must remain pure or it will suffer. I am looking for the scientists with enough courage to admit at doubt exists and is substantial. I believe that doubt should fund additional research. I’m very interested in knowing the answer to this question and I believe we should study this area vigorously as we have been doing but that doing this on the basis that we falsify our certainty is bad for science.

  109. >> … It’s clear to me that the politicians and political types would like to say its settled so they can enact legislation but I think science must remain pure or it will suffer. <<

    This is indeed the source of the deeply problematic nature of climatology.

    Not only do political types want to legislate, they are the same people who ultimately control the purse strings of climatology. So given the huge and obvious potential political implications here, this cannot but bias climatology towards findings that favour political activism.

  110. What are the chances 4 atmospheric molecules in 10,000 (ie 400 PPM) have much sway in global climate? Really! What is the likelihood?

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  118. What If there is NO contribution from greenhouse gases; it is ALL Natural Variability???

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