Category Archives: Consensus

Ethics of climate expertise

by Judith Curry

If deference to the authoritative opinions of experts is essential to our rationality and knowledge, and if that deference unavoidably rests on trust, not only in the competence, but also in the epistemic and ethical characters of our experts–then it is high time that we get to work on the ethics of expertise. Indeed, it is past time. – John Hardwig

Continue reading

Contradiction on emotional bias in the climate domain

by Andy West

Emotions and messaging about climate change.

Continue reading

Climate psychology’s consensus bias

by Andy West

Climate psychologists have for years now puzzled over public inaction on climate change and also what makes skeptics tick (or sick), apparently making little progress on these issues.

Continue reading

Groups and herds: implications for the IPCC

by Judith Curry

Group failures often have disastrous consequences—not merely for businesses, nonprofits, and governments, but for all those affected by them. – Cass Sunstein and Reid Hastie

Continue reading

Distinguishing the academic from the interface consensus

by Judith Curry

We shed new light on the epistemic struggle between establishing consensus and acknowledging plurality, by explicating different ways of consensus-making in science and society and examining the impact hereof on their field of intersection. –  Laszlo Kosolosky and Jeroen Van Bouwel

Continue reading

What exactly is going on in their heads?

by Judith Curry

Some interesting new research on understanding  why there is a lack of public support for the climate change ‘consensus’, the nature of the scientific consensus, and agendas in characterizing the consensus.

Continue reading

Appeals to the climate consensus can give the wrong impression

by Will Howard

“Consensus” means different things to different people — and herein lies the problem.

 

Continue reading