Monthly Archives: January 2013

Condensation-driven winds: An update

by Anastassia Makarieva, Victor Gorshkov, Douglas Sheil, Antonio Nobre, Larry Li

It’s official: our controversial paper has been published. After a burst of intense attention (some of you may remember discussions at Climate Etc., the Air Vent and the Blackboard), followed by nearly two years of waiting, our paper describing a new mechanism driving atmospheric motion has been published in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

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Open thread weekend

by Judith Curry

Its your turn to introduce topics for discussion

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Macroweather, not climate, is what you expect

by Shaun Lovejoy

When the International Meteorological Organization defined the first climate normal from 1900 to 1930, the belief was that the climate was constant, and that the newly defined climate ‘normal’ would give a close approximation to the climate.

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Berkeley Earth Update

by Steve Mosher

It has been a while since we’ve done an update and there is much to report on, including an update to the web site, some additional memos/papers to discuss and an update on the papers. Let’s start with the web site.

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Blog commenting etiquette

by Judith Curry

There is a sad lack of etiquette guides for new media. Granted, Miss Manners and her brethren have started weighing in on the correct way of handling everything from Facebook snubs to Twitter meltdowns, but there is still no set of guidelines for the proper way to handle oneself while blogging. So, an unwritten etiquette has been created for blogging, but without the benefit of a rulebook that new bloggers can consult.Emily

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Hansen on the ‘standstill’

by Judith Curry

The five-year mean global temperature has been flat for the last decade, which we interpret as a combination of natural variability and a slow down in the growth rate of net climate forcing.  – James Hansen et al.

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Geek manifesto

by Judith Curry

British journalist Mark Henderson makes a passionate case for why science and scientists deserve a greater role in politics in The Geek Manifesto. But he offers no discussion — much less remedy — for “geeks” who play politics via science. Increasing the influence of scientists won’t clean up our politics; for that, we simply need to practice better politics, which means holding institutions and authorities, including scientists, accountable to the public. – Roger Pielke Jr.

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Draft U.S. Climate Assessment Report

by Judith Curry

The U.S. National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) has released a draft of its report for public comment.

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Open thread weekend

by Judith Curry

It’s your turn to introduce new topics for discussion.

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Trusting (?) the experts

by Judith Curry

Mathbabe asks ‘Whom can you trust?’ and discusses trusting experts, climate change research, and scientific translators.

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Improving weather forecasts for the developing world

by Judith Curry

Global prediction partnerships would cost little and reduce the regional carnage caused by floods, droughts and tropical cyclones. – Peter Webster

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Peak (?) farmland

by Judith Curry

We are confident that we stand on the peak of cropland use, gazing at a wide expanse of land that will be spared for Nature. – Ausubel, Werner and Waggoner

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Is fat good?

by Judith Curry

Epidemiologists struggle to explain a study that challenges a core belief:  Fat will kill you. – William Saletan

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New Year’s resolution for scientists

by Judith Curry

Here’s a New Year’s resolution for scientists, especially in the United States: gain the confidence of people and politicians across the political spectrum by demonstrating that science is bipartisan. – Daniel Sarewitz

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