Search Results for: uncertain

Climate Change: What’s the Worst Case?

by Judith Curry My new manuscript is now available.

Early 20th century global warming

by Judith Curry A careful look at the early 20th century global warming, which is almost as large as the warming since 1950.  Until we can explain the early 20th century warming, I have little confidence IPCC and NCA4 attribution … Continue reading

Is ocean warming accelerating faster than thought?

by Nic Lewis *** UPDATE : response to comments by Zeke Hausfather appended There are a number of statements in Cheng et al. (2019) ‘How fast are the oceans warming’, (‘the paper’) that appear to be mistaken and/or potentially misleading. … Continue reading

Hothouse Earth

by Judith Curry We need to raise the bar on how we think about the possible worst case scenario for climate change.

Committed warming and the pattern effect

By Nic Lewis A critique of the paper “Greater committed warming after accounting for the pattern effect”, by Zhou, Zelinka, Dessler and Wang.

Decision strategies for uncertain, complex situations

by Judith Curry How to gain clarity when making decisions in uncertain and complex situations.

The Uncertainty Monster: Lessons From Non-Orthodox Economics

by Vincent Randall A perspective on economists’ grappling with the ‘uncertainty monster.’

Hurricanes and Climate Change: Attribution

by Judith Curry Part II:  what causes variations and changes in hurricane activity?

Climate uncertainty & risk

by Judith Curry I’ve been invited to write an article on climate uncertainty and risk.

Paris Accord: QTIIPS

by Judith Curry QTIIPS stands for Quantitatively Trivial Impact + Intense Political Symbolism. – Keith Hennessey

Four questions on climate change

by Garth Paltridge An essay on the state of climate change science.

Ocean Heat Content Surprises

by Judith Curry There have several interesting papers on ocean heat content published in recent weeks, with some very important implications.

Sea level rise: what’s the worst case?

by Judith Curry Draft of article to be submitted for journal publication.

A philospher’s reflections on AGW denial

by Dr. Paul Viminitz Of the things I care most about, AGW is near the bottom. But because, as George W. Bush put it, either you’re with us or you’re against them, I think I’d rather be interestingly wrong than … Continue reading

Beyond ENSO: new signals of seasonal to interannual predictability

by Judith Curry My new talk on improving seasonal to interannual climate predictions.

A major problem with the Resplandy et al. ocean heat uptake paper

by Nic Lewis Obviously doubtful claims about new research regarding ocean content reveal how unquestioning Nature, climate scientists and the MSM are.

Rethinking the Social Cost of Carbon

by Judith Curry The Social Cost of Carbon is emerging as a major source of contention in the Trump Administration.

The politics of knowledge

by Judith Curry One needs to ask good questions about whose claims to trust and why. – Sheila Jasanoff

Assessment of Approaches to Updating the Social Cost of Carbon

by Judith Curry Some new analyses are shedding some light on deficiencies in the approach to estimate the social cost of carbon.

Sea level rise acceleration (or not): Part VI. Projections for the 21st century

by Judith Curry The concern about sea level rise is driven primarily by projections of future sea level rise.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

Week in review – science edition

by Judith Curry A few things that caught my eye this past week.

A veneer of certainty stoking climate alarm

by Judith Curry In private, climate scientists are much less certain than they tell the public. – Rupert Darwall

Uncertainties in sea surface temperatures

by Judith Curry Two new papers have focused on the quality, uncertainties and  interpretation of global sea surface temperature data.

Warming patterns are unlikely to explain low historical estimates of climate sensitivity

By Nic Lewis A critique of of a new paper by Andrews  et al., Accounting for changing temperature patterns increases historical estimates of climate sensitivity.