Monthly Archives: October 2011

BEST implications for peer review

by Judith Curry

The issuing of the BEST press release prior to peer review of the papers raises some interesting and provocative issues.

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Discussion with Rich Muller

by Judith Curry

I had a 90 minute meeting with Richard Muller this evening.

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Mail on BEST

by Judith Curry

I just received this email via Peter Webster from a friend in the UK:

Hi Peter 
Woke up this morning to hear on the News that Judy is dismayed about something. What is Judy upset about? 

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Tropospheric and surface temperatures

by Donald Rapp

Santer et al. (2005) emphasized that “a robust feature” of climate models is that increasing greenhouse gas concentrations will amplify warming in the middle and upper tropical troposphere (compared to the surface). It was then with some consternation that they noted that the data do not support this prediction; indeed, surface warming typically exceeds tropospheric warming.

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Is there any good news for the environment among Evangelicals?

by Ken Wilson

It’s not been a good year for the environment or for evangelicalism. I received an especially pained email from Carl Safina, our church’s  “adopted scientist.”  Carl and I, secular scientist and evangelical pastor, have worked together to bridge the historic divide between our respective communities. But my team isn’t making that easy lately. Case in point: Carl bemoaned the fact that prominent evangelical presidential candidates are anti-science; Governor Perry of Texas, for example, denies climate change while calling constituents to pray for rain in a time of drought (a predicted effect of climate change.)

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Candid comments from global warming scientists

by Judith Curry

Roger Pielke Sr has a fascinating, even mind-boggling, post that draws from an article by Paul Voosen in Greenwire entitled “Provoked scientists try to explain lag in global warming.”

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Defending the Uncertainty Monster paper

by Judith Curry

I’ve completed a revised draft of my response the to Reply to our Uncertainty Monster paper.

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BEST(?) PR

by Judith Curry

The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) project is giving us much to discuss.  A number people have criticized the BEST PR in terms of posting the papers before the peer review process has completed, issuing a press release, etc.

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Best of the BEST critiques

by Judith Curry

The new Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature product and the accompanying papers have generated considerable discussion.  Lets focus on the technical criticisms.

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IPCC and traceability

by Judith Curry

I just got the reviews on my reply to the rebuttal submitted regarding my uncertainty monster paper.  They take exception with my criticism of transparency of the IPCC’s attribution argument.

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Imagining a post-IPCC world

by Judith Curry

Max Anacker writes:

Several posters have stated that it would be good to have a separate thread on “How should a post-IPCC world look?”

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Changing minds

by Judith Curry

Fred Moolten poses the following challenge:

I would be interested in a post asking participants how their own views have evolved as a result of participation here (and their experiences elsewhere as well). I expect few epiphanies or conversions, but I would be disappointed if no-one acknowledges learning anything. I’m sure you would be too.

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Berkeley Surface Temperatures: Released

by Judith Curry

The new surface temperature dataset developed by the Berkeley group is now available, along with four manuscripts that have been submitted for publication.

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Laframboise on the IPCC

by Judith Curry

I’ve finished reading Donna Laframboise’s book “The Delinquent Teenager Who Was Mistaken for the World’s Top Climate Expert: An Expose of the IPCC.”

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Does the Aliasing Beast Feed the Uncertainty Monster?

by Richard Saumarez

Many continuous signals are sampled so that they can be manipulated digitally.  We assume that the train of samples in the time domain gives a true picture of what the underlying signal is doing, but can we be sure that this is true and the signal isn’t doing something wildly different between samples?  Can we reconstruct the signal between samples and, more important, can we tell if the signal has been incorrectly sampled and is not a true representation of the signal?

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Self-organizing model of the atmosphere

by Frank Lemke

A recent post in our Global Warming Prediction Project discusses the question “What Drives Global Warming?” based on a self-organized interdependent nonlinear dynamic system of equations of 6 variables (ozone, aerosols, clouds, sun activity, CO2, global temperature). It also predicts using this system global warming 6 years ahead (monthly resolved) and it compares the known IPCC AR4 projections with this system prediction and the observed anomalies of the past 23 years.

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Feedback in climate

by Chris Colose

There has been a lot of blog interest recently on feedback theory and climate sensitivity (e.g., Isaac Held, ClimateAudit, Science of Doom, Nick Stokes, one on control theory here at Climate Etc.).

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Gender differences in the academic world: a reflection

by Don Aitkin

Our hostess ran a recent thread ‘On being a Radical scholar’, and she built it on article by Dr Kate Clancy, who wrote on the difficult situation of women who are doing their best to climb the academic ladder while also looking after children. I completely sympathised with her, and could identify with the stories that she heard at the Purdue conference that had prompted her essay.

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Week in review 10/15/11

by Judith Curry

Here are a few things that caught my eye this past week.

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On being a radical scholar

by Judith Curry

There are two problems with the current criteria for tenure: they don’t reflect modern, interdisciplinary scholarship, and they don’t include metrics to evaluate influence and perspective beyond peer-reviewed publications.

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Advocacy science and decision making

by Judith Curry

Partisan groups lobbying for preferred outcomes have a long history of the selective use of information to support predetermined conclusions. This is acceptable in politics, but not in science.  The motivations for such advocacy science may be a sincere desire to improve the protection of . .  ecosystems and frustration with decision-making processes that seem to give too little weight to longer term environmental considerations, or a cynical strategy to exploit the challenges that uncertainty poses to decision-making. Whatever the cause, making science advice itself partisan means it no longer deserves to be treated in any special way in the decision-making process. There is a serious risk that the long-term costs of merging advocacy with science advice would outweigh any short-term benefits of greater impact on a particular decision. If scientists do wish to increase the impact of science advice on decision-making, there are alternatives to advocacy in doing so. These approaches make the advice more amenable to decision-makers, while avoiding turning science advisors into partisan lobbyists.

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The case(?) for climate change alarmism

by Judith Curry

“Rather than justifying a lack of response to climate change, the emphasis on uncertainty enlarges the risk and reinforces the responsibility for pursuing successful long-term mitigation policy,” according to a 2010 analysis by researchers at Sandia National Laboratory.

All things considered, alarmism seems like common sense to me.

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CO2 control knob technical discussion thread

by Judith Curry

The original thread for Andy Lacis’ post got derailed by non-technical comments.  This thread is STRICTLY for technical comments (heavy moderation will be imposed); make your general comments on the original thread.

Climate, control theory, feedback: does it make sense?

by Richard Saumarez

You may wonder why a medic is writing a post on control theory in climate.

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Atmospheric CO2: the greenhouse thermostat

by Andrew Lacis

The one year anniversary is soon approaching for the Science paper that we wrote a year ago to illustrate the nature of the terrestrial greenhouse effect. I describe here how this paper came to be.

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